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Turkey continues to chart eastern Mediterranean area disputed with Greece following frigate collision

by Kerry Herschelman

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterranean claimed by both Greece and Turkey following the 12 August collision of frigates from the two countries. AIS tracking of the survey vessel showed it continuing its movement pattern on 13–20 August.


        The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG
        Kemalreis
        participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August.
       (Turkish MND)

The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August. (Turkish MND)

The Hellenic Navy frigate Limnos collided with the Turkish frigate TCG Kemalreis on 12 August, but both ships continued to operate afterwards. The Turkish Ministry of National Defence (MND) tweeted photos of Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ in the Mediterranean with Turkish Cypriot coast guard units and escorting the Barbaros Hayrettin survey vessel on 16 August.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis’s national security advisor, Rear Admiral Alexandros Diakopoulos, resigned on 19 August after he pointed out the day before that the Oruç Reis was continuing its research activities.

Turkey issued another international maritime safety message (Navtex) on 16 August that its Yavuz drilling vessel would explore energy resources off Cyprus from 18 August to 15 September. This followed a 10 August Navtex announcing that the Oruç Reis and two auxiliary ships would conduct exploratory drilling in the area on 10–23 August.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan called during a speech on 19 August for a peaceful solution to the crisis through dialogue. However, he said Turkey’s oil exploration activities were fully in line with both international maritime law and established conventions.

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/turkey-continues-to-chart-eastern-mediterranean-area-disputed-with-greece-following-frigate-collision/

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterrane...

Turkey continues to chart eastern Mediterranean area disputed with Greece following frigate collision

by Kerry Herschelman

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterranean claimed by both Greece and Turkey following the 12 August collision of frigates from the two countries. AIS tracking of the survey vessel showed it continuing its movement pattern on 13–20 August.


        The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG
        Kemalreis
        participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August.
       (Turkish MND)

The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August. (Turkish MND)

The Hellenic Navy frigate Limnos collided with the Turkish frigate TCG Kemalreis on 12 August, but both ships continued to operate afterwards. The Turkish Ministry of National Defence (MND) tweeted photos of Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ in the Mediterranean with Turkish Cypriot coast guard units and escorting the Barbaros Hayrettin survey vessel on 16 August.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis’s national security advisor, Rear Admiral Alexandros Diakopoulos, resigned on 19 August after he pointed out the day before that the Oruç Reis was continuing its research activities.

Turkey issued another international maritime safety message (Navtex) on 16 August that its Yavuz


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Coast Guard lacks systematic process to improve surge operations, GAO reports

by Michael Fabey

The US Coast Guard (USCG) needs to develop a better system to improve the way it conducts surge operations, according to 21 September report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

“The coastguard must often rely on surge operations to reduce the impacts of catastrophic events, such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017,” the GAO said in its report ‘Coast Guard: A More Systematic Process to Resolve Recommended Actions Could Enhance Future Surge Operations'.

The GAO noted, “The coastguard documents lessons learned and best practices from surge operations – developing recommendations to improve future surges. But, the coastguard does not have a systematic process in place to track, update, and resolve all recommendations. We recommended that it establish such a process.”

From 2007 to 2020, the USCG conducted 23 major surge operations – high-intensity, short-notice emergency responses to catastrophic events such as hurricanes or oil spills. During these surges, the USCG deployed varying numbers and types of personnel, aircraft, and vessels based on event severity and duration.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia may lease submarines as it awaits delivery of nuclear-powered boats

by Ridzwan Rahmat

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) may be operating leased submarines while it awaits the delivery of its new nuclear-powered boats.

The matter was confirmed by Australia's Minister for Defence Peter Dutton in an interview with Sky News, the transcript for which was released by the defence ministry on 20 September.

Leaders of the US, the UK, and Australia announced the establishment of a new security partnership on 15 September known as AUKUS. The first initiative under the partnership will be to collaborate on developing a nuclear-powered submarine fleet for the RAN.

Australia operates a fleet of six Collins-class diesel-electric submarines (SSKs) that were commissioned between the late-1990s and early-2000s.

Given the age of the boats, there are concerns that the RAN might face a capability gap from the time the Collins-class SSKs are no longer operational till the nuclear-powered boats come into service in the late-2030s.

According to Dutton, discussions on whether Australia would lease submarines as an interim measure will be held as part of talks with the US and the UK over the next 12–18 months.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/turkey-continues-to-chart-eastern-mediterranean-area-disputed-with-greece-following-frigate-collision/

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterrane...

Turkey continues to chart eastern Mediterranean area disputed with Greece following frigate collision

by Kerry Herschelman

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterranean claimed by both Greece and Turkey following the 12 August collision of frigates from the two countries. AIS tracking of the survey vessel showed it continuing its movement pattern on 13–20 August.


        The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG
        Kemalreis
        participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August.
       (Turkish MND)

The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August. (Turkish MND)

The Hellenic Navy frigate Limnos collided with the Turkish frigate TCG Kemalreis on 12 August, but both ships continued to operate afterwards. The Turkish Ministry of National Defence (MND) tweeted photos of Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ in the Mediterranean with Turkish Cypriot coast guard units and escorting the Barbaros Hayrettin survey vessel on 16 August.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis’s national security advisor, Rear Admiral Alexandros Diakopoulos, resigned on 19 August after he pointed out the day before that the Oruç Reis was continuing its research activities.

Turkey issued another international maritime safety message (Navtex) on 16 August that its Yavuz


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Coast Guard lacks systematic process to improve surge operations, GAO reports

by Michael Fabey

The US Coast Guard (USCG) needs to develop a better system to improve the way it conducts surge operations, according to 21 September report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

“The coastguard must often rely on surge operations to reduce the impacts of catastrophic events, such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017,” the GAO said in its report ‘Coast Guard: A More Systematic Process to Resolve Recommended Actions Could Enhance Future Surge Operations'.

The GAO noted, “The coastguard documents lessons learned and best practices from surge operations – developing recommendations to improve future surges. But, the coastguard does not have a systematic process in place to track, update, and resolve all recommendations. We recommended that it establish such a process.”

From 2007 to 2020, the USCG conducted 23 major surge operations – high-intensity, short-notice emergency responses to catastrophic events such as hurricanes or oil spills. During these surges, the USCG deployed varying numbers and types of personnel, aircraft, and vessels based on event severity and duration.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia may lease submarines as it awaits delivery of nuclear-powered boats

by Ridzwan Rahmat

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) may be operating leased submarines while it awaits the delivery of its new nuclear-powered boats.

The matter was confirmed by Australia's Minister for Defence Peter Dutton in an interview with Sky News, the transcript for which was released by the defence ministry on 20 September.

Leaders of the US, the UK, and Australia announced the establishment of a new security partnership on 15 September known as AUKUS. The first initiative under the partnership will be to collaborate on developing a nuclear-powered submarine fleet for the RAN.

Australia operates a fleet of six Collins-class diesel-electric submarines (SSKs) that were commissioned between the late-1990s and early-2000s.

Given the age of the boats, there are concerns that the RAN might face a capability gap from the time the Collins-class SSKs are no longer operational till the nuclear-powered boats come into service in the late-2030s.

According to Dutton, discussions on whether Australia would lease submarines as an interim measure will be held as part of talks with the US and the UK over the next 12–18 months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/turkey-continues-to-chart-eastern-mediterranean-area-disputed-with-greece-following-frigate-collision/

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterrane...

Turkey continues to chart eastern Mediterranean area disputed with Greece following frigate collision

by Kerry Herschelman

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterranean claimed by both Greece and Turkey following the 12 August collision of frigates from the two countries. AIS tracking of the survey vessel showed it continuing its movement pattern on 13–20 August.


        The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG
        Kemalreis
        participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August.
       (Turkish MND)

The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August. (Turkish MND)

The Hellenic Navy frigate Limnos collided with the Turkish frigate TCG Kemalreis on 12 August, but both ships continued to operate afterwards. The Turkish Ministry of National Defence (MND) tweeted photos of Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ in the Mediterranean with Turkish Cypriot coast guard units and escorting the Barbaros Hayrettin survey vessel on 16 August.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis’s national security advisor, Rear Admiral Alexandros Diakopoulos, resigned on 19 August after he pointed out the day before that the Oruç Reis was continuing its research activities.

Turkey issued another international maritime safety message (Navtex) on 16 August that its Yavuz


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Coast Guard lacks systematic process to improve surge operations, GAO reports

by Michael Fabey

The US Coast Guard (USCG) needs to develop a better system to improve the way it conducts surge operations, according to 21 September report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

“The coastguard must often rely on surge operations to reduce the impacts of catastrophic events, such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017,” the GAO said in its report ‘Coast Guard: A More Systematic Process to Resolve Recommended Actions Could Enhance Future Surge Operations'.

The GAO noted, “The coastguard documents lessons learned and best practices from surge operations – developing recommendations to improve future surges. But, the coastguard does not have a systematic process in place to track, update, and resolve all recommendations. We recommended that it establish such a process.”

From 2007 to 2020, the USCG conducted 23 major surge operations – high-intensity, short-notice emergency responses to catastrophic events such as hurricanes or oil spills. During these surges, the USCG deployed varying numbers and types of personnel, aircraft, and vessels based on event severity and duration.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia may lease submarines as it awaits delivery of nuclear-powered boats

by Ridzwan Rahmat

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) may be operating leased submarines while it awaits the delivery of its new nuclear-powered boats.

The matter was confirmed by Australia's Minister for Defence Peter Dutton in an interview with Sky News, the transcript for which was released by the defence ministry on 20 September.

Leaders of the US, the UK, and Australia announced the establishment of a new security partnership on 15 September known as AUKUS. The first initiative under the partnership will be to collaborate on developing a nuclear-powered submarine fleet for the RAN.

Australia operates a fleet of six Collins-class diesel-electric submarines (SSKs) that were commissioned between the late-1990s and early-2000s.

Given the age of the boats, there are concerns that the RAN might face a capability gap from the time the Collins-class SSKs are no longer operational till the nuclear-powered boats come into service in the late-2030s.

According to Dutton, discussions on whether Australia would lease submarines as an interim measure will be held as part of talks with the US and the UK over the next 12–18 months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/turkey-continues-to-chart-eastern-mediterranean-area-disputed-with-greece-following-frigate-collision/

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterrane...

Turkey continues to chart eastern Mediterranean area disputed with Greece following frigate collision

by Kerry Herschelman

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterranean claimed by both Greece and Turkey following the 12 August collision of frigates from the two countries. AIS tracking of the survey vessel showed it continuing its movement pattern on 13–20 August.


        The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG
        Kemalreis
        participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August.
       (Turkish MND)

The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August. (Turkish MND)

The Hellenic Navy frigate Limnos collided with the Turkish frigate TCG Kemalreis on 12 August, but both ships continued to operate afterwards. The Turkish Ministry of National Defence (MND) tweeted photos of Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ in the Mediterranean with Turkish Cypriot coast guard units and escorting the Barbaros Hayrettin survey vessel on 16 August.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis’s national security advisor, Rear Admiral Alexandros Diakopoulos, resigned on 19 August after he pointed out the day before that the Oruç Reis was continuing its research activities.

Turkey issued another international maritime safety message (Navtex) on 16 August that its Yavuz


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Coast Guard lacks systematic process to improve surge operations, GAO reports

by Michael Fabey

The US Coast Guard (USCG) needs to develop a better system to improve the way it conducts surge operations, according to 21 September report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

“The coastguard must often rely on surge operations to reduce the impacts of catastrophic events, such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017,” the GAO said in its report ‘Coast Guard: A More Systematic Process to Resolve Recommended Actions Could Enhance Future Surge Operations'.

The GAO noted, “The coastguard documents lessons learned and best practices from surge operations – developing recommendations to improve future surges. But, the coastguard does not have a systematic process in place to track, update, and resolve all recommendations. We recommended that it establish such a process.”

From 2007 to 2020, the USCG conducted 23 major surge operations – high-intensity, short-notice emergency responses to catastrophic events such as hurricanes or oil spills. During these surges, the USCG deployed varying numbers and types of personnel, aircraft, and vessels based on event severity and duration.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia may lease submarines as it awaits delivery of nuclear-powered boats

by Ridzwan Rahmat

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) may be operating leased submarines while it awaits the delivery of its new nuclear-powered boats.

The matter was confirmed by Australia's Minister for Defence Peter Dutton in an interview with Sky News, the transcript for which was released by the defence ministry on 20 September.

Leaders of the US, the UK, and Australia announced the establishment of a new security partnership on 15 September known as AUKUS. The first initiative under the partnership will be to collaborate on developing a nuclear-powered submarine fleet for the RAN.

Australia operates a fleet of six Collins-class diesel-electric submarines (SSKs) that were commissioned between the late-1990s and early-2000s.

Given the age of the boats, there are concerns that the RAN might face a capability gap from the time the Collins-class SSKs are no longer operational till the nuclear-powered boats come into service in the late-2030s.

According to Dutton, discussions on whether Australia would lease submarines as an interim measure will be held as part of talks with the US and the UK over the next 12–18 months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/turkey-continues-to-chart-eastern-mediterranean-area-disputed-with-greece-following-frigate-collision/

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterrane...

Turkey continues to chart eastern Mediterranean area disputed with Greece following frigate collision

by Kerry Herschelman

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterranean claimed by both Greece and Turkey following the 12 August collision of frigates from the two countries. AIS tracking of the survey vessel showed it continuing its movement pattern on 13–20 August.


        The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG
        Kemalreis
        participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August.
       (Turkish MND)

The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August. (Turkish MND)

The Hellenic Navy frigate Limnos collided with the Turkish frigate TCG Kemalreis on 12 August, but both ships continued to operate afterwards. The Turkish Ministry of National Defence (MND) tweeted photos of Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ in the Mediterranean with Turkish Cypriot coast guard units and escorting the Barbaros Hayrettin survey vessel on 16 August.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis’s national security advisor, Rear Admiral Alexandros Diakopoulos, resigned on 19 August after he pointed out the day before that the Oruç Reis was continuing its research activities.

Turkey issued another international maritime safety message (Navtex) on 16 August that its Yavuz


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Coast Guard lacks systematic process to improve surge operations, GAO reports

by Michael Fabey

The US Coast Guard (USCG) needs to develop a better system to improve the way it conducts surge operations, according to 21 September report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

“The coastguard must often rely on surge operations to reduce the impacts of catastrophic events, such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017,” the GAO said in its report ‘Coast Guard: A More Systematic Process to Resolve Recommended Actions Could Enhance Future Surge Operations'.

The GAO noted, “The coastguard documents lessons learned and best practices from surge operations – developing recommendations to improve future surges. But, the coastguard does not have a systematic process in place to track, update, and resolve all recommendations. We recommended that it establish such a process.”

From 2007 to 2020, the USCG conducted 23 major surge operations – high-intensity, short-notice emergency responses to catastrophic events such as hurricanes or oil spills. During these surges, the USCG deployed varying numbers and types of personnel, aircraft, and vessels based on event severity and duration.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia may lease submarines as it awaits delivery of nuclear-powered boats

by Ridzwan Rahmat

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) may be operating leased submarines while it awaits the delivery of its new nuclear-powered boats.

The matter was confirmed by Australia's Minister for Defence Peter Dutton in an interview with Sky News, the transcript for which was released by the defence ministry on 20 September.

Leaders of the US, the UK, and Australia announced the establishment of a new security partnership on 15 September known as AUKUS. The first initiative under the partnership will be to collaborate on developing a nuclear-powered submarine fleet for the RAN.

Australia operates a fleet of six Collins-class diesel-electric submarines (SSKs) that were commissioned between the late-1990s and early-2000s.

Given the age of the boats, there are concerns that the RAN might face a capability gap from the time the Collins-class SSKs are no longer operational till the nuclear-powered boats come into service in the late-2030s.

According to Dutton, discussions on whether Australia would lease submarines as an interim measure will be held as part of talks with the US and the UK over the next 12–18 months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/turkey-continues-to-chart-eastern-mediterranean-area-disputed-with-greece-following-frigate-collision/

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterrane...

Turkey continues to chart eastern Mediterranean area disputed with Greece following frigate collision

by Kerry Herschelman

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterranean claimed by both Greece and Turkey following the 12 August collision of frigates from the two countries. AIS tracking of the survey vessel showed it continuing its movement pattern on 13–20 August.


        The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG
        Kemalreis
        participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August.
       (Turkish MND)

The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August. (Turkish MND)

The Hellenic Navy frigate Limnos collided with the Turkish frigate TCG Kemalreis on 12 August, but both ships continued to operate afterwards. The Turkish Ministry of National Defence (MND) tweeted photos of Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ in the Mediterranean with Turkish Cypriot coast guard units and escorting the Barbaros Hayrettin survey vessel on 16 August.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis’s national security advisor, Rear Admiral Alexandros Diakopoulos, resigned on 19 August after he pointed out the day before that the Oruç Reis was continuing its research activities.

Turkey issued another international maritime safety message (Navtex) on 16 August that its Yavuz


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Coast Guard lacks systematic process to improve surge operations, GAO reports

by Michael Fabey

The US Coast Guard (USCG) needs to develop a better system to improve the way it conducts surge operations, according to 21 September report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

“The coastguard must often rely on surge operations to reduce the impacts of catastrophic events, such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017,” the GAO said in its report ‘Coast Guard: A More Systematic Process to Resolve Recommended Actions Could Enhance Future Surge Operations'.

The GAO noted, “The coastguard documents lessons learned and best practices from surge operations – developing recommendations to improve future surges. But, the coastguard does not have a systematic process in place to track, update, and resolve all recommendations. We recommended that it establish such a process.”

From 2007 to 2020, the USCG conducted 23 major surge operations – high-intensity, short-notice emergency responses to catastrophic events such as hurricanes or oil spills. During these surges, the USCG deployed varying numbers and types of personnel, aircraft, and vessels based on event severity and duration.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia may lease submarines as it awaits delivery of nuclear-powered boats

by Ridzwan Rahmat

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) may be operating leased submarines while it awaits the delivery of its new nuclear-powered boats.

The matter was confirmed by Australia's Minister for Defence Peter Dutton in an interview with Sky News, the transcript for which was released by the defence ministry on 20 September.

Leaders of the US, the UK, and Australia announced the establishment of a new security partnership on 15 September known as AUKUS. The first initiative under the partnership will be to collaborate on developing a nuclear-powered submarine fleet for the RAN.

Australia operates a fleet of six Collins-class diesel-electric submarines (SSKs) that were commissioned between the late-1990s and early-2000s.

Given the age of the boats, there are concerns that the RAN might face a capability gap from the time the Collins-class SSKs are no longer operational till the nuclear-powered boats come into service in the late-2030s.

According to Dutton, discussions on whether Australia would lease submarines as an interim measure will be held as part of talks with the US and the UK over the next 12–18 months.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/turkey-continues-to-chart-eastern-mediterranean-area-disputed-with-greece-following-frigate-collision/

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterrane...

Turkey continues to chart eastern Mediterranean area disputed with Greece following frigate collision

by Kerry Herschelman

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterranean claimed by both Greece and Turkey following the 12 August collision of frigates from the two countries. AIS tracking of the survey vessel showed it continuing its movement pattern on 13–20 August.


        The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG
        Kemalreis
        participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August.
       (Turkish MND)

The Turkish MND tweeted photos of the Turkish Navy frigate TCG Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ on 16 August. (Turkish MND)

The Hellenic Navy frigate Limnos collided with the Turkish frigate TCG Kemalreis on 12 August, but both ships continued to operate afterwards. The Turkish Ministry of National Defence (MND) tweeted photos of Kemalreis participating in Operation ‘Mediterranean Shield’ in the Mediterranean with Turkish Cypriot coast guard units and escorting the Barbaros Hayrettin survey vessel on 16 August.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis’s national security advisor, Rear Admiral Alexandros Diakopoulos, resigned on 19 August after he pointed out the day before that the Oruç Reis was continuing its research activities.

Turkey issued another international maritime safety message (Navtex) on 16 August that its Yavuz


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Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


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US Coast Guard lacks systematic process to improve surge operations, GAO reports

by Michael Fabey

The US Coast Guard (USCG) needs to develop a better system to improve the way it conducts surge operations, according to 21 September report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

“The coastguard must often rely on surge operations to reduce the impacts of catastrophic events, such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017,” the GAO said in its report ‘Coast Guard: A More Systematic Process to Resolve Recommended Actions Could Enhance Future Surge Operations'.

The GAO noted, “The coastguard documents lessons learned and best practices from surge operations – developing recommendations to improve future surges. But, the coastguard does not have a systematic process in place to track, update, and resolve all recommendations. We recommended that it establish such a process.”

From 2007 to 2020, the USCG conducted 23 major surge operations – high-intensity, short-notice emergency responses to catastrophic events such as hurricanes or oil spills. During these surges, the USCG deployed varying numbers and types of personnel, aircraft, and vessels based on event severity and duration.


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Australia may lease submarines as it awaits delivery of nuclear-powered boats

by Ridzwan Rahmat

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) may be operating leased submarines while it awaits the delivery of its new nuclear-powered boats.

The matter was confirmed by Australia's Minister for Defence Peter Dutton in an interview with Sky News, the transcript for which was released by the defence ministry on 20 September.

Leaders of the US, the UK, and Australia announced the establishment of a new security partnership on 15 September known as AUKUS. The first initiative under the partnership will be to collaborate on developing a nuclear-powered submarine fleet for the RAN.

Australia operates a fleet of six Collins-class diesel-electric submarines (SSKs) that were commissioned between the late-1990s and early-2000s.

Given the age of the boats, there are concerns that the RAN might face a capability gap from the time the Collins-class SSKs are no longer operational till the nuclear-powered boats come into service in the late-2030s.

According to Dutton, discussions on whether Australia would lease submarines as an interim measure will be held as part of talks with the US and the UK over the next 12–18 months.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/turkey-continues-to-chart-eastern-mediterranean-area-disputed-with-greece-following-frigate-collision/

The Turkish geological survey vessel Oruç Reis continued to chart an area in the eastern Mediterrane...

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