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Iranian IRGC consolidates primacy in intelligence operations

by Eric Randolph

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO) has gained increasing dominance over the domestic security sphere in Iran. Under the direct control of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, it has targeted officials, journalists, lawyers, activists, and dual nationals, severely undermining the policies and status of successive elected governments. In doing so, it has encroached upon, and in many respects sidelined, the government’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS).

The creation of the IRGC-IO came shortly after the disputed re-election of then-president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009 and the mass ‘Green Movement’ protests that followed and lasted until February 2010. These were viewed as an existential threat to the revolutionary system, requiring an overhaul of the country’s intelligence services. This proximate cause dovetailed with the long-term desire of Khamenei and his allies in the IRGC leadership to assume greater control over the instruments of coercion and power within Iran’s complex and often overlapping structures, making the intelligence apparatus more opaque and less accountable to elected officials.

Janes has interviewed individuals who have dealt directly with the IRGC-IO, and they depict an organisation imbued with a conspiratorial mindset rooted in Khamenei’s frequently stated belief that the West is seeking to undermine and overthrow the Islamic Republic through ‘infiltration’ and cultural subversion. The IRGC-IO’s agents are viewed as less educated and professional than their MOIS counterparts and less able to discern true threats to the system.

Iranians set fire to a US flag during an anti-US rally following Friday prayers in Tehran on 12 April 2019. On 8 April, the US government had designated the IRGC as a terrorist organisation, the first such designation for a foreign government entity. (Rouzbeh Fouladi/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/iranian-irgc-consolidates-primacy-in-intelligence-operations/

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO...

Iranian IRGC consolidates primacy in intelligence operations

by Eric Randolph

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO) has gained increasing dominance over the domestic security sphere in Iran. Under the direct control of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, it has targeted officials, journalists, lawyers, activists, and dual nationals, severely undermining the policies and status of successive elected governments. In doing so, it has encroached upon, and in many respects sidelined, the government’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS).

The creation of the IRGC-IO came shortly after the disputed re-election of then-president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009 and the mass ‘Green Movement’ protests that followed and lasted until February 2010. These were viewed as an existential threat to the revolutionary system, requiring an overhaul of the country’s intelligence services. This proximate cause dovetailed with the long-term desire of Khamenei and his allies in the IRGC leadership to assume greater control over the instruments of coercion and power within Iran’s complex and often overlapping structures, making the intelligence apparatus more opaque and less accountable to elected officials.

Janes

Iranians set fire to a US flag during an anti-US rally following Friday prayers in Tehran on 12 April 2019. On 8 April, the US government had designated the IRGC as a terrorist organisation, the first such designation for a foreign government entity. (Rouzbeh Fouladi/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


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US Army recompetes CROWS contract, royalty fee attached for outside vendor

by Ashley Roque

A US Army Robotic Combat Vehicle-Light (RCV-L) prototype outfitted with CROWS-J. The service is currently hosting a CROWS recompete competition. (US Army)

The US Army has launched a Common Remotely Operating Weapon Station (CROWS) competition valued up to USD1.5 billion that allows companies other than the prime contractor, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, to vie for the deal. However, there is a caveat; other vendors must factor in a mandatory USD10,000 per system royalty fee for Kongsberg if they win.

In late August, the service issued a remote weapon station (RWS) request for procurement to cover continued support for fielded CROWS systems and for new designs. In essence, the service is asking vendors whether they can build the Norwegian company's RWS at a ‘better value' to the government.

“The programme will support new and emerging customer requirements to include RWS variants such as Abrams Low Profile, Navy Mk-50, United States Marine Corps (USMC) Amphibious Remote Weapon Station (ARWS), and Stryker,” the army wrote. Parties interested in bidding on the contract have until 22 November to submit their proposals and the service anticipates awarding a single contract worth up to USD1.5 billion.


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USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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CPI to buy L3Harris radome business

by Marc Selinger

US-based Communications & Power Industries (CPI) has agreed to acquire L3Harris Technologies' Electronic Space Systems Corporation (ESSCO), saying the ground radome manufacturer will complement its airborne and shipboard radome business.

ESSCO makes radomes that protect satellite communications antennas, military and commercial radars, and telemetry systems from strong winds, snow, and other harsh environmental conditions. The radomes range in diameter from 6–200 ft (1.8–61 m).

ESSCO is based in Massachusetts and has about 85 employees. CPI said on 6 September that it expects to close the acquisition before the end of this calendar year . Financial terms were not disclosed.

The announcement came about two months after CPI acquired TMD Technologies, which makes microwave tubes, high-voltage power equipment, and transmitters used in radar, electronic warfare, communications, and other applications. In 2020 CPI acquired General Dynamics' SATCOM Technologies business, which makes large ground station antennas for geostationary satellites.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/iranian-irgc-consolidates-primacy-in-intelligence-operations/

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO...

Iranian IRGC consolidates primacy in intelligence operations

by Eric Randolph

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO) has gained increasing dominance over the domestic security sphere in Iran. Under the direct control of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, it has targeted officials, journalists, lawyers, activists, and dual nationals, severely undermining the policies and status of successive elected governments. In doing so, it has encroached upon, and in many respects sidelined, the government’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS).

The creation of the IRGC-IO came shortly after the disputed re-election of then-president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009 and the mass ‘Green Movement’ protests that followed and lasted until February 2010. These were viewed as an existential threat to the revolutionary system, requiring an overhaul of the country’s intelligence services. This proximate cause dovetailed with the long-term desire of Khamenei and his allies in the IRGC leadership to assume greater control over the instruments of coercion and power within Iran’s complex and often overlapping structures, making the intelligence apparatus more opaque and less accountable to elected officials.

Janes

Iranians set fire to a US flag during an anti-US rally following Friday prayers in Tehran on 12 April 2019. On 8 April, the US government had designated the IRGC as a terrorist organisation, the first such designation for a foreign government entity. (Rouzbeh Fouladi/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


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US Army recompetes CROWS contract, royalty fee attached for outside vendor

by Ashley Roque

A US Army Robotic Combat Vehicle-Light (RCV-L) prototype outfitted with CROWS-J. The service is currently hosting a CROWS recompete competition. (US Army)

The US Army has launched a Common Remotely Operating Weapon Station (CROWS) competition valued up to USD1.5 billion that allows companies other than the prime contractor, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, to vie for the deal. However, there is a caveat; other vendors must factor in a mandatory USD10,000 per system royalty fee for Kongsberg if they win.

In late August, the service issued a remote weapon station (RWS) request for procurement to cover continued support for fielded CROWS systems and for new designs. In essence, the service is asking vendors whether they can build the Norwegian company's RWS at a ‘better value' to the government.

“The programme will support new and emerging customer requirements to include RWS variants such as Abrams Low Profile, Navy Mk-50, United States Marine Corps (USMC) Amphibious Remote Weapon Station (ARWS), and Stryker,” the army wrote. Parties interested in bidding on the contract have until 22 November to submit their proposals and the service anticipates awarding a single contract worth up to USD1.5 billion.


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USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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CPI to buy L3Harris radome business

by Marc Selinger

US-based Communications & Power Industries (CPI) has agreed to acquire L3Harris Technologies' Electronic Space Systems Corporation (ESSCO), saying the ground radome manufacturer will complement its airborne and shipboard radome business.

ESSCO makes radomes that protect satellite communications antennas, military and commercial radars, and telemetry systems from strong winds, snow, and other harsh environmental conditions. The radomes range in diameter from 6–200 ft (1.8–61 m).

ESSCO is based in Massachusetts and has about 85 employees. CPI said on 6 September that it expects to close the acquisition before the end of this calendar year . Financial terms were not disclosed.

The announcement came about two months after CPI acquired TMD Technologies, which makes microwave tubes, high-voltage power equipment, and transmitters used in radar, electronic warfare, communications, and other applications. In 2020 CPI acquired General Dynamics' SATCOM Technologies business, which makes large ground station antennas for geostationary satellites.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/iranian-irgc-consolidates-primacy-in-intelligence-operations/

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO...

Iranian IRGC consolidates primacy in intelligence operations

by Eric Randolph

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO) has gained increasing dominance over the domestic security sphere in Iran. Under the direct control of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, it has targeted officials, journalists, lawyers, activists, and dual nationals, severely undermining the policies and status of successive elected governments. In doing so, it has encroached upon, and in many respects sidelined, the government’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS).

The creation of the IRGC-IO came shortly after the disputed re-election of then-president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009 and the mass ‘Green Movement’ protests that followed and lasted until February 2010. These were viewed as an existential threat to the revolutionary system, requiring an overhaul of the country’s intelligence services. This proximate cause dovetailed with the long-term desire of Khamenei and his allies in the IRGC leadership to assume greater control over the instruments of coercion and power within Iran’s complex and often overlapping structures, making the intelligence apparatus more opaque and less accountable to elected officials.

Janes

Iranians set fire to a US flag during an anti-US rally following Friday prayers in Tehran on 12 April 2019. On 8 April, the US government had designated the IRGC as a terrorist organisation, the first such designation for a foreign government entity. (Rouzbeh Fouladi/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army recompetes CROWS contract, royalty fee attached for outside vendor

by Ashley Roque

A US Army Robotic Combat Vehicle-Light (RCV-L) prototype outfitted with CROWS-J. The service is currently hosting a CROWS recompete competition. (US Army)

The US Army has launched a Common Remotely Operating Weapon Station (CROWS) competition valued up to USD1.5 billion that allows companies other than the prime contractor, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, to vie for the deal. However, there is a caveat; other vendors must factor in a mandatory USD10,000 per system royalty fee for Kongsberg if they win.

In late August, the service issued a remote weapon station (RWS) request for procurement to cover continued support for fielded CROWS systems and for new designs. In essence, the service is asking vendors whether they can build the Norwegian company's RWS at a ‘better value' to the government.

“The programme will support new and emerging customer requirements to include RWS variants such as Abrams Low Profile, Navy Mk-50, United States Marine Corps (USMC) Amphibious Remote Weapon Station (ARWS), and Stryker,” the army wrote. Parties interested in bidding on the contract have until 22 November to submit their proposals and the service anticipates awarding a single contract worth up to USD1.5 billion.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


CPI to buy L3Harris radome business

by Marc Selinger

US-based Communications & Power Industries (CPI) has agreed to acquire L3Harris Technologies' Electronic Space Systems Corporation (ESSCO), saying the ground radome manufacturer will complement its airborne and shipboard radome business.

ESSCO makes radomes that protect satellite communications antennas, military and commercial radars, and telemetry systems from strong winds, snow, and other harsh environmental conditions. The radomes range in diameter from 6–200 ft (1.8–61 m).

ESSCO is based in Massachusetts and has about 85 employees. CPI said on 6 September that it expects to close the acquisition before the end of this calendar year . Financial terms were not disclosed.

The announcement came about two months after CPI acquired TMD Technologies, which makes microwave tubes, high-voltage power equipment, and transmitters used in radar, electronic warfare, communications, and other applications. In 2020 CPI acquired General Dynamics' SATCOM Technologies business, which makes large ground station antennas for geostationary satellites.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/iranian-irgc-consolidates-primacy-in-intelligence-operations/

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO...

Iranian IRGC consolidates primacy in intelligence operations

by Eric Randolph

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO) has gained increasing dominance over the domestic security sphere in Iran. Under the direct control of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, it has targeted officials, journalists, lawyers, activists, and dual nationals, severely undermining the policies and status of successive elected governments. In doing so, it has encroached upon, and in many respects sidelined, the government’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS).

The creation of the IRGC-IO came shortly after the disputed re-election of then-president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009 and the mass ‘Green Movement’ protests that followed and lasted until February 2010. These were viewed as an existential threat to the revolutionary system, requiring an overhaul of the country’s intelligence services. This proximate cause dovetailed with the long-term desire of Khamenei and his allies in the IRGC leadership to assume greater control over the instruments of coercion and power within Iran’s complex and often overlapping structures, making the intelligence apparatus more opaque and less accountable to elected officials.

Janes

Iranians set fire to a US flag during an anti-US rally following Friday prayers in Tehran on 12 April 2019. On 8 April, the US government had designated the IRGC as a terrorist organisation, the first such designation for a foreign government entity. (Rouzbeh Fouladi/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army recompetes CROWS contract, royalty fee attached for outside vendor

by Ashley Roque

A US Army Robotic Combat Vehicle-Light (RCV-L) prototype outfitted with CROWS-J. The service is currently hosting a CROWS recompete competition. (US Army)

The US Army has launched a Common Remotely Operating Weapon Station (CROWS) competition valued up to USD1.5 billion that allows companies other than the prime contractor, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, to vie for the deal. However, there is a caveat; other vendors must factor in a mandatory USD10,000 per system royalty fee for Kongsberg if they win.

In late August, the service issued a remote weapon station (RWS) request for procurement to cover continued support for fielded CROWS systems and for new designs. In essence, the service is asking vendors whether they can build the Norwegian company's RWS at a ‘better value' to the government.

“The programme will support new and emerging customer requirements to include RWS variants such as Abrams Low Profile, Navy Mk-50, United States Marine Corps (USMC) Amphibious Remote Weapon Station (ARWS), and Stryker,” the army wrote. Parties interested in bidding on the contract have until 22 November to submit their proposals and the service anticipates awarding a single contract worth up to USD1.5 billion.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


CPI to buy L3Harris radome business

by Marc Selinger

US-based Communications & Power Industries (CPI) has agreed to acquire L3Harris Technologies' Electronic Space Systems Corporation (ESSCO), saying the ground radome manufacturer will complement its airborne and shipboard radome business.

ESSCO makes radomes that protect satellite communications antennas, military and commercial radars, and telemetry systems from strong winds, snow, and other harsh environmental conditions. The radomes range in diameter from 6–200 ft (1.8–61 m).

ESSCO is based in Massachusetts and has about 85 employees. CPI said on 6 September that it expects to close the acquisition before the end of this calendar year . Financial terms were not disclosed.

The announcement came about two months after CPI acquired TMD Technologies, which makes microwave tubes, high-voltage power equipment, and transmitters used in radar, electronic warfare, communications, and other applications. In 2020 CPI acquired General Dynamics' SATCOM Technologies business, which makes large ground station antennas for geostationary satellites.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/iranian-irgc-consolidates-primacy-in-intelligence-operations/

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO...

Iranian IRGC consolidates primacy in intelligence operations

by Eric Randolph

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO) has gained increasing dominance over the domestic security sphere in Iran. Under the direct control of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, it has targeted officials, journalists, lawyers, activists, and dual nationals, severely undermining the policies and status of successive elected governments. In doing so, it has encroached upon, and in many respects sidelined, the government’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS).

The creation of the IRGC-IO came shortly after the disputed re-election of then-president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009 and the mass ‘Green Movement’ protests that followed and lasted until February 2010. These were viewed as an existential threat to the revolutionary system, requiring an overhaul of the country’s intelligence services. This proximate cause dovetailed with the long-term desire of Khamenei and his allies in the IRGC leadership to assume greater control over the instruments of coercion and power within Iran’s complex and often overlapping structures, making the intelligence apparatus more opaque and less accountable to elected officials.

Janes

Iranians set fire to a US flag during an anti-US rally following Friday prayers in Tehran on 12 April 2019. On 8 April, the US government had designated the IRGC as a terrorist organisation, the first such designation for a foreign government entity. (Rouzbeh Fouladi/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army recompetes CROWS contract, royalty fee attached for outside vendor

by Ashley Roque

A US Army Robotic Combat Vehicle-Light (RCV-L) prototype outfitted with CROWS-J. The service is currently hosting a CROWS recompete competition. (US Army)

The US Army has launched a Common Remotely Operating Weapon Station (CROWS) competition valued up to USD1.5 billion that allows companies other than the prime contractor, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, to vie for the deal. However, there is a caveat; other vendors must factor in a mandatory USD10,000 per system royalty fee for Kongsberg if they win.

In late August, the service issued a remote weapon station (RWS) request for procurement to cover continued support for fielded CROWS systems and for new designs. In essence, the service is asking vendors whether they can build the Norwegian company's RWS at a ‘better value' to the government.

“The programme will support new and emerging customer requirements to include RWS variants such as Abrams Low Profile, Navy Mk-50, United States Marine Corps (USMC) Amphibious Remote Weapon Station (ARWS), and Stryker,” the army wrote. Parties interested in bidding on the contract have until 22 November to submit their proposals and the service anticipates awarding a single contract worth up to USD1.5 billion.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


CPI to buy L3Harris radome business

by Marc Selinger

US-based Communications & Power Industries (CPI) has agreed to acquire L3Harris Technologies' Electronic Space Systems Corporation (ESSCO), saying the ground radome manufacturer will complement its airborne and shipboard radome business.

ESSCO makes radomes that protect satellite communications antennas, military and commercial radars, and telemetry systems from strong winds, snow, and other harsh environmental conditions. The radomes range in diameter from 6–200 ft (1.8–61 m).

ESSCO is based in Massachusetts and has about 85 employees. CPI said on 6 September that it expects to close the acquisition before the end of this calendar year . Financial terms were not disclosed.

The announcement came about two months after CPI acquired TMD Technologies, which makes microwave tubes, high-voltage power equipment, and transmitters used in radar, electronic warfare, communications, and other applications. In 2020 CPI acquired General Dynamics' SATCOM Technologies business, which makes large ground station antennas for geostationary satellites.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/iranian-irgc-consolidates-primacy-in-intelligence-operations/

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO...

Iranian IRGC consolidates primacy in intelligence operations

by Eric Randolph

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO) has gained increasing dominance over the domestic security sphere in Iran. Under the direct control of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, it has targeted officials, journalists, lawyers, activists, and dual nationals, severely undermining the policies and status of successive elected governments. In doing so, it has encroached upon, and in many respects sidelined, the government’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS).

The creation of the IRGC-IO came shortly after the disputed re-election of then-president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009 and the mass ‘Green Movement’ protests that followed and lasted until February 2010. These were viewed as an existential threat to the revolutionary system, requiring an overhaul of the country’s intelligence services. This proximate cause dovetailed with the long-term desire of Khamenei and his allies in the IRGC leadership to assume greater control over the instruments of coercion and power within Iran’s complex and often overlapping structures, making the intelligence apparatus more opaque and less accountable to elected officials.

Janes

Iranians set fire to a US flag during an anti-US rally following Friday prayers in Tehran on 12 April 2019. On 8 April, the US government had designated the IRGC as a terrorist organisation, the first such designation for a foreign government entity. (Rouzbeh Fouladi/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Army recompetes CROWS contract, royalty fee attached for outside vendor

by Ashley Roque

A US Army Robotic Combat Vehicle-Light (RCV-L) prototype outfitted with CROWS-J. The service is currently hosting a CROWS recompete competition. (US Army)

The US Army has launched a Common Remotely Operating Weapon Station (CROWS) competition valued up to USD1.5 billion that allows companies other than the prime contractor, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, to vie for the deal. However, there is a caveat; other vendors must factor in a mandatory USD10,000 per system royalty fee for Kongsberg if they win.

In late August, the service issued a remote weapon station (RWS) request for procurement to cover continued support for fielded CROWS systems and for new designs. In essence, the service is asking vendors whether they can build the Norwegian company's RWS at a ‘better value' to the government.

“The programme will support new and emerging customer requirements to include RWS variants such as Abrams Low Profile, Navy Mk-50, United States Marine Corps (USMC) Amphibious Remote Weapon Station (ARWS), and Stryker,” the army wrote. Parties interested in bidding on the contract have until 22 November to submit their proposals and the service anticipates awarding a single contract worth up to USD1.5 billion.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


CPI to buy L3Harris radome business

by Marc Selinger

US-based Communications & Power Industries (CPI) has agreed to acquire L3Harris Technologies' Electronic Space Systems Corporation (ESSCO), saying the ground radome manufacturer will complement its airborne and shipboard radome business.

ESSCO makes radomes that protect satellite communications antennas, military and commercial radars, and telemetry systems from strong winds, snow, and other harsh environmental conditions. The radomes range in diameter from 6–200 ft (1.8–61 m).

ESSCO is based in Massachusetts and has about 85 employees. CPI said on 6 September that it expects to close the acquisition before the end of this calendar year . Financial terms were not disclosed.

The announcement came about two months after CPI acquired TMD Technologies, which makes microwave tubes, high-voltage power equipment, and transmitters used in radar, electronic warfare, communications, and other applications. In 2020 CPI acquired General Dynamics' SATCOM Technologies business, which makes large ground station antennas for geostationary satellites.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/iranian-irgc-consolidates-primacy-in-intelligence-operations/

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO...

Iranian IRGC consolidates primacy in intelligence operations

by Eric Randolph

Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO) has gained increasing dominance over the domestic security sphere in Iran. Under the direct control of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, it has targeted officials, journalists, lawyers, activists, and dual nationals, severely undermining the policies and status of successive elected governments. In doing so, it has encroached upon, and in many respects sidelined, the government’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS).

The creation of the IRGC-IO came shortly after the disputed re-election of then-president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009 and the mass ‘Green Movement’ protests that followed and lasted until February 2010. These were viewed as an existential threat to the revolutionary system, requiring an overhaul of the country’s intelligence services. This proximate cause dovetailed with the long-term desire of Khamenei and his allies in the IRGC leadership to assume greater control over the instruments of coercion and power within Iran’s complex and often overlapping structures, making the intelligence apparatus more opaque and less accountable to elected officials.

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Iranians set fire to a US flag during an anti-US rally following Friday prayers in Tehran on 12 April 2019. On 8 April, the US government had designated the IRGC as a terrorist organisation, the first such designation for a foreign government entity. (Rouzbeh Fouladi/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


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US Army recompetes CROWS contract, royalty fee attached for outside vendor

by Ashley Roque

A US Army Robotic Combat Vehicle-Light (RCV-L) prototype outfitted with CROWS-J. The service is currently hosting a CROWS recompete competition. (US Army)

The US Army has launched a Common Remotely Operating Weapon Station (CROWS) competition valued up to USD1.5 billion that allows companies other than the prime contractor, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, to vie for the deal. However, there is a caveat; other vendors must factor in a mandatory USD10,000 per system royalty fee for Kongsberg if they win.

In late August, the service issued a remote weapon station (RWS) request for procurement to cover continued support for fielded CROWS systems and for new designs. In essence, the service is asking vendors whether they can build the Norwegian company's RWS at a ‘better value' to the government.

“The programme will support new and emerging customer requirements to include RWS variants such as Abrams Low Profile, Navy Mk-50, United States Marine Corps (USMC) Amphibious Remote Weapon Station (ARWS), and Stryker,” the army wrote. Parties interested in bidding on the contract have until 22 November to submit their proposals and the service anticipates awarding a single contract worth up to USD1.5 billion.


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USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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CPI to buy L3Harris radome business

by Marc Selinger

US-based Communications & Power Industries (CPI) has agreed to acquire L3Harris Technologies' Electronic Space Systems Corporation (ESSCO), saying the ground radome manufacturer will complement its airborne and shipboard radome business.

ESSCO makes radomes that protect satellite communications antennas, military and commercial radars, and telemetry systems from strong winds, snow, and other harsh environmental conditions. The radomes range in diameter from 6–200 ft (1.8–61 m).

ESSCO is based in Massachusetts and has about 85 employees. CPI said on 6 September that it expects to close the acquisition before the end of this calendar year . Financial terms were not disclosed.

The announcement came about two months after CPI acquired TMD Technologies, which makes microwave tubes, high-voltage power equipment, and transmitters used in radar, electronic warfare, communications, and other applications. In 2020 CPI acquired General Dynamics' SATCOM Technologies business, which makes large ground station antennas for geostationary satellites.


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Since its formation in 2009, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps - Intelligence Organisation (IRGC-IO...

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