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Russia's Security Council gains power

by Mark Galeotti

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of its Soviet counterpart to the Soviet Security Council, although during the 1990s it was often of questionable value, acting more as a half-way house for officials on their way to retirement. It is technically an arm of the powerful Presidential Administration (Administratsiya Prezidenta: AP), the institution that has emerged as Russian President Vladimir Putin’s primary agency of management.

In practice, the SB is an autonomous body, especially since 2008, when Nikolai Patrushev, one of Putin’s most trusted allies, became its secretary (see box). Although the body is not the reincarnation of the ruling Soviet Politburo as is often suggested, the evidence shows that the SB’s remit and power has expanded in recent years, particularly since 2011.

Drawing on Russian media reports, official government records, public statements, and conversations with former and serving Russian security officials, Janes has explored the strengths and limitations of this body and tracked the way that, in parallel with the increasing strength of the AP, the SB has become the key institution shaping the broad parameters of security policy, both domestic and external.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the Security Council at the Kremlin in Moscow on 5 April 2019. The remit and power of the Security Council have expanded since 2011. (Alexei Druzhinin/AFP via Getty Images)

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the Security Council at the Kremlin in Moscow on 5 April 2019. The remit and power of the Security Council have expanded since 2011. (Alexei Druzhinin/AFP via Getty Images)

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/russias-security-council-gains-power/

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of ...

Russia's Security Council gains power

by Mark Galeotti

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of its Soviet counterpart to the Soviet Security Council, although during the 1990s it was often of questionable value, acting more as a half-way house for officials on their way to retirement. It is technically an arm of the powerful Presidential Administration (Administratsiya Prezidenta: AP), the institution that has emerged as Russian President Vladimir Putin’s primary agency of management.

In practice, the SB is an autonomous body, especially since 2008, when Nikolai Patrushev, one of Putin’s most trusted allies, became its secretary (see box). Although the body is not the reincarnation of the ruling Soviet Politburo as is often suggested, the evidence shows that the SB’s remit and power has expanded in recent years, particularly since 2011.

Drawing on Russian media reports, official government records, public statements, and conversations with former and serving Russian security officials, Janes has explored the strengths and limitations of this body and tracked the way that, in parallel with the increasing strength of the AP, the SB has become the key institution shaping the broad parameters of security policy, both domestic and external.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the Security Council at the Kremlin in Moscow on 5 April 2019. The remit and power of the Security Council have expanded since 2011. (Alexei Druzhinin/AFP via Getty Images)


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RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


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DSEI 2021: Head of UK Strategic Command lays out new vision of military power

by Tim Ripley

Future battlefield advantage will not come from numerical supremacy in warships, fighter squadrons or soldiers but machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), according to the Head of UK Strategic Command, General Sir Patrick Sanders.

Speaking at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September, Gen Sanders said that the adoption of these new technologies would give the British Armed Forces advantage in future conflicts. He described this technological revolution as being at the heart of the ‘Multi-Domain Integration' concept, as laid out in March's Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

“Fundamentally, the source of battlefield advantage will not come from platforms,” said Gen Sanders. “If we focus, as some commentary invariably does, on the number of grey hulls the navy has, the number of fighter squadrons in the [Royal Air Force] and the strength of the regular army, we will simply perpetuate a traditional, industrial age force that is costly, exquisite, and vulnerable to being defeated in detail.”


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RAAF completes P-8A Poseidon modification programme to support future upgrades

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Australia's 12th P-8A Poseidon aircraft is seen here shortly after arriving at RAAF Base Edinburgh on 12 December 2019. On 15 September 2021 the RAAF announced that its P-8A fleet had completed a series of modifications to enable future capability upgrades. (Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

The Royal Australian Air Force's (RAAF's) fleet of Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft has undergone a series of modifications to support future capability upgrades.

The service announced on 15 September that the modification programme was completed on 28 July, when work was finalised on aircraft A47-006 at RAAF Base Edinburgh in South Australia.

The RAAF said in a statement that the 12-month programme was carried out by Boeing along with personnel from the P-8A Enterprise, which includes supporting elements from Boeing Defence Australia, Airbus Australia Pacific, No 92 Wing, and the Surveillance and Response Systems Program Office.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/russias-security-council-gains-power/

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of ...

Russia's Security Council gains power

by Mark Galeotti

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of its Soviet counterpart to the Soviet Security Council, although during the 1990s it was often of questionable value, acting more as a half-way house for officials on their way to retirement. It is technically an arm of the powerful Presidential Administration (Administratsiya Prezidenta: AP), the institution that has emerged as Russian President Vladimir Putin’s primary agency of management.

In practice, the SB is an autonomous body, especially since 2008, when Nikolai Patrushev, one of Putin’s most trusted allies, became its secretary (see box). Although the body is not the reincarnation of the ruling Soviet Politburo as is often suggested, the evidence shows that the SB’s remit and power has expanded in recent years, particularly since 2011.

Drawing on Russian media reports, official government records, public statements, and conversations with former and serving Russian security officials, Janes has explored the strengths and limitations of this body and tracked the way that, in parallel with the increasing strength of the AP, the SB has become the key institution shaping the broad parameters of security policy, both domestic and external.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the Security Council at the Kremlin in Moscow on 5 April 2019. The remit and power of the Security Council have expanded since 2011. (Alexei Druzhinin/AFP via Getty Images)


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RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


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DSEI 2021: Head of UK Strategic Command lays out new vision of military power

by Tim Ripley

Future battlefield advantage will not come from numerical supremacy in warships, fighter squadrons or soldiers but machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), according to the Head of UK Strategic Command, General Sir Patrick Sanders.

Speaking at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September, Gen Sanders said that the adoption of these new technologies would give the British Armed Forces advantage in future conflicts. He described this technological revolution as being at the heart of the ‘Multi-Domain Integration' concept, as laid out in March's Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

“Fundamentally, the source of battlefield advantage will not come from platforms,” said Gen Sanders. “If we focus, as some commentary invariably does, on the number of grey hulls the navy has, the number of fighter squadrons in the [Royal Air Force] and the strength of the regular army, we will simply perpetuate a traditional, industrial age force that is costly, exquisite, and vulnerable to being defeated in detail.”


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RAAF completes P-8A Poseidon modification programme to support future upgrades

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Australia's 12th P-8A Poseidon aircraft is seen here shortly after arriving at RAAF Base Edinburgh on 12 December 2019. On 15 September 2021 the RAAF announced that its P-8A fleet had completed a series of modifications to enable future capability upgrades. (Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

The Royal Australian Air Force's (RAAF's) fleet of Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft has undergone a series of modifications to support future capability upgrades.

The service announced on 15 September that the modification programme was completed on 28 July, when work was finalised on aircraft A47-006 at RAAF Base Edinburgh in South Australia.

The RAAF said in a statement that the 12-month programme was carried out by Boeing along with personnel from the P-8A Enterprise, which includes supporting elements from Boeing Defence Australia, Airbus Australia Pacific, No 92 Wing, and the Surveillance and Response Systems Program Office.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/russias-security-council-gains-power/

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of ...

Russia's Security Council gains power

by Mark Galeotti

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of its Soviet counterpart to the Soviet Security Council, although during the 1990s it was often of questionable value, acting more as a half-way house for officials on their way to retirement. It is technically an arm of the powerful Presidential Administration (Administratsiya Prezidenta: AP), the institution that has emerged as Russian President Vladimir Putin’s primary agency of management.

In practice, the SB is an autonomous body, especially since 2008, when Nikolai Patrushev, one of Putin’s most trusted allies, became its secretary (see box). Although the body is not the reincarnation of the ruling Soviet Politburo as is often suggested, the evidence shows that the SB’s remit and power has expanded in recent years, particularly since 2011.

Drawing on Russian media reports, official government records, public statements, and conversations with former and serving Russian security officials, Janes has explored the strengths and limitations of this body and tracked the way that, in parallel with the increasing strength of the AP, the SB has become the key institution shaping the broad parameters of security policy, both domestic and external.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the Security Council at the Kremlin in Moscow on 5 April 2019. The remit and power of the Security Council have expanded since 2011. (Alexei Druzhinin/AFP via Getty Images)


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Head of UK Strategic Command lays out new vision of military power

by Tim Ripley

Future battlefield advantage will not come from numerical supremacy in warships, fighter squadrons or soldiers but machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), according to the Head of UK Strategic Command, General Sir Patrick Sanders.

Speaking at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September, Gen Sanders said that the adoption of these new technologies would give the British Armed Forces advantage in future conflicts. He described this technological revolution as being at the heart of the ‘Multi-Domain Integration' concept, as laid out in March's Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

“Fundamentally, the source of battlefield advantage will not come from platforms,” said Gen Sanders. “If we focus, as some commentary invariably does, on the number of grey hulls the navy has, the number of fighter squadrons in the [Royal Air Force] and the strength of the regular army, we will simply perpetuate a traditional, industrial age force that is costly, exquisite, and vulnerable to being defeated in detail.”


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAAF completes P-8A Poseidon modification programme to support future upgrades

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Australia's 12th P-8A Poseidon aircraft is seen here shortly after arriving at RAAF Base Edinburgh on 12 December 2019. On 15 September 2021 the RAAF announced that its P-8A fleet had completed a series of modifications to enable future capability upgrades. (Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

The Royal Australian Air Force's (RAAF's) fleet of Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft has undergone a series of modifications to support future capability upgrades.

The service announced on 15 September that the modification programme was completed on 28 July, when work was finalised on aircraft A47-006 at RAAF Base Edinburgh in South Australia.

The RAAF said in a statement that the 12-month programme was carried out by Boeing along with personnel from the P-8A Enterprise, which includes supporting elements from Boeing Defence Australia, Airbus Australia Pacific, No 92 Wing, and the Surveillance and Response Systems Program Office.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/russias-security-council-gains-power/

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of ...

Russia's Security Council gains power

by Mark Galeotti

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of its Soviet counterpart to the Soviet Security Council, although during the 1990s it was often of questionable value, acting more as a half-way house for officials on their way to retirement. It is technically an arm of the powerful Presidential Administration (Administratsiya Prezidenta: AP), the institution that has emerged as Russian President Vladimir Putin’s primary agency of management.

In practice, the SB is an autonomous body, especially since 2008, when Nikolai Patrushev, one of Putin’s most trusted allies, became its secretary (see box). Although the body is not the reincarnation of the ruling Soviet Politburo as is often suggested, the evidence shows that the SB’s remit and power has expanded in recent years, particularly since 2011.

Drawing on Russian media reports, official government records, public statements, and conversations with former and serving Russian security officials, Janes has explored the strengths and limitations of this body and tracked the way that, in parallel with the increasing strength of the AP, the SB has become the key institution shaping the broad parameters of security policy, both domestic and external.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the Security Council at the Kremlin in Moscow on 5 April 2019. The remit and power of the Security Council have expanded since 2011. (Alexei Druzhinin/AFP via Getty Images)


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Head of UK Strategic Command lays out new vision of military power

by Tim Ripley

Future battlefield advantage will not come from numerical supremacy in warships, fighter squadrons or soldiers but machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), according to the Head of UK Strategic Command, General Sir Patrick Sanders.

Speaking at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September, Gen Sanders said that the adoption of these new technologies would give the British Armed Forces advantage in future conflicts. He described this technological revolution as being at the heart of the ‘Multi-Domain Integration' concept, as laid out in March's Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

“Fundamentally, the source of battlefield advantage will not come from platforms,” said Gen Sanders. “If we focus, as some commentary invariably does, on the number of grey hulls the navy has, the number of fighter squadrons in the [Royal Air Force] and the strength of the regular army, we will simply perpetuate a traditional, industrial age force that is costly, exquisite, and vulnerable to being defeated in detail.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAAF completes P-8A Poseidon modification programme to support future upgrades

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Australia's 12th P-8A Poseidon aircraft is seen here shortly after arriving at RAAF Base Edinburgh on 12 December 2019. On 15 September 2021 the RAAF announced that its P-8A fleet had completed a series of modifications to enable future capability upgrades. (Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

The Royal Australian Air Force's (RAAF's) fleet of Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft has undergone a series of modifications to support future capability upgrades.

The service announced on 15 September that the modification programme was completed on 28 July, when work was finalised on aircraft A47-006 at RAAF Base Edinburgh in South Australia.

The RAAF said in a statement that the 12-month programme was carried out by Boeing along with personnel from the P-8A Enterprise, which includes supporting elements from Boeing Defence Australia, Airbus Australia Pacific, No 92 Wing, and the Surveillance and Response Systems Program Office.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/russias-security-council-gains-power/

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of ...

Russia's Security Council gains power

by Mark Galeotti

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of its Soviet counterpart to the Soviet Security Council, although during the 1990s it was often of questionable value, acting more as a half-way house for officials on their way to retirement. It is technically an arm of the powerful Presidential Administration (Administratsiya Prezidenta: AP), the institution that has emerged as Russian President Vladimir Putin’s primary agency of management.

In practice, the SB is an autonomous body, especially since 2008, when Nikolai Patrushev, one of Putin’s most trusted allies, became its secretary (see box). Although the body is not the reincarnation of the ruling Soviet Politburo as is often suggested, the evidence shows that the SB’s remit and power has expanded in recent years, particularly since 2011.

Drawing on Russian media reports, official government records, public statements, and conversations with former and serving Russian security officials, Janes has explored the strengths and limitations of this body and tracked the way that, in parallel with the increasing strength of the AP, the SB has become the key institution shaping the broad parameters of security policy, both domestic and external.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the Security Council at the Kremlin in Moscow on 5 April 2019. The remit and power of the Security Council have expanded since 2011. (Alexei Druzhinin/AFP via Getty Images)


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Head of UK Strategic Command lays out new vision of military power

by Tim Ripley

Future battlefield advantage will not come from numerical supremacy in warships, fighter squadrons or soldiers but machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), according to the Head of UK Strategic Command, General Sir Patrick Sanders.

Speaking at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September, Gen Sanders said that the adoption of these new technologies would give the British Armed Forces advantage in future conflicts. He described this technological revolution as being at the heart of the ‘Multi-Domain Integration' concept, as laid out in March's Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

“Fundamentally, the source of battlefield advantage will not come from platforms,” said Gen Sanders. “If we focus, as some commentary invariably does, on the number of grey hulls the navy has, the number of fighter squadrons in the [Royal Air Force] and the strength of the regular army, we will simply perpetuate a traditional, industrial age force that is costly, exquisite, and vulnerable to being defeated in detail.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAAF completes P-8A Poseidon modification programme to support future upgrades

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Australia's 12th P-8A Poseidon aircraft is seen here shortly after arriving at RAAF Base Edinburgh on 12 December 2019. On 15 September 2021 the RAAF announced that its P-8A fleet had completed a series of modifications to enable future capability upgrades. (Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

The Royal Australian Air Force's (RAAF's) fleet of Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft has undergone a series of modifications to support future capability upgrades.

The service announced on 15 September that the modification programme was completed on 28 July, when work was finalised on aircraft A47-006 at RAAF Base Edinburgh in South Australia.

The RAAF said in a statement that the 12-month programme was carried out by Boeing along with personnel from the P-8A Enterprise, which includes supporting elements from Boeing Defence Australia, Airbus Australia Pacific, No 92 Wing, and the Surveillance and Response Systems Program Office.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/russias-security-council-gains-power/

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of ...

Russia's Security Council gains power

by Mark Galeotti

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of its Soviet counterpart to the Soviet Security Council, although during the 1990s it was often of questionable value, acting more as a half-way house for officials on their way to retirement. It is technically an arm of the powerful Presidential Administration (Administratsiya Prezidenta: AP), the institution that has emerged as Russian President Vladimir Putin’s primary agency of management.

In practice, the SB is an autonomous body, especially since 2008, when Nikolai Patrushev, one of Putin’s most trusted allies, became its secretary (see box). Although the body is not the reincarnation of the ruling Soviet Politburo as is often suggested, the evidence shows that the SB’s remit and power has expanded in recent years, particularly since 2011.

Drawing on Russian media reports, official government records, public statements, and conversations with former and serving Russian security officials, Janes has explored the strengths and limitations of this body and tracked the way that, in parallel with the increasing strength of the AP, the SB has become the key institution shaping the broad parameters of security policy, both domestic and external.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the Security Council at the Kremlin in Moscow on 5 April 2019. The remit and power of the Security Council have expanded since 2011. (Alexei Druzhinin/AFP via Getty Images)


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Head of UK Strategic Command lays out new vision of military power

by Tim Ripley

Future battlefield advantage will not come from numerical supremacy in warships, fighter squadrons or soldiers but machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), according to the Head of UK Strategic Command, General Sir Patrick Sanders.

Speaking at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September, Gen Sanders said that the adoption of these new technologies would give the British Armed Forces advantage in future conflicts. He described this technological revolution as being at the heart of the ‘Multi-Domain Integration' concept, as laid out in March's Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

“Fundamentally, the source of battlefield advantage will not come from platforms,” said Gen Sanders. “If we focus, as some commentary invariably does, on the number of grey hulls the navy has, the number of fighter squadrons in the [Royal Air Force] and the strength of the regular army, we will simply perpetuate a traditional, industrial age force that is costly, exquisite, and vulnerable to being defeated in detail.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAAF completes P-8A Poseidon modification programme to support future upgrades

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Australia's 12th P-8A Poseidon aircraft is seen here shortly after arriving at RAAF Base Edinburgh on 12 December 2019. On 15 September 2021 the RAAF announced that its P-8A fleet had completed a series of modifications to enable future capability upgrades. (Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

The Royal Australian Air Force's (RAAF's) fleet of Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft has undergone a series of modifications to support future capability upgrades.

The service announced on 15 September that the modification programme was completed on 28 July, when work was finalised on aircraft A47-006 at RAAF Base Edinburgh in South Australia.

The RAAF said in a statement that the 12-month programme was carried out by Boeing along with personnel from the P-8A Enterprise, which includes supporting elements from Boeing Defence Australia, Airbus Australia Pacific, No 92 Wing, and the Surveillance and Response Systems Program Office.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/russias-security-council-gains-power/

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of ...

Russia's Security Council gains power

by Mark Galeotti

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of its Soviet counterpart to the Soviet Security Council, although during the 1990s it was often of questionable value, acting more as a half-way house for officials on their way to retirement. It is technically an arm of the powerful Presidential Administration (Administratsiya Prezidenta: AP), the institution that has emerged as Russian President Vladimir Putin’s primary agency of management.

In practice, the SB is an autonomous body, especially since 2008, when Nikolai Patrushev, one of Putin’s most trusted allies, became its secretary (see box). Although the body is not the reincarnation of the ruling Soviet Politburo as is often suggested, the evidence shows that the SB’s remit and power has expanded in recent years, particularly since 2011.

Drawing on Russian media reports, official government records, public statements, and conversations with former and serving Russian security officials, Janes has explored the strengths and limitations of this body and tracked the way that, in parallel with the increasing strength of the AP, the SB has become the key institution shaping the broad parameters of security policy, both domestic and external.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the Security Council at the Kremlin in Moscow on 5 April 2019. The remit and power of the Security Council have expanded since 2011. (Alexei Druzhinin/AFP via Getty Images)


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


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DSEI 2021: Head of UK Strategic Command lays out new vision of military power

by Tim Ripley

Future battlefield advantage will not come from numerical supremacy in warships, fighter squadrons or soldiers but machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), according to the Head of UK Strategic Command, General Sir Patrick Sanders.

Speaking at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September, Gen Sanders said that the adoption of these new technologies would give the British Armed Forces advantage in future conflicts. He described this technological revolution as being at the heart of the ‘Multi-Domain Integration' concept, as laid out in March's Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

“Fundamentally, the source of battlefield advantage will not come from platforms,” said Gen Sanders. “If we focus, as some commentary invariably does, on the number of grey hulls the navy has, the number of fighter squadrons in the [Royal Air Force] and the strength of the regular army, we will simply perpetuate a traditional, industrial age force that is costly, exquisite, and vulnerable to being defeated in detail.”


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RAAF completes P-8A Poseidon modification programme to support future upgrades

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Australia's 12th P-8A Poseidon aircraft is seen here shortly after arriving at RAAF Base Edinburgh on 12 December 2019. On 15 September 2021 the RAAF announced that its P-8A fleet had completed a series of modifications to enable future capability upgrades. (Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

The Royal Australian Air Force's (RAAF's) fleet of Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft has undergone a series of modifications to support future capability upgrades.

The service announced on 15 September that the modification programme was completed on 28 July, when work was finalised on aircraft A47-006 at RAAF Base Edinburgh in South Australia.

The RAAF said in a statement that the 12-month programme was carried out by Boeing along with personnel from the P-8A Enterprise, which includes supporting elements from Boeing Defence Australia, Airbus Australia Pacific, No 92 Wing, and the Surveillance and Response Systems Program Office.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/russias-security-council-gains-power/

Russia’s Security Council (Sovet Bezopasnosti: SB) was established in 1992, the direct successor of ...

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