Janes - News page

US Army begins receiving UH-72B helos

by Gareth Jennings

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, the manufacturer announced on 7 September.

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The National Guard took receipt of the first aircraft direct from Airbus Helicopters' Columbus production facility in Mississippi, marking the latest phase in the US Army Lakota programme that began with the contract award for the first of an eventual 463 UH-72A variants in 2006.

Derived from the civil EC145 (latterly known as the H145), the Lakota was originally procured by the US Army to free up front-line types such as the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, and to enable the phasing out of older types such as the Bell UH-1 ‘Huey' and OH-58A Kiowa Warrior.

First revealed in late August 2020 at the National Guard Association of the United States (NGAUS) virtual trade show, the UH-72B variant features a number of enhancements over the older UH-72A, namely the addition of a more efficient Fenestron tail rotor, more powerful engines, enhanced controls, and the Airbus Helionix avionics suite.

The Lakota can be configured for a number of support roles, including training, border security, search-and-rescue, medical evacuation, disaster response, VIP transport, and range support.

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/us-army-begins-receiving-uh-72b-helos/

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, t...

US Army begins receiving UH-72B helos

by Gareth Jennings

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, the manufacturer announced on 7 September.

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The National Guard took receipt of the first aircraft direct from Airbus Helicopters' Columbus production facility in Mississippi, marking the latest phase in the US Army Lakota programme that began with the contract award for the first of an eventual 463 UH-72A variants in 2006.

Derived from the civil EC145 (latterly known as the H145), the Lakota was originally procured by the US Army to free up front-line types such as the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, and to enable the phasing out of older types such as the Bell UH-1 ‘Huey' and OH-58A Kiowa Warrior.

First revealed in late August 2020 at the National Guard Association of the United States (NGAUS) virtual trade show, the UH-72B variant features a number of enhancements over the older UH-72A, namely the addition of a more efficient Fenestron tail rotor, more powerful engines, enhanced controls, and the Airbus Helionix avionics suite.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/us-army-begins-receiving-uh-72b-helos/

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, t...

US Army begins receiving UH-72B helos

by Gareth Jennings

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, the manufacturer announced on 7 September.

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The National Guard took receipt of the first aircraft direct from Airbus Helicopters' Columbus production facility in Mississippi, marking the latest phase in the US Army Lakota programme that began with the contract award for the first of an eventual 463 UH-72A variants in 2006.

Derived from the civil EC145 (latterly known as the H145), the Lakota was originally procured by the US Army to free up front-line types such as the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, and to enable the phasing out of older types such as the Bell UH-1 ‘Huey' and OH-58A Kiowa Warrior.

First revealed in late August 2020 at the National Guard Association of the United States (NGAUS) virtual trade show, the UH-72B variant features a number of enhancements over the older UH-72A, namely the addition of a more efficient Fenestron tail rotor, more powerful engines, enhanced controls, and the Airbus Helionix avionics suite.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/us-army-begins-receiving-uh-72b-helos/

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, t...

US Army begins receiving UH-72B helos

by Gareth Jennings

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, the manufacturer announced on 7 September.

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The National Guard took receipt of the first aircraft direct from Airbus Helicopters' Columbus production facility in Mississippi, marking the latest phase in the US Army Lakota programme that began with the contract award for the first of an eventual 463 UH-72A variants in 2006.

Derived from the civil EC145 (latterly known as the H145), the Lakota was originally procured by the US Army to free up front-line types such as the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, and to enable the phasing out of older types such as the Bell UH-1 ‘Huey' and OH-58A Kiowa Warrior.

First revealed in late August 2020 at the National Guard Association of the United States (NGAUS) virtual trade show, the UH-72B variant features a number of enhancements over the older UH-72A, namely the addition of a more efficient Fenestron tail rotor, more powerful engines, enhanced controls, and the Airbus Helionix avionics suite.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/us-army-begins-receiving-uh-72b-helos/

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, t...

US Army begins receiving UH-72B helos

by Gareth Jennings

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, the manufacturer announced on 7 September.

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The National Guard took receipt of the first aircraft direct from Airbus Helicopters' Columbus production facility in Mississippi, marking the latest phase in the US Army Lakota programme that began with the contract award for the first of an eventual 463 UH-72A variants in 2006.

Derived from the civil EC145 (latterly known as the H145), the Lakota was originally procured by the US Army to free up front-line types such as the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, and to enable the phasing out of older types such as the Bell UH-1 ‘Huey' and OH-58A Kiowa Warrior.

First revealed in late August 2020 at the National Guard Association of the United States (NGAUS) virtual trade show, the UH-72B variant features a number of enhancements over the older UH-72A, namely the addition of a more efficient Fenestron tail rotor, more powerful engines, enhanced controls, and the Airbus Helionix avionics suite.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/us-army-begins-receiving-uh-72b-helos/

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, t...

US Army begins receiving UH-72B helos

by Gareth Jennings

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, the manufacturer announced on 7 September.

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The National Guard took receipt of the first aircraft direct from Airbus Helicopters' Columbus production facility in Mississippi, marking the latest phase in the US Army Lakota programme that began with the contract award for the first of an eventual 463 UH-72A variants in 2006.

Derived from the civil EC145 (latterly known as the H145), the Lakota was originally procured by the US Army to free up front-line types such as the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, and to enable the phasing out of older types such as the Bell UH-1 ‘Huey' and OH-58A Kiowa Warrior.

First revealed in late August 2020 at the National Guard Association of the United States (NGAUS) virtual trade show, the UH-72B variant features a number of enhancements over the older UH-72A, namely the addition of a more efficient Fenestron tail rotor, more powerful engines, enhanced controls, and the Airbus Helionix avionics suite.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/us-army-begins-receiving-uh-72b-helos/

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, t...

US Army begins receiving UH-72B helos

by Gareth Jennings

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, the manufacturer announced on 7 September.

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The National Guard took receipt of the first aircraft direct from Airbus Helicopters' Columbus production facility in Mississippi, marking the latest phase in the US Army Lakota programme that began with the contract award for the first of an eventual 463 UH-72A variants in 2006.

Derived from the civil EC145 (latterly known as the H145), the Lakota was originally procured by the US Army to free up front-line types such as the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, and to enable the phasing out of older types such as the Bell UH-1 ‘Huey' and OH-58A Kiowa Warrior.

First revealed in late August 2020 at the National Guard Association of the United States (NGAUS) virtual trade show, the UH-72B variant features a number of enhancements over the older UH-72A, namely the addition of a more efficient Fenestron tail rotor, more powerful engines, enhanced controls, and the Airbus Helionix avionics suite.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/us-army-begins-receiving-uh-72b-helos/

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, t...

US Army begins receiving UH-72B helos

by Gareth Jennings

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, the manufacturer announced on 7 September.

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The first of 18 UH-72B helicopters was delivered to the National Guard on 7 September. (Airbus)

The National Guard took receipt of the first aircraft direct from Airbus Helicopters' Columbus production facility in Mississippi, marking the latest phase in the US Army Lakota programme that began with the contract award for the first of an eventual 463 UH-72A variants in 2006.

Derived from the civil EC145 (latterly known as the H145), the Lakota was originally procured by the US Army to free up front-line types such as the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, and to enable the phasing out of older types such as the Bell UH-1 ‘Huey' and OH-58A Kiowa Warrior.

First revealed in late August 2020 at the National Guard Association of the United States (NGAUS) virtual trade show, the UH-72B variant features a number of enhancements over the older UH-72A, namely the addition of a more efficient Fenestron tail rotor, more powerful engines, enhanced controls, and the Airbus Helionix avionics suite.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/us-army-begins-receiving-uh-72b-helos/

The US Army has received the first of 18 new Airbus Helicopters UH-72B Lakota support helicopters, t...

Request Consultation

Request a free consultation to discover how Janes can provide you with assured, interconnected open-source intelligence.

News Janes | The latest defence and security news from Janes - the trusted source for defence intelligence