Janes - News page

Update: SubSea Craft's Victa diver delivery craft enters the water

by Peter Felstead

SubSea Craft's Victa-class DDU prototype being lowered into the water for the first time on 9 September 2021 outside the company's waterfront facility in Portsmouth, UK. (Blue Harbour Creative Media/SubSea Craft)

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the water for the first time on 9 September.

Initial testing of the vessel is being conducted adjacent to the company's headquarters in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and focused on checking the vessel's equilibrium: a key first stage given that, unlike other diver insertion boats, the Victa concept combines a fast surface craft and a submersible within the same platform. The vessel can therefore approach its target at speed from offshore before submerging – an automated process in which the cabin is flooded – to effect the stealthy insertion of up to six divers seated behind a crew of two.

As the trials campaign moves forward the vessel will be tested in the waters around Gosport, Hampshire, and will then be moved to SubSea Craft's Trials, Testing, and Training (T3) facility at Portland in Dorset.

A SubSea Craft spokesman told Janes that dry trials for system integration are scheduled from 1 October until 14 January, static surface water trials from 21 January to 4 February, and dynamic surface trials from 10 February to 16 February. The first static subsea trials are scheduled from 18 February until 4 March and then dynamic subsea trials from 11 March until 25 March.

The Victa prototype, which uses a monohull designed by UK naval architects BAR Technologies, is known as ‘002', as it follows an initial catamaran testbed, ‘001', that was used to prove out the automated balance and trim technology employed by SubSea Craft. Work on the current vessel began in 2018.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/update-subsea-crafts-victa-diver-delivery-craft-enters-the-water/

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the w...

Update: SubSea Craft's Victa diver delivery craft enters the water

by Peter Felstead

SubSea Craft's Victa-class DDU prototype being lowered into the water for the first time on 9 September 2021 outside the company's waterfront facility in Portsmouth, UK. (Blue Harbour Creative Media/SubSea Craft)

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the water for the first time on 9 September.

Initial testing of the vessel is being conducted adjacent to the company's headquarters in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and focused on checking the vessel's equilibrium: a key first stage given that, unlike other diver insertion boats, the Victa concept combines a fast surface craft and a submersible within the same platform. The vessel can therefore approach its target at speed from offshore before submerging – an automated process in which the cabin is flooded – to effect the stealthy insertion of up to six divers seated behind a crew of two.

As the trials campaign moves forward the vessel will be tested in the waters around Gosport, Hampshire, and will then be moved to SubSea Craft's Trials, Testing, and Training (T3) facility at Portland in Dorset.

A SubSea Craft spokesman told Janes


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/update-subsea-crafts-victa-diver-delivery-craft-enters-the-water/

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the w...

Update: SubSea Craft's Victa diver delivery craft enters the water

by Peter Felstead

SubSea Craft's Victa-class DDU prototype being lowered into the water for the first time on 9 September 2021 outside the company's waterfront facility in Portsmouth, UK. (Blue Harbour Creative Media/SubSea Craft)

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the water for the first time on 9 September.

Initial testing of the vessel is being conducted adjacent to the company's headquarters in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and focused on checking the vessel's equilibrium: a key first stage given that, unlike other diver insertion boats, the Victa concept combines a fast surface craft and a submersible within the same platform. The vessel can therefore approach its target at speed from offshore before submerging – an automated process in which the cabin is flooded – to effect the stealthy insertion of up to six divers seated behind a crew of two.

As the trials campaign moves forward the vessel will be tested in the waters around Gosport, Hampshire, and will then be moved to SubSea Craft's Trials, Testing, and Training (T3) facility at Portland in Dorset.

A SubSea Craft spokesman told Janes


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/update-subsea-crafts-victa-diver-delivery-craft-enters-the-water/

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the w...

Update: SubSea Craft's Victa diver delivery craft enters the water

by Peter Felstead

SubSea Craft's Victa-class DDU prototype being lowered into the water for the first time on 9 September 2021 outside the company's waterfront facility in Portsmouth, UK. (Blue Harbour Creative Media/SubSea Craft)

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the water for the first time on 9 September.

Initial testing of the vessel is being conducted adjacent to the company's headquarters in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and focused on checking the vessel's equilibrium: a key first stage given that, unlike other diver insertion boats, the Victa concept combines a fast surface craft and a submersible within the same platform. The vessel can therefore approach its target at speed from offshore before submerging – an automated process in which the cabin is flooded – to effect the stealthy insertion of up to six divers seated behind a crew of two.

As the trials campaign moves forward the vessel will be tested in the waters around Gosport, Hampshire, and will then be moved to SubSea Craft's Trials, Testing, and Training (T3) facility at Portland in Dorset.

A SubSea Craft spokesman told Janes


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/update-subsea-crafts-victa-diver-delivery-craft-enters-the-water/

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the w...

Update: SubSea Craft's Victa diver delivery craft enters the water

by Peter Felstead

SubSea Craft's Victa-class DDU prototype being lowered into the water for the first time on 9 September 2021 outside the company's waterfront facility in Portsmouth, UK. (Blue Harbour Creative Media/SubSea Craft)

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the water for the first time on 9 September.

Initial testing of the vessel is being conducted adjacent to the company's headquarters in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and focused on checking the vessel's equilibrium: a key first stage given that, unlike other diver insertion boats, the Victa concept combines a fast surface craft and a submersible within the same platform. The vessel can therefore approach its target at speed from offshore before submerging – an automated process in which the cabin is flooded – to effect the stealthy insertion of up to six divers seated behind a crew of two.

As the trials campaign moves forward the vessel will be tested in the waters around Gosport, Hampshire, and will then be moved to SubSea Craft's Trials, Testing, and Training (T3) facility at Portland in Dorset.

A SubSea Craft spokesman told Janes


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/update-subsea-crafts-victa-diver-delivery-craft-enters-the-water/

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the w...

Update: SubSea Craft's Victa diver delivery craft enters the water

by Peter Felstead

SubSea Craft's Victa-class DDU prototype being lowered into the water for the first time on 9 September 2021 outside the company's waterfront facility in Portsmouth, UK. (Blue Harbour Creative Media/SubSea Craft)

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the water for the first time on 9 September.

Initial testing of the vessel is being conducted adjacent to the company's headquarters in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and focused on checking the vessel's equilibrium: a key first stage given that, unlike other diver insertion boats, the Victa concept combines a fast surface craft and a submersible within the same platform. The vessel can therefore approach its target at speed from offshore before submerging – an automated process in which the cabin is flooded – to effect the stealthy insertion of up to six divers seated behind a crew of two.

As the trials campaign moves forward the vessel will be tested in the waters around Gosport, Hampshire, and will then be moved to SubSea Craft's Trials, Testing, and Training (T3) facility at Portland in Dorset.

A SubSea Craft spokesman told Janes


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/update-subsea-crafts-victa-diver-delivery-craft-enters-the-water/

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the w...

Update: SubSea Craft's Victa diver delivery craft enters the water

by Peter Felstead

SubSea Craft's Victa-class DDU prototype being lowered into the water for the first time on 9 September 2021 outside the company's waterfront facility in Portsmouth, UK. (Blue Harbour Creative Media/SubSea Craft)

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the water for the first time on 9 September.

Initial testing of the vessel is being conducted adjacent to the company's headquarters in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and focused on checking the vessel's equilibrium: a key first stage given that, unlike other diver insertion boats, the Victa concept combines a fast surface craft and a submersible within the same platform. The vessel can therefore approach its target at speed from offshore before submerging – an automated process in which the cabin is flooded – to effect the stealthy insertion of up to six divers seated behind a crew of two.

As the trials campaign moves forward the vessel will be tested in the waters around Gosport, Hampshire, and will then be moved to SubSea Craft's Trials, Testing, and Training (T3) facility at Portland in Dorset.

A SubSea Craft spokesman told Janes


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/update-subsea-crafts-victa-diver-delivery-craft-enters-the-water/

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the w...

Update: SubSea Craft's Victa diver delivery craft enters the water

by Peter Felstead

SubSea Craft's Victa-class DDU prototype being lowered into the water for the first time on 9 September 2021 outside the company's waterfront facility in Portsmouth, UK. (Blue Harbour Creative Media/SubSea Craft)

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the water for the first time on 9 September.

Initial testing of the vessel is being conducted adjacent to the company's headquarters in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and focused on checking the vessel's equilibrium: a key first stage given that, unlike other diver insertion boats, the Victa concept combines a fast surface craft and a submersible within the same platform. The vessel can therefore approach its target at speed from offshore before submerging – an automated process in which the cabin is flooded – to effect the stealthy insertion of up to six divers seated behind a crew of two.

As the trials campaign moves forward the vessel will be tested in the waters around Gosport, Hampshire, and will then be moved to SubSea Craft's Trials, Testing, and Training (T3) facility at Portland in Dorset.

A SubSea Craft spokesman told Janes


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/update-subsea-crafts-victa-diver-delivery-craft-enters-the-water/

The first prototype of SubSea Craft's innovative Victa-class diver delivery unit (DDU) entered the w...

Request Consultation

Request a free consultation to discover how Janes can provide you with assured, interconnected open-source intelligence.

News Janes | The latest defence and security news from Janes - the trusted source for defence intelligence