Janes - News page

Israel rejects UAE F-35 buy part of peace agreement

by Gareth Jennings

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) includes any reference to lifting restrictions on arms sales to the Gulf state in general, and on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in particular.

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) issued its statement on 18 August, refuting claims circulating in the media and elsewhere that the deal with the UAE announced five days prior included the sale of any weapons that are currently restricted due to Washington’s long-standing pledge to maintain Israel’s military qualitative edge.

“The peace agreement with the United Arab Emirates does not include any reference to arms sales, and the US has made it clear that it will always take strict care to maintain Israel's qualitative edge”, the PMO said. “From the outset, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale of F-35s and other advanced weaponry to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/israel-rejects-uae-f-35-buy-part-of-peace-agreement/

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emira...

Israel rejects UAE F-35 buy part of peace agreement

by Gareth Jennings

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) includes any reference to lifting restrictions on arms sales to the Gulf state in general, and on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in particular.

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) issued its statement on 18 August, refuting claims circulating in the media and elsewhere that the deal with the UAE announced five days prior included the sale of any weapons that are currently restricted due to Washington’s long-standing pledge to maintain Israel’s military qualitative edge.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army's ‘light tank' competition enters limited user-testing phase

by Ashley Roque

A representation of BAE Systems' MPF prototype that is designed for three crew members. (BAE Systems )

The US Army intends to decide which company will build its new ‘light tank' in the April-to-June 2022 timeframe and is currently conducting a limited user test with two different prototypes to help guide this decision.

Ashley John, the Public Affairs Director for the army's Program Executive Office for Ground Combat Systems, gave Janes an update of the service's Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) competition that involves evaluating 12 prototypes built by BAE Systems and another dozen from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS).

Each company received a contract valued up to USD376 million to build its respective MPF vehicle lot with the initial expectation that all prototypes would be delivered to the army between March 2020 and the end of August 2020. However, neither company met this timetable. The army attributed these delays to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and other supply and integration issues.

GDLS delivered its 12th and final prototype to the army at the end of December 2020.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


WB Group unveils W2MPIR swarming UAV system

by Jakub Link-Lenczowski

W2MPIR's main components: FT-5, FlyEye, and Warmate presented during the MSPO 2021 in Kielce. (Jakub Link-Lenczowski)

Polsnd's WB Group is pushing its new W2MPIR swarming unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system, which it says is designed to defeat an adversary's layered air defences.

The system comprises the company's FlyEye and FT-5 Łoś (Moose) tactical reconnaissance UAVs, as well as Warmate 1 (3.0) and Warmate 2 loitering munitions. These are controlled by the Topaz integrated combat management system (ICMS).

WB Group is also offering its encrypted low-emission Silent Radio Network suite – derived from the Perad radios suppled by subsidiary Radmor – to support communications between W2MPIR nodes.

“The main advantage of the W2MPIR system is the combination of Silent Radio Network communication system and Topaz [ICMS] unmanned aircraft systems [that are] capable of reconnaissance, electronic intelligence, and jamming [including the] FT-5 and FlyEye in co-operation with loitering munitions systems Warmate and Warmate 2,” Remigiusz Wilk, head of communications at WB Group, told Janes on 15 September.

“WB Group's UASs features artificial intelligence [AI] to support navigation, stack, and attack capabilities,” added Wilk.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/israel-rejects-uae-f-35-buy-part-of-peace-agreement/

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emira...

Israel rejects UAE F-35 buy part of peace agreement

by Gareth Jennings

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) includes any reference to lifting restrictions on arms sales to the Gulf state in general, and on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in particular.

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) issued its statement on 18 August, refuting claims circulating in the media and elsewhere that the deal with the UAE announced five days prior included the sale of any weapons that are currently restricted due to Washington’s long-standing pledge to maintain Israel’s military qualitative edge.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army's ‘light tank' competition enters limited user-testing phase

by Ashley Roque

A representation of BAE Systems' MPF prototype that is designed for three crew members. (BAE Systems )

The US Army intends to decide which company will build its new ‘light tank' in the April-to-June 2022 timeframe and is currently conducting a limited user test with two different prototypes to help guide this decision.

Ashley John, the Public Affairs Director for the army's Program Executive Office for Ground Combat Systems, gave Janes an update of the service's Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) competition that involves evaluating 12 prototypes built by BAE Systems and another dozen from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS).

Each company received a contract valued up to USD376 million to build its respective MPF vehicle lot with the initial expectation that all prototypes would be delivered to the army between March 2020 and the end of August 2020. However, neither company met this timetable. The army attributed these delays to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and other supply and integration issues.

GDLS delivered its 12th and final prototype to the army at the end of December 2020.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


WB Group unveils W2MPIR swarming UAV system

by Jakub Link-Lenczowski

W2MPIR's main components: FT-5, FlyEye, and Warmate presented during the MSPO 2021 in Kielce. (Jakub Link-Lenczowski)

Polsnd's WB Group is pushing its new W2MPIR swarming unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system, which it says is designed to defeat an adversary's layered air defences.

The system comprises the company's FlyEye and FT-5 Łoś (Moose) tactical reconnaissance UAVs, as well as Warmate 1 (3.0) and Warmate 2 loitering munitions. These are controlled by the Topaz integrated combat management system (ICMS).

WB Group is also offering its encrypted low-emission Silent Radio Network suite – derived from the Perad radios suppled by subsidiary Radmor – to support communications between W2MPIR nodes.

“The main advantage of the W2MPIR system is the combination of Silent Radio Network communication system and Topaz [ICMS] unmanned aircraft systems [that are] capable of reconnaissance, electronic intelligence, and jamming [including the] FT-5 and FlyEye in co-operation with loitering munitions systems Warmate and Warmate 2,” Remigiusz Wilk, head of communications at WB Group, told Janes on 15 September.

“WB Group's UASs features artificial intelligence [AI] to support navigation, stack, and attack capabilities,” added Wilk.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/israel-rejects-uae-f-35-buy-part-of-peace-agreement/

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emira...

Israel rejects UAE F-35 buy part of peace agreement

by Gareth Jennings

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) includes any reference to lifting restrictions on arms sales to the Gulf state in general, and on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in particular.

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) issued its statement on 18 August, refuting claims circulating in the media and elsewhere that the deal with the UAE announced five days prior included the sale of any weapons that are currently restricted due to Washington’s long-standing pledge to maintain Israel’s military qualitative edge.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army's ‘light tank' competition enters limited user-testing phase

by Ashley Roque

A representation of BAE Systems' MPF prototype that is designed for three crew members. (BAE Systems )

The US Army intends to decide which company will build its new ‘light tank' in the April-to-June 2022 timeframe and is currently conducting a limited user test with two different prototypes to help guide this decision.

Ashley John, the Public Affairs Director for the army's Program Executive Office for Ground Combat Systems, gave Janes an update of the service's Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) competition that involves evaluating 12 prototypes built by BAE Systems and another dozen from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS).

Each company received a contract valued up to USD376 million to build its respective MPF vehicle lot with the initial expectation that all prototypes would be delivered to the army between March 2020 and the end of August 2020. However, neither company met this timetable. The army attributed these delays to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and other supply and integration issues.

GDLS delivered its 12th and final prototype to the army at the end of December 2020.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


WB Group unveils W2MPIR swarming UAV system

by Jakub Link-Lenczowski

W2MPIR's main components: FT-5, FlyEye, and Warmate presented during the MSPO 2021 in Kielce. (Jakub Link-Lenczowski)

Polsnd's WB Group is pushing its new W2MPIR swarming unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system, which it says is designed to defeat an adversary's layered air defences.

The system comprises the company's FlyEye and FT-5 Łoś (Moose) tactical reconnaissance UAVs, as well as Warmate 1 (3.0) and Warmate 2 loitering munitions. These are controlled by the Topaz integrated combat management system (ICMS).

WB Group is also offering its encrypted low-emission Silent Radio Network suite – derived from the Perad radios suppled by subsidiary Radmor – to support communications between W2MPIR nodes.

“The main advantage of the W2MPIR system is the combination of Silent Radio Network communication system and Topaz [ICMS] unmanned aircraft systems [that are] capable of reconnaissance, electronic intelligence, and jamming [including the] FT-5 and FlyEye in co-operation with loitering munitions systems Warmate and Warmate 2,” Remigiusz Wilk, head of communications at WB Group, told Janes on 15 September.

“WB Group's UASs features artificial intelligence [AI] to support navigation, stack, and attack capabilities,” added Wilk.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/israel-rejects-uae-f-35-buy-part-of-peace-agreement/

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emira...

Israel rejects UAE F-35 buy part of peace agreement

by Gareth Jennings

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) includes any reference to lifting restrictions on arms sales to the Gulf state in general, and on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in particular.

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) issued its statement on 18 August, refuting claims circulating in the media and elsewhere that the deal with the UAE announced five days prior included the sale of any weapons that are currently restricted due to Washington’s long-standing pledge to maintain Israel’s military qualitative edge.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army's ‘light tank' competition enters limited user-testing phase

by Ashley Roque

A representation of BAE Systems' MPF prototype that is designed for three crew members. (BAE Systems )

The US Army intends to decide which company will build its new ‘light tank' in the April-to-June 2022 timeframe and is currently conducting a limited user test with two different prototypes to help guide this decision.

Ashley John, the Public Affairs Director for the army's Program Executive Office for Ground Combat Systems, gave Janes an update of the service's Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) competition that involves evaluating 12 prototypes built by BAE Systems and another dozen from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS).

Each company received a contract valued up to USD376 million to build its respective MPF vehicle lot with the initial expectation that all prototypes would be delivered to the army between March 2020 and the end of August 2020. However, neither company met this timetable. The army attributed these delays to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and other supply and integration issues.

GDLS delivered its 12th and final prototype to the army at the end of December 2020.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


WB Group unveils W2MPIR swarming UAV system

by Jakub Link-Lenczowski

W2MPIR's main components: FT-5, FlyEye, and Warmate presented during the MSPO 2021 in Kielce. (Jakub Link-Lenczowski)

Polsnd's WB Group is pushing its new W2MPIR swarming unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system, which it says is designed to defeat an adversary's layered air defences.

The system comprises the company's FlyEye and FT-5 Łoś (Moose) tactical reconnaissance UAVs, as well as Warmate 1 (3.0) and Warmate 2 loitering munitions. These are controlled by the Topaz integrated combat management system (ICMS).

WB Group is also offering its encrypted low-emission Silent Radio Network suite – derived from the Perad radios suppled by subsidiary Radmor – to support communications between W2MPIR nodes.

“The main advantage of the W2MPIR system is the combination of Silent Radio Network communication system and Topaz [ICMS] unmanned aircraft systems [that are] capable of reconnaissance, electronic intelligence, and jamming [including the] FT-5 and FlyEye in co-operation with loitering munitions systems Warmate and Warmate 2,” Remigiusz Wilk, head of communications at WB Group, told Janes on 15 September.

“WB Group's UASs features artificial intelligence [AI] to support navigation, stack, and attack capabilities,” added Wilk.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/israel-rejects-uae-f-35-buy-part-of-peace-agreement/

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emira...

Israel rejects UAE F-35 buy part of peace agreement

by Gareth Jennings

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) includes any reference to lifting restrictions on arms sales to the Gulf state in general, and on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in particular.

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) issued its statement on 18 August, refuting claims circulating in the media and elsewhere that the deal with the UAE announced five days prior included the sale of any weapons that are currently restricted due to Washington’s long-standing pledge to maintain Israel’s military qualitative edge.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army's ‘light tank' competition enters limited user-testing phase

by Ashley Roque

A representation of BAE Systems' MPF prototype that is designed for three crew members. (BAE Systems )

The US Army intends to decide which company will build its new ‘light tank' in the April-to-June 2022 timeframe and is currently conducting a limited user test with two different prototypes to help guide this decision.

Ashley John, the Public Affairs Director for the army's Program Executive Office for Ground Combat Systems, gave Janes an update of the service's Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) competition that involves evaluating 12 prototypes built by BAE Systems and another dozen from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS).

Each company received a contract valued up to USD376 million to build its respective MPF vehicle lot with the initial expectation that all prototypes would be delivered to the army between March 2020 and the end of August 2020. However, neither company met this timetable. The army attributed these delays to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and other supply and integration issues.

GDLS delivered its 12th and final prototype to the army at the end of December 2020.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


WB Group unveils W2MPIR swarming UAV system

by Jakub Link-Lenczowski

W2MPIR's main components: FT-5, FlyEye, and Warmate presented during the MSPO 2021 in Kielce. (Jakub Link-Lenczowski)

Polsnd's WB Group is pushing its new W2MPIR swarming unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system, which it says is designed to defeat an adversary's layered air defences.

The system comprises the company's FlyEye and FT-5 Łoś (Moose) tactical reconnaissance UAVs, as well as Warmate 1 (3.0) and Warmate 2 loitering munitions. These are controlled by the Topaz integrated combat management system (ICMS).

WB Group is also offering its encrypted low-emission Silent Radio Network suite – derived from the Perad radios suppled by subsidiary Radmor – to support communications between W2MPIR nodes.

“The main advantage of the W2MPIR system is the combination of Silent Radio Network communication system and Topaz [ICMS] unmanned aircraft systems [that are] capable of reconnaissance, electronic intelligence, and jamming [including the] FT-5 and FlyEye in co-operation with loitering munitions systems Warmate and Warmate 2,” Remigiusz Wilk, head of communications at WB Group, told Janes on 15 September.

“WB Group's UASs features artificial intelligence [AI] to support navigation, stack, and attack capabilities,” added Wilk.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/israel-rejects-uae-f-35-buy-part-of-peace-agreement/

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emira...

Israel rejects UAE F-35 buy part of peace agreement

by Gareth Jennings

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) includes any reference to lifting restrictions on arms sales to the Gulf state in general, and on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in particular.

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) issued its statement on 18 August, refuting claims circulating in the media and elsewhere that the deal with the UAE announced five days prior included the sale of any weapons that are currently restricted due to Washington’s long-standing pledge to maintain Israel’s military qualitative edge.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army's ‘light tank' competition enters limited user-testing phase

by Ashley Roque

A representation of BAE Systems' MPF prototype that is designed for three crew members. (BAE Systems )

The US Army intends to decide which company will build its new ‘light tank' in the April-to-June 2022 timeframe and is currently conducting a limited user test with two different prototypes to help guide this decision.

Ashley John, the Public Affairs Director for the army's Program Executive Office for Ground Combat Systems, gave Janes an update of the service's Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) competition that involves evaluating 12 prototypes built by BAE Systems and another dozen from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS).

Each company received a contract valued up to USD376 million to build its respective MPF vehicle lot with the initial expectation that all prototypes would be delivered to the army between March 2020 and the end of August 2020. However, neither company met this timetable. The army attributed these delays to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and other supply and integration issues.

GDLS delivered its 12th and final prototype to the army at the end of December 2020.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


WB Group unveils W2MPIR swarming UAV system

by Jakub Link-Lenczowski

W2MPIR's main components: FT-5, FlyEye, and Warmate presented during the MSPO 2021 in Kielce. (Jakub Link-Lenczowski)

Polsnd's WB Group is pushing its new W2MPIR swarming unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system, which it says is designed to defeat an adversary's layered air defences.

The system comprises the company's FlyEye and FT-5 Łoś (Moose) tactical reconnaissance UAVs, as well as Warmate 1 (3.0) and Warmate 2 loitering munitions. These are controlled by the Topaz integrated combat management system (ICMS).

WB Group is also offering its encrypted low-emission Silent Radio Network suite – derived from the Perad radios suppled by subsidiary Radmor – to support communications between W2MPIR nodes.

“The main advantage of the W2MPIR system is the combination of Silent Radio Network communication system and Topaz [ICMS] unmanned aircraft systems [that are] capable of reconnaissance, electronic intelligence, and jamming [including the] FT-5 and FlyEye in co-operation with loitering munitions systems Warmate and Warmate 2,” Remigiusz Wilk, head of communications at WB Group, told Janes on 15 September.

“WB Group's UASs features artificial intelligence [AI] to support navigation, stack, and attack capabilities,” added Wilk.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/israel-rejects-uae-f-35-buy-part-of-peace-agreement/

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emira...

Israel rejects UAE F-35 buy part of peace agreement

by Gareth Jennings

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) includes any reference to lifting restrictions on arms sales to the Gulf state in general, and on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in particular.

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

With the F-35 providing the IAF’s qualitative military edge, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has opposed the sale to any country in the Middle East, including Arab countries that have peace agreements with the State of Israel. (Israeli Air Force)

The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) issued its statement on 18 August, refuting claims circulating in the media and elsewhere that the deal with the UAE announced five days prior included the sale of any weapons that are currently restricted due to Washington’s long-standing pledge to maintain Israel’s military qualitative edge.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army's ‘light tank' competition enters limited user-testing phase

by Ashley Roque

A representation of BAE Systems' MPF prototype that is designed for three crew members. (BAE Systems )

The US Army intends to decide which company will build its new ‘light tank' in the April-to-June 2022 timeframe and is currently conducting a limited user test with two different prototypes to help guide this decision.

Ashley John, the Public Affairs Director for the army's Program Executive Office for Ground Combat Systems, gave Janes an update of the service's Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) competition that involves evaluating 12 prototypes built by BAE Systems and another dozen from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS).

Each company received a contract valued up to USD376 million to build its respective MPF vehicle lot with the initial expectation that all prototypes would be delivered to the army between March 2020 and the end of August 2020. However, neither company met this timetable. The army attributed these delays to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and other supply and integration issues.

GDLS delivered its 12th and final prototype to the army at the end of December 2020.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


WB Group unveils W2MPIR swarming UAV system

by Jakub Link-Lenczowski

W2MPIR's main components: FT-5, FlyEye, and Warmate presented during the MSPO 2021 in Kielce. (Jakub Link-Lenczowski)

Polsnd's WB Group is pushing its new W2MPIR swarming unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system, which it says is designed to defeat an adversary's layered air defences.

The system comprises the company's FlyEye and FT-5 Łoś (Moose) tactical reconnaissance UAVs, as well as Warmate 1 (3.0) and Warmate 2 loitering munitions. These are controlled by the Topaz integrated combat management system (ICMS).

WB Group is also offering its encrypted low-emission Silent Radio Network suite – derived from the Perad radios suppled by subsidiary Radmor – to support communications between W2MPIR nodes.

“The main advantage of the W2MPIR system is the combination of Silent Radio Network communication system and Topaz [ICMS] unmanned aircraft systems [that are] capable of reconnaissance, electronic intelligence, and jamming [including the] FT-5 and FlyEye in co-operation with loitering munitions systems Warmate and Warmate 2,” Remigiusz Wilk, head of communications at WB Group, told Janes on 15 September.

“WB Group's UASs features artificial intelligence [AI] to support navigation, stack, and attack capabilities,” added Wilk.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/israel-rejects-uae-f-35-buy-part-of-peace-agreement/

Israel has strongly rejected the notion that its historic peace agreement with the United Arab Emira...

Request Consultation

Request a free consultation to discover how Janes can provide you with assured, interconnected open-source intelligence.

News Janes | The latest defence and security news from Janes - the trusted source for defence intelligence