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Greek and Turkish warships collide in the Aegean Sea

by John Pagni & Kerry Herschelman

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Mediterranean on 12 August.

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August.  (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August. (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The incident occurred amid rising tensions between the two countries after Turkey dispatched a geological survey vessel, Oruç Reis, to chart an area claimed by both sides for possible hydrocarbon deposits accompanied by five Turkish warships.

When the expedition was first announced, the backlash from NATO, the EU, US, and the UK appeared to force a re-think in Ankara, only for the flotilla to re-start its mission on 10 August between Crete, Cyprus, and around the small isolated Greek island of Kastellorizo, which is 2 km off the Turkish coast but 125 km east of Rodos, the nearest Greek territory. During its excursions, Oruç Reis has been shadowed by several Greek frigates.

On 12 August, the Hellenic Navy’s 3,500-tonne Ellis-class frigate Limnos (F 451) reportedly made contact when its bow touched the stern of the Turkish 3,100-tonne Barbaros-class frigate TCG Kemalreis (F 247). Greek defence ministry officials described the incident as “an accidental mini-collision” that was caused by the Greek ship’s manoeuvre to avoid a head-on collision. Turkey, however, has described it as a “provocation”.

Although there were rumours and news reports of serious damage to one or both ships, causing a return to port, these have proved unfounded and both ships remain operational at sea. Following the incident, Limnos continued on its voyage to take part in a joint exercise with another Greek warship and two French Navy ships, while Oruç Reis’s mission is set to continue until 23 August.

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/greek-and-turkish-warships-collide-in-the-aegean-sea/

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Medi...

Greek and Turkish warships collide in the Aegean Sea

by John Pagni & Kerry Herschelman

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Mediterranean on 12 August.

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August.  (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August. (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The incident occurred amid rising tensions between the two countries after Turkey dispatched a geological survey vessel, Oruç Reis, to chart an area claimed by both sides for possible hydrocarbon deposits accompanied by five Turkish warships.

When the expedition was first announced, the backlash from NATO, the EU, US, and the UK appeared to force a re-think in Ankara, only for the flotilla to re-start its mission on 10 August between Crete, Cyprus, and around the small isolated Greek island of Kastellorizo, which is 2 km off the Turkish coast but 125 km east of Rodos, the nearest Greek territory. During its excursions, Oruç Reis has been shadowed by several Greek frigates.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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DSEI 2021: Hanwha Defence unveils K9 SPH developmental roadmap

by Mark Cazalet

A mockup of the K9A2 SPH shown at DSEI 2021. (Hanwha Defence)

Hanwha Defence has outlined its K9 Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH) development roadmap, laying out plans for three new variants beyond the baseline K9 and K9A1 minor upgrade variants that are currently in service.

A Hanwha Defence representative told Janes at the 2021 DSEI exhibition, which was held in London from 14 to 17 September, the K9A2 was the first variant that the company was developing and this would be fitted within a fundamentally new turret, a fully automatic ammo loading system, and an improved fire control system to enable automatic gunlaying onto targets assigned by a command-and-control system.

The new variant will also have a higher sustained rate of fire. Yoon Young-ki, principal engineer in the K9A2 development project, said, “The development of a full-automatic ammunition handling and loading system has been very successful to increase rate of fire to 9 from 6 rds/min.”


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DSEI 2021: Sweden modernises its CB90 fast attack craft fleet

by Nicholas Fiorenza

Saab leased one of Sweden's CB90 NG fast attack craft to show it at DSEI 2021. (Saab)

Sweden is modernising its fast attack craft fleet with the Combat Boat 90 Next Generation, which Saab is showcasing for the first time abroad at Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) 2021, being held in London from 14 to 17 September.

The CB90 NG includes a new combat management system and sensors for surveillance, ballistic protection, and a stabilised Trackfire remote weapon station with 50 calibre and 7.62 mm machine guns and the possibility of arming it with missiles in the future. Saab said the CB90 NG has improved stealth, manoeuvrability, and speed. On 17 September, the company took Janes for a ride on the Thames with the boat, which reached speeds of up to 40 kt, and demonstrated its very short breaking distance.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/greek-and-turkish-warships-collide-in-the-aegean-sea/

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Medi...

Greek and Turkish warships collide in the Aegean Sea

by John Pagni & Kerry Herschelman

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Mediterranean on 12 August.

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August.  (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August. (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The incident occurred amid rising tensions between the two countries after Turkey dispatched a geological survey vessel, Oruç Reis, to chart an area claimed by both sides for possible hydrocarbon deposits accompanied by five Turkish warships.

When the expedition was first announced, the backlash from NATO, the EU, US, and the UK appeared to force a re-think in Ankara, only for the flotilla to re-start its mission on 10 August between Crete, Cyprus, and around the small isolated Greek island of Kastellorizo, which is 2 km off the Turkish coast but 125 km east of Rodos, the nearest Greek territory. During its excursions, Oruç Reis has been shadowed by several Greek frigates.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Hanwha Defence unveils K9 SPH developmental roadmap

by Mark Cazalet

A mockup of the K9A2 SPH shown at DSEI 2021. (Hanwha Defence)

Hanwha Defence has outlined its K9 Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH) development roadmap, laying out plans for three new variants beyond the baseline K9 and K9A1 minor upgrade variants that are currently in service.

A Hanwha Defence representative told Janes at the 2021 DSEI exhibition, which was held in London from 14 to 17 September, the K9A2 was the first variant that the company was developing and this would be fitted within a fundamentally new turret, a fully automatic ammo loading system, and an improved fire control system to enable automatic gunlaying onto targets assigned by a command-and-control system.

The new variant will also have a higher sustained rate of fire. Yoon Young-ki, principal engineer in the K9A2 development project, said, “The development of a full-automatic ammunition handling and loading system has been very successful to increase rate of fire to 9 from 6 rds/min.”


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Sweden modernises its CB90 fast attack craft fleet

by Nicholas Fiorenza

Saab leased one of Sweden's CB90 NG fast attack craft to show it at DSEI 2021. (Saab)

Sweden is modernising its fast attack craft fleet with the Combat Boat 90 Next Generation, which Saab is showcasing for the first time abroad at Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) 2021, being held in London from 14 to 17 September.

The CB90 NG includes a new combat management system and sensors for surveillance, ballistic protection, and a stabilised Trackfire remote weapon station with 50 calibre and 7.62 mm machine guns and the possibility of arming it with missiles in the future. Saab said the CB90 NG has improved stealth, manoeuvrability, and speed. On 17 September, the company took Janes for a ride on the Thames with the boat, which reached speeds of up to 40 kt, and demonstrated its very short breaking distance.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/greek-and-turkish-warships-collide-in-the-aegean-sea/

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Medi...

Greek and Turkish warships collide in the Aegean Sea

by John Pagni & Kerry Herschelman

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Mediterranean on 12 August.

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August.  (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August. (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The incident occurred amid rising tensions between the two countries after Turkey dispatched a geological survey vessel, Oruç Reis, to chart an area claimed by both sides for possible hydrocarbon deposits accompanied by five Turkish warships.

When the expedition was first announced, the backlash from NATO, the EU, US, and the UK appeared to force a re-think in Ankara, only for the flotilla to re-start its mission on 10 August between Crete, Cyprus, and around the small isolated Greek island of Kastellorizo, which is 2 km off the Turkish coast but 125 km east of Rodos, the nearest Greek territory. During its excursions, Oruç Reis has been shadowed by several Greek frigates.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Hanwha Defence unveils K9 SPH developmental roadmap

by Mark Cazalet

A mockup of the K9A2 SPH shown at DSEI 2021. (Hanwha Defence)

Hanwha Defence has outlined its K9 Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH) development roadmap, laying out plans for three new variants beyond the baseline K9 and K9A1 minor upgrade variants that are currently in service.

A Hanwha Defence representative told Janes at the 2021 DSEI exhibition, which was held in London from 14 to 17 September, the K9A2 was the first variant that the company was developing and this would be fitted within a fundamentally new turret, a fully automatic ammo loading system, and an improved fire control system to enable automatic gunlaying onto targets assigned by a command-and-control system.

The new variant will also have a higher sustained rate of fire. Yoon Young-ki, principal engineer in the K9A2 development project, said, “The development of a full-automatic ammunition handling and loading system has been very successful to increase rate of fire to 9 from 6 rds/min.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Sweden modernises its CB90 fast attack craft fleet

by Nicholas Fiorenza

Saab leased one of Sweden's CB90 NG fast attack craft to show it at DSEI 2021. (Saab)

Sweden is modernising its fast attack craft fleet with the Combat Boat 90 Next Generation, which Saab is showcasing for the first time abroad at Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) 2021, being held in London from 14 to 17 September.

The CB90 NG includes a new combat management system and sensors for surveillance, ballistic protection, and a stabilised Trackfire remote weapon station with 50 calibre and 7.62 mm machine guns and the possibility of arming it with missiles in the future. Saab said the CB90 NG has improved stealth, manoeuvrability, and speed. On 17 September, the company took Janes for a ride on the Thames with the boat, which reached speeds of up to 40 kt, and demonstrated its very short breaking distance.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/greek-and-turkish-warships-collide-in-the-aegean-sea/

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Medi...

Greek and Turkish warships collide in the Aegean Sea

by John Pagni & Kerry Herschelman

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Mediterranean on 12 August.

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August.  (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August. (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The incident occurred amid rising tensions between the two countries after Turkey dispatched a geological survey vessel, Oruç Reis, to chart an area claimed by both sides for possible hydrocarbon deposits accompanied by five Turkish warships.

When the expedition was first announced, the backlash from NATO, the EU, US, and the UK appeared to force a re-think in Ankara, only for the flotilla to re-start its mission on 10 August between Crete, Cyprus, and around the small isolated Greek island of Kastellorizo, which is 2 km off the Turkish coast but 125 km east of Rodos, the nearest Greek territory. During its excursions, Oruç Reis has been shadowed by several Greek frigates.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Hanwha Defence unveils K9 SPH developmental roadmap

by Mark Cazalet

A mockup of the K9A2 SPH shown at DSEI 2021. (Hanwha Defence)

Hanwha Defence has outlined its K9 Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH) development roadmap, laying out plans for three new variants beyond the baseline K9 and K9A1 minor upgrade variants that are currently in service.

A Hanwha Defence representative told Janes at the 2021 DSEI exhibition, which was held in London from 14 to 17 September, the K9A2 was the first variant that the company was developing and this would be fitted within a fundamentally new turret, a fully automatic ammo loading system, and an improved fire control system to enable automatic gunlaying onto targets assigned by a command-and-control system.

The new variant will also have a higher sustained rate of fire. Yoon Young-ki, principal engineer in the K9A2 development project, said, “The development of a full-automatic ammunition handling and loading system has been very successful to increase rate of fire to 9 from 6 rds/min.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Sweden modernises its CB90 fast attack craft fleet

by Nicholas Fiorenza

Saab leased one of Sweden's CB90 NG fast attack craft to show it at DSEI 2021. (Saab)

Sweden is modernising its fast attack craft fleet with the Combat Boat 90 Next Generation, which Saab is showcasing for the first time abroad at Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) 2021, being held in London from 14 to 17 September.

The CB90 NG includes a new combat management system and sensors for surveillance, ballistic protection, and a stabilised Trackfire remote weapon station with 50 calibre and 7.62 mm machine guns and the possibility of arming it with missiles in the future. Saab said the CB90 NG has improved stealth, manoeuvrability, and speed. On 17 September, the company took Janes for a ride on the Thames with the boat, which reached speeds of up to 40 kt, and demonstrated its very short breaking distance.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/greek-and-turkish-warships-collide-in-the-aegean-sea/

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Medi...

Greek and Turkish warships collide in the Aegean Sea

by John Pagni & Kerry Herschelman

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Mediterranean on 12 August.

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August.  (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August. (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The incident occurred amid rising tensions between the two countries after Turkey dispatched a geological survey vessel, Oruç Reis, to chart an area claimed by both sides for possible hydrocarbon deposits accompanied by five Turkish warships.

When the expedition was first announced, the backlash from NATO, the EU, US, and the UK appeared to force a re-think in Ankara, only for the flotilla to re-start its mission on 10 August between Crete, Cyprus, and around the small isolated Greek island of Kastellorizo, which is 2 km off the Turkish coast but 125 km east of Rodos, the nearest Greek territory. During its excursions, Oruç Reis has been shadowed by several Greek frigates.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Hanwha Defence unveils K9 SPH developmental roadmap

by Mark Cazalet

A mockup of the K9A2 SPH shown at DSEI 2021. (Hanwha Defence)

Hanwha Defence has outlined its K9 Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH) development roadmap, laying out plans for three new variants beyond the baseline K9 and K9A1 minor upgrade variants that are currently in service.

A Hanwha Defence representative told Janes at the 2021 DSEI exhibition, which was held in London from 14 to 17 September, the K9A2 was the first variant that the company was developing and this would be fitted within a fundamentally new turret, a fully automatic ammo loading system, and an improved fire control system to enable automatic gunlaying onto targets assigned by a command-and-control system.

The new variant will also have a higher sustained rate of fire. Yoon Young-ki, principal engineer in the K9A2 development project, said, “The development of a full-automatic ammunition handling and loading system has been very successful to increase rate of fire to 9 from 6 rds/min.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Sweden modernises its CB90 fast attack craft fleet

by Nicholas Fiorenza

Saab leased one of Sweden's CB90 NG fast attack craft to show it at DSEI 2021. (Saab)

Sweden is modernising its fast attack craft fleet with the Combat Boat 90 Next Generation, which Saab is showcasing for the first time abroad at Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) 2021, being held in London from 14 to 17 September.

The CB90 NG includes a new combat management system and sensors for surveillance, ballistic protection, and a stabilised Trackfire remote weapon station with 50 calibre and 7.62 mm machine guns and the possibility of arming it with missiles in the future. Saab said the CB90 NG has improved stealth, manoeuvrability, and speed. On 17 September, the company took Janes for a ride on the Thames with the boat, which reached speeds of up to 40 kt, and demonstrated its very short breaking distance.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/greek-and-turkish-warships-collide-in-the-aegean-sea/

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Medi...

Greek and Turkish warships collide in the Aegean Sea

by John Pagni & Kerry Herschelman

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Mediterranean on 12 August.

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August.  (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August. (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The incident occurred amid rising tensions between the two countries after Turkey dispatched a geological survey vessel, Oruç Reis, to chart an area claimed by both sides for possible hydrocarbon deposits accompanied by five Turkish warships.

When the expedition was first announced, the backlash from NATO, the EU, US, and the UK appeared to force a re-think in Ankara, only for the flotilla to re-start its mission on 10 August between Crete, Cyprus, and around the small isolated Greek island of Kastellorizo, which is 2 km off the Turkish coast but 125 km east of Rodos, the nearest Greek territory. During its excursions, Oruç Reis has been shadowed by several Greek frigates.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Hanwha Defence unveils K9 SPH developmental roadmap

by Mark Cazalet

A mockup of the K9A2 SPH shown at DSEI 2021. (Hanwha Defence)

Hanwha Defence has outlined its K9 Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH) development roadmap, laying out plans for three new variants beyond the baseline K9 and K9A1 minor upgrade variants that are currently in service.

A Hanwha Defence representative told Janes at the 2021 DSEI exhibition, which was held in London from 14 to 17 September, the K9A2 was the first variant that the company was developing and this would be fitted within a fundamentally new turret, a fully automatic ammo loading system, and an improved fire control system to enable automatic gunlaying onto targets assigned by a command-and-control system.

The new variant will also have a higher sustained rate of fire. Yoon Young-ki, principal engineer in the K9A2 development project, said, “The development of a full-automatic ammunition handling and loading system has been very successful to increase rate of fire to 9 from 6 rds/min.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Sweden modernises its CB90 fast attack craft fleet

by Nicholas Fiorenza

Saab leased one of Sweden's CB90 NG fast attack craft to show it at DSEI 2021. (Saab)

Sweden is modernising its fast attack craft fleet with the Combat Boat 90 Next Generation, which Saab is showcasing for the first time abroad at Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) 2021, being held in London from 14 to 17 September.

The CB90 NG includes a new combat management system and sensors for surveillance, ballistic protection, and a stabilised Trackfire remote weapon station with 50 calibre and 7.62 mm machine guns and the possibility of arming it with missiles in the future. Saab said the CB90 NG has improved stealth, manoeuvrability, and speed. On 17 September, the company took Janes for a ride on the Thames with the boat, which reached speeds of up to 40 kt, and demonstrated its very short breaking distance.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/greek-and-turkish-warships-collide-in-the-aegean-sea/

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Medi...

Greek and Turkish warships collide in the Aegean Sea

by John Pagni & Kerry Herschelman

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Mediterranean on 12 August.

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August.  (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The Turkish survey vessel Oruç Reis is pictured being escorted by Turkish Navy vessels in the eastern Mediterranean on 10 August. (Ministry of National Defense/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The incident occurred amid rising tensions between the two countries after Turkey dispatched a geological survey vessel, Oruç Reis, to chart an area claimed by both sides for possible hydrocarbon deposits accompanied by five Turkish warships.

When the expedition was first announced, the backlash from NATO, the EU, US, and the UK appeared to force a re-think in Ankara, only for the flotilla to re-start its mission on 10 August between Crete, Cyprus, and around the small isolated Greek island of Kastellorizo, which is 2 km off the Turkish coast but 125 km east of Rodos, the nearest Greek territory. During its excursions, Oruç Reis has been shadowed by several Greek frigates.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


USN shipbuilding plan could cut total number of missile VLS cells, CBO says

by Michael Fabey

The 30-year US Navy (USN) shipbuilding plan released in June could reduce the number of missile vertical launch system (VLS) cells, according to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report, which was released on 16 September.

“The force structure goals expressed in the navy's [fiscal year (FY)] 2022 plan have a significant implication for how the distribution of VLS cells on the navy's surface could evolve,” the report noted.

“As a result of those changes (and CBO's assumptions about how those changes would be implemented), more surface combatants and unmanned systems would carry VLS cells, but the total number of VLS cells would be smaller,” it added.

The CBO said that the fleet's total VLS cell capacity represents one of the most important measures of the navy's offensive and defensive firepower.

“In the navy's objective force, the overall firepower (measured by the number of VLS cells) of the surface combatants would be less than it is today, but that force would pose a much harder targeting problem for an opposing fleet because the VLS cells would be deployed on many more ships,” the CBO reported.


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DSEI 2021: Hanwha Defence unveils K9 SPH developmental roadmap

by Mark Cazalet

A mockup of the K9A2 SPH shown at DSEI 2021. (Hanwha Defence)

Hanwha Defence has outlined its K9 Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH) development roadmap, laying out plans for three new variants beyond the baseline K9 and K9A1 minor upgrade variants that are currently in service.

A Hanwha Defence representative told Janes at the 2021 DSEI exhibition, which was held in London from 14 to 17 September, the K9A2 was the first variant that the company was developing and this would be fitted within a fundamentally new turret, a fully automatic ammo loading system, and an improved fire control system to enable automatic gunlaying onto targets assigned by a command-and-control system.

The new variant will also have a higher sustained rate of fire. Yoon Young-ki, principal engineer in the K9A2 development project, said, “The development of a full-automatic ammunition handling and loading system has been very successful to increase rate of fire to 9 from 6 rds/min.”


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DSEI 2021: Sweden modernises its CB90 fast attack craft fleet

by Nicholas Fiorenza

Saab leased one of Sweden's CB90 NG fast attack craft to show it at DSEI 2021. (Saab)

Sweden is modernising its fast attack craft fleet with the Combat Boat 90 Next Generation, which Saab is showcasing for the first time abroad at Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) 2021, being held in London from 14 to 17 September.

The CB90 NG includes a new combat management system and sensors for surveillance, ballistic protection, and a stabilised Trackfire remote weapon station with 50 calibre and 7.62 mm machine guns and the possibility of arming it with missiles in the future. Saab said the CB90 NG has improved stealth, manoeuvrability, and speed. On 17 September, the company took Janes for a ride on the Thames with the boat, which reached speeds of up to 40 kt, and demonstrated its very short breaking distance.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/greek-and-turkish-warships-collide-in-the-aegean-sea/

A Greek and Turkish warship were involved in a minor collision during a standoff in the eastern Medi...

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