Pentagon awards Robotic Research small business contract for Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV

by Pat Host

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract to evolve the design and increase the capacity of the company's Pegasus Mini hybrid unmanned aerial system/unmanned ground vehicle (UAS/UGV).

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Planned upgrades include changes to the airframe, battery, and computing and sensing capabilities. DTRA plans to incorporate the Pegasus Mini, the smallest platform in the Pegasus vehicle family, with a larger capacity into the agency's Modular Autonomous Counter-Weapon of Mass Destruction, Increment B (MACS-B) programme.

The two-year award is a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II contract, according to a company statement. SBIR Phase II awards are generally worth USD750,000.

Jim Frelk, Robotic Research senior vice president, told Janes on 19 August that the company will deliver more than one Pegasus Mini to the DTRA as part of this contract. Robotic Research wants to increase the vehicle's performance by evaluating ways to reduce its weight, which would increase its flight time and improve its durability.

Reducing the Pegasus Mini's overall weight, Frelk said, would enable it to carry more payload or increase its duration of flight or drive time. Robotic Research is hardening the platform and providing a more product-ready vehicle, at around technology readiness level (TRL) 4, as part of the award. At TRL 4, basic technological components are integrated to establish that they will work together.

The Pegasus Mini weighs 1.8 kg, including battery, and has more than 30 minutes of flight time or more than 2 hours of ground mode. The platform can support up to 0.9 kg payload.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/pentagon-awards-robotic-research-small-business-contract-for-pegasus-mini-hybrid-uasugv/

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract...

Pentagon awards Robotic Research small business contract for Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV

by Pat Host

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract to evolve the design and increase the capacity of the company's Pegasus Mini hybrid unmanned aerial system/unmanned ground vehicle (UAS/UGV).

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Planned upgrades include changes to the airframe, battery, and computing and sensing capabilities. DTRA plans to incorporate the Pegasus Mini, the smallest platform in the Pegasus vehicle family, with a larger capacity into the agency's Modular Autonomous Counter-Weapon of Mass Destruction, Increment B (MACS-B) programme.

The two-year award is a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II contract, according to a company statement. SBIR Phase II awards are generally worth USD750,000.

Jim Frelk, Robotic Research senior vice president, told Janes on 19 August that the company will deliver more than one Pegasus Mini to the DTRA as part of this contract. Robotic Research wants to increase the vehicle's performance by evaluating ways to reduce its weight, which would increase its flight time and improve its durability.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Fraudulent Covid-19 benefit claims surge since beginning of pandemic

by Eric Randolph

A man walks past a shuttered restaurant available for rent in central Barcelona on 12 August 2020. In Spain and elsewhere, the Covid-19 pandemic has pushed many small businesses to the brink of collapse, with 40,000 bars, restaurants, and hotels permanently closed in Spain by that date. (Josep Lago/AFP via Getty Images)

The unprecedented economic stimulus deployed in Western countries to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021 was met by an unprecedented surge in fraud by opportunistic individuals, unscrupulous businesses, and organised criminal networks. The need for governments to deploy funds quickly and with limited preparation time meant that minimal controls were put in place, creating large-scale opportunities for those who were already practised in identity theft, including international gangs.

There is evidence that the vast sums may have also attracted crime gangs that were not previously operating in this space and encouraged criminals to look beyond the immediate returns of pandemic-relief funds to target other forms of government benefits in a way that will pose future challenges for authorities.

Uncertain data


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South Korea to develop micro-satellite reconnaissance system from 2022

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

South Korea announced on 10 September plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats on the Korean Peninsula. (DAPA)

South Korea has announced plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats such as North Korea's mobile missile launchers.

The country's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said in a 10 September statement that the new reconnaissance system will comprise multiple clusters of ultra-small satellites, each operating in low-Earth orbit, and will be able to quickly identify anomalies within a designated area of detection.

The system will feature early warning capabilities, said DAPA, with the Yonhap News Agency reporting that the first set of micro-satellites is slated for launch in 2025.

The news agency also reported that KRW11.2 billion (USD9.6 million) has so far been requested to the National Assembly to fund this project.

DAPA pointed out that the micro-satellite system will be used to complement a number of larger military reconnaissance satellites being developed under the supervision of South Korea's Agency for Defense Development (ADD).


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General Electric begins testing on second XA100 adaptive cycle engine

by Pat Host

GE's XA100 for the USAF's AETP from first engine testing in December 2020. AETP will demonstrate adaptive engine technology can be scaled to meet military fighter engine size requirements while ensuring appropriate manufacturing and technology readiness levels by producing flight-weight prototypes. (General Electric)

General Electric (GE) began testing its second XA100 engine on 26 August as part of the US Air Force's (USAF's) Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP), according to a company statement.

This is GE's final planned prototype engine as part of AETP. Full-scale prototype testing in the programme is the culmination of a multiyear technology and risk reduction effort to bring an adaptive cycle engine to full maturity in partnership with the USAF.

David Tweedie, GE Edison Works general manager of advanced combat engines, told Janes on 7 September that GE's two XA100 prototype engines are essentially identical product-relevant test assets. The key differences are the types and locations of instrumentation in different parts of the engine, which will allow the company to fully characterise the system- and component-level behavior.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/pentagon-awards-robotic-research-small-business-contract-for-pegasus-mini-hybrid-uasugv/

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract...

Pentagon awards Robotic Research small business contract for Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV

by Pat Host

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract to evolve the design and increase the capacity of the company's Pegasus Mini hybrid unmanned aerial system/unmanned ground vehicle (UAS/UGV).

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Planned upgrades include changes to the airframe, battery, and computing and sensing capabilities. DTRA plans to incorporate the Pegasus Mini, the smallest platform in the Pegasus vehicle family, with a larger capacity into the agency's Modular Autonomous Counter-Weapon of Mass Destruction, Increment B (MACS-B) programme.

The two-year award is a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II contract, according to a company statement. SBIR Phase II awards are generally worth USD750,000.

Jim Frelk, Robotic Research senior vice president, told Janes on 19 August that the company will deliver more than one Pegasus Mini to the DTRA as part of this contract. Robotic Research wants to increase the vehicle's performance by evaluating ways to reduce its weight, which would increase its flight time and improve its durability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Fraudulent Covid-19 benefit claims surge since beginning of pandemic

by Eric Randolph

A man walks past a shuttered restaurant available for rent in central Barcelona on 12 August 2020. In Spain and elsewhere, the Covid-19 pandemic has pushed many small businesses to the brink of collapse, with 40,000 bars, restaurants, and hotels permanently closed in Spain by that date. (Josep Lago/AFP via Getty Images)

The unprecedented economic stimulus deployed in Western countries to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021 was met by an unprecedented surge in fraud by opportunistic individuals, unscrupulous businesses, and organised criminal networks. The need for governments to deploy funds quickly and with limited preparation time meant that minimal controls were put in place, creating large-scale opportunities for those who were already practised in identity theft, including international gangs.

There is evidence that the vast sums may have also attracted crime gangs that were not previously operating in this space and encouraged criminals to look beyond the immediate returns of pandemic-relief funds to target other forms of government benefits in a way that will pose future challenges for authorities.

Uncertain data


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea to develop micro-satellite reconnaissance system from 2022

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

South Korea announced on 10 September plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats on the Korean Peninsula. (DAPA)

South Korea has announced plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats such as North Korea's mobile missile launchers.

The country's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said in a 10 September statement that the new reconnaissance system will comprise multiple clusters of ultra-small satellites, each operating in low-Earth orbit, and will be able to quickly identify anomalies within a designated area of detection.

The system will feature early warning capabilities, said DAPA, with the Yonhap News Agency reporting that the first set of micro-satellites is slated for launch in 2025.

The news agency also reported that KRW11.2 billion (USD9.6 million) has so far been requested to the National Assembly to fund this project.

DAPA pointed out that the micro-satellite system will be used to complement a number of larger military reconnaissance satellites being developed under the supervision of South Korea's Agency for Defense Development (ADD).


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


General Electric begins testing on second XA100 adaptive cycle engine

by Pat Host

GE's XA100 for the USAF's AETP from first engine testing in December 2020. AETP will demonstrate adaptive engine technology can be scaled to meet military fighter engine size requirements while ensuring appropriate manufacturing and technology readiness levels by producing flight-weight prototypes. (General Electric)

General Electric (GE) began testing its second XA100 engine on 26 August as part of the US Air Force's (USAF's) Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP), according to a company statement.

This is GE's final planned prototype engine as part of AETP. Full-scale prototype testing in the programme is the culmination of a multiyear technology and risk reduction effort to bring an adaptive cycle engine to full maturity in partnership with the USAF.

David Tweedie, GE Edison Works general manager of advanced combat engines, told Janes on 7 September that GE's two XA100 prototype engines are essentially identical product-relevant test assets. The key differences are the types and locations of instrumentation in different parts of the engine, which will allow the company to fully characterise the system- and component-level behavior.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/pentagon-awards-robotic-research-small-business-contract-for-pegasus-mini-hybrid-uasugv/

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract...

Pentagon awards Robotic Research small business contract for Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV

by Pat Host

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract to evolve the design and increase the capacity of the company's Pegasus Mini hybrid unmanned aerial system/unmanned ground vehicle (UAS/UGV).

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Planned upgrades include changes to the airframe, battery, and computing and sensing capabilities. DTRA plans to incorporate the Pegasus Mini, the smallest platform in the Pegasus vehicle family, with a larger capacity into the agency's Modular Autonomous Counter-Weapon of Mass Destruction, Increment B (MACS-B) programme.

The two-year award is a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II contract, according to a company statement. SBIR Phase II awards are generally worth USD750,000.

Jim Frelk, Robotic Research senior vice president, told Janes on 19 August that the company will deliver more than one Pegasus Mini to the DTRA as part of this contract. Robotic Research wants to increase the vehicle's performance by evaluating ways to reduce its weight, which would increase its flight time and improve its durability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Fraudulent Covid-19 benefit claims surge since beginning of pandemic

by Eric Randolph

A man walks past a shuttered restaurant available for rent in central Barcelona on 12 August 2020. In Spain and elsewhere, the Covid-19 pandemic has pushed many small businesses to the brink of collapse, with 40,000 bars, restaurants, and hotels permanently closed in Spain by that date. (Josep Lago/AFP via Getty Images)

The unprecedented economic stimulus deployed in Western countries to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021 was met by an unprecedented surge in fraud by opportunistic individuals, unscrupulous businesses, and organised criminal networks. The need for governments to deploy funds quickly and with limited preparation time meant that minimal controls were put in place, creating large-scale opportunities for those who were already practised in identity theft, including international gangs.

There is evidence that the vast sums may have also attracted crime gangs that were not previously operating in this space and encouraged criminals to look beyond the immediate returns of pandemic-relief funds to target other forms of government benefits in a way that will pose future challenges for authorities.

Uncertain data


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea to develop micro-satellite reconnaissance system from 2022

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

South Korea announced on 10 September plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats on the Korean Peninsula. (DAPA)

South Korea has announced plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats such as North Korea's mobile missile launchers.

The country's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said in a 10 September statement that the new reconnaissance system will comprise multiple clusters of ultra-small satellites, each operating in low-Earth orbit, and will be able to quickly identify anomalies within a designated area of detection.

The system will feature early warning capabilities, said DAPA, with the Yonhap News Agency reporting that the first set of micro-satellites is slated for launch in 2025.

The news agency also reported that KRW11.2 billion (USD9.6 million) has so far been requested to the National Assembly to fund this project.

DAPA pointed out that the micro-satellite system will be used to complement a number of larger military reconnaissance satellites being developed under the supervision of South Korea's Agency for Defense Development (ADD).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


General Electric begins testing on second XA100 adaptive cycle engine

by Pat Host

GE's XA100 for the USAF's AETP from first engine testing in December 2020. AETP will demonstrate adaptive engine technology can be scaled to meet military fighter engine size requirements while ensuring appropriate manufacturing and technology readiness levels by producing flight-weight prototypes. (General Electric)

General Electric (GE) began testing its second XA100 engine on 26 August as part of the US Air Force's (USAF's) Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP), according to a company statement.

This is GE's final planned prototype engine as part of AETP. Full-scale prototype testing in the programme is the culmination of a multiyear technology and risk reduction effort to bring an adaptive cycle engine to full maturity in partnership with the USAF.

David Tweedie, GE Edison Works general manager of advanced combat engines, told Janes on 7 September that GE's two XA100 prototype engines are essentially identical product-relevant test assets. The key differences are the types and locations of instrumentation in different parts of the engine, which will allow the company to fully characterise the system- and component-level behavior.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/pentagon-awards-robotic-research-small-business-contract-for-pegasus-mini-hybrid-uasugv/

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract...

Pentagon awards Robotic Research small business contract for Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV

by Pat Host

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract to evolve the design and increase the capacity of the company's Pegasus Mini hybrid unmanned aerial system/unmanned ground vehicle (UAS/UGV).

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Planned upgrades include changes to the airframe, battery, and computing and sensing capabilities. DTRA plans to incorporate the Pegasus Mini, the smallest platform in the Pegasus vehicle family, with a larger capacity into the agency's Modular Autonomous Counter-Weapon of Mass Destruction, Increment B (MACS-B) programme.

The two-year award is a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II contract, according to a company statement. SBIR Phase II awards are generally worth USD750,000.

Jim Frelk, Robotic Research senior vice president, told Janes on 19 August that the company will deliver more than one Pegasus Mini to the DTRA as part of this contract. Robotic Research wants to increase the vehicle's performance by evaluating ways to reduce its weight, which would increase its flight time and improve its durability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Fraudulent Covid-19 benefit claims surge since beginning of pandemic

by Eric Randolph

A man walks past a shuttered restaurant available for rent in central Barcelona on 12 August 2020. In Spain and elsewhere, the Covid-19 pandemic has pushed many small businesses to the brink of collapse, with 40,000 bars, restaurants, and hotels permanently closed in Spain by that date. (Josep Lago/AFP via Getty Images)

The unprecedented economic stimulus deployed in Western countries to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021 was met by an unprecedented surge in fraud by opportunistic individuals, unscrupulous businesses, and organised criminal networks. The need for governments to deploy funds quickly and with limited preparation time meant that minimal controls were put in place, creating large-scale opportunities for those who were already practised in identity theft, including international gangs.

There is evidence that the vast sums may have also attracted crime gangs that were not previously operating in this space and encouraged criminals to look beyond the immediate returns of pandemic-relief funds to target other forms of government benefits in a way that will pose future challenges for authorities.

Uncertain data


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea to develop micro-satellite reconnaissance system from 2022

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

South Korea announced on 10 September plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats on the Korean Peninsula. (DAPA)

South Korea has announced plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats such as North Korea's mobile missile launchers.

The country's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said in a 10 September statement that the new reconnaissance system will comprise multiple clusters of ultra-small satellites, each operating in low-Earth orbit, and will be able to quickly identify anomalies within a designated area of detection.

The system will feature early warning capabilities, said DAPA, with the Yonhap News Agency reporting that the first set of micro-satellites is slated for launch in 2025.

The news agency also reported that KRW11.2 billion (USD9.6 million) has so far been requested to the National Assembly to fund this project.

DAPA pointed out that the micro-satellite system will be used to complement a number of larger military reconnaissance satellites being developed under the supervision of South Korea's Agency for Defense Development (ADD).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


General Electric begins testing on second XA100 adaptive cycle engine

by Pat Host

GE's XA100 for the USAF's AETP from first engine testing in December 2020. AETP will demonstrate adaptive engine technology can be scaled to meet military fighter engine size requirements while ensuring appropriate manufacturing and technology readiness levels by producing flight-weight prototypes. (General Electric)

General Electric (GE) began testing its second XA100 engine on 26 August as part of the US Air Force's (USAF's) Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP), according to a company statement.

This is GE's final planned prototype engine as part of AETP. Full-scale prototype testing in the programme is the culmination of a multiyear technology and risk reduction effort to bring an adaptive cycle engine to full maturity in partnership with the USAF.

David Tweedie, GE Edison Works general manager of advanced combat engines, told Janes on 7 September that GE's two XA100 prototype engines are essentially identical product-relevant test assets. The key differences are the types and locations of instrumentation in different parts of the engine, which will allow the company to fully characterise the system- and component-level behavior.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/pentagon-awards-robotic-research-small-business-contract-for-pegasus-mini-hybrid-uasugv/

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract...

Pentagon awards Robotic Research small business contract for Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV

by Pat Host

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract to evolve the design and increase the capacity of the company's Pegasus Mini hybrid unmanned aerial system/unmanned ground vehicle (UAS/UGV).

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Planned upgrades include changes to the airframe, battery, and computing and sensing capabilities. DTRA plans to incorporate the Pegasus Mini, the smallest platform in the Pegasus vehicle family, with a larger capacity into the agency's Modular Autonomous Counter-Weapon of Mass Destruction, Increment B (MACS-B) programme.

The two-year award is a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II contract, according to a company statement. SBIR Phase II awards are generally worth USD750,000.

Jim Frelk, Robotic Research senior vice president, told Janes on 19 August that the company will deliver more than one Pegasus Mini to the DTRA as part of this contract. Robotic Research wants to increase the vehicle's performance by evaluating ways to reduce its weight, which would increase its flight time and improve its durability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Fraudulent Covid-19 benefit claims surge since beginning of pandemic

by Eric Randolph

A man walks past a shuttered restaurant available for rent in central Barcelona on 12 August 2020. In Spain and elsewhere, the Covid-19 pandemic has pushed many small businesses to the brink of collapse, with 40,000 bars, restaurants, and hotels permanently closed in Spain by that date. (Josep Lago/AFP via Getty Images)

The unprecedented economic stimulus deployed in Western countries to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021 was met by an unprecedented surge in fraud by opportunistic individuals, unscrupulous businesses, and organised criminal networks. The need for governments to deploy funds quickly and with limited preparation time meant that minimal controls were put in place, creating large-scale opportunities for those who were already practised in identity theft, including international gangs.

There is evidence that the vast sums may have also attracted crime gangs that were not previously operating in this space and encouraged criminals to look beyond the immediate returns of pandemic-relief funds to target other forms of government benefits in a way that will pose future challenges for authorities.

Uncertain data


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea to develop micro-satellite reconnaissance system from 2022

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

South Korea announced on 10 September plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats on the Korean Peninsula. (DAPA)

South Korea has announced plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats such as North Korea's mobile missile launchers.

The country's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said in a 10 September statement that the new reconnaissance system will comprise multiple clusters of ultra-small satellites, each operating in low-Earth orbit, and will be able to quickly identify anomalies within a designated area of detection.

The system will feature early warning capabilities, said DAPA, with the Yonhap News Agency reporting that the first set of micro-satellites is slated for launch in 2025.

The news agency also reported that KRW11.2 billion (USD9.6 million) has so far been requested to the National Assembly to fund this project.

DAPA pointed out that the micro-satellite system will be used to complement a number of larger military reconnaissance satellites being developed under the supervision of South Korea's Agency for Defense Development (ADD).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


General Electric begins testing on second XA100 adaptive cycle engine

by Pat Host

GE's XA100 for the USAF's AETP from first engine testing in December 2020. AETP will demonstrate adaptive engine technology can be scaled to meet military fighter engine size requirements while ensuring appropriate manufacturing and technology readiness levels by producing flight-weight prototypes. (General Electric)

General Electric (GE) began testing its second XA100 engine on 26 August as part of the US Air Force's (USAF's) Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP), according to a company statement.

This is GE's final planned prototype engine as part of AETP. Full-scale prototype testing in the programme is the culmination of a multiyear technology and risk reduction effort to bring an adaptive cycle engine to full maturity in partnership with the USAF.

David Tweedie, GE Edison Works general manager of advanced combat engines, told Janes on 7 September that GE's two XA100 prototype engines are essentially identical product-relevant test assets. The key differences are the types and locations of instrumentation in different parts of the engine, which will allow the company to fully characterise the system- and component-level behavior.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/pentagon-awards-robotic-research-small-business-contract-for-pegasus-mini-hybrid-uasugv/

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract...

Pentagon awards Robotic Research small business contract for Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV

by Pat Host

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract to evolve the design and increase the capacity of the company's Pegasus Mini hybrid unmanned aerial system/unmanned ground vehicle (UAS/UGV).

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Planned upgrades include changes to the airframe, battery, and computing and sensing capabilities. DTRA plans to incorporate the Pegasus Mini, the smallest platform in the Pegasus vehicle family, with a larger capacity into the agency's Modular Autonomous Counter-Weapon of Mass Destruction, Increment B (MACS-B) programme.

The two-year award is a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II contract, according to a company statement. SBIR Phase II awards are generally worth USD750,000.

Jim Frelk, Robotic Research senior vice president, told Janes on 19 August that the company will deliver more than one Pegasus Mini to the DTRA as part of this contract. Robotic Research wants to increase the vehicle's performance by evaluating ways to reduce its weight, which would increase its flight time and improve its durability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Fraudulent Covid-19 benefit claims surge since beginning of pandemic

by Eric Randolph

A man walks past a shuttered restaurant available for rent in central Barcelona on 12 August 2020. In Spain and elsewhere, the Covid-19 pandemic has pushed many small businesses to the brink of collapse, with 40,000 bars, restaurants, and hotels permanently closed in Spain by that date. (Josep Lago/AFP via Getty Images)

The unprecedented economic stimulus deployed in Western countries to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021 was met by an unprecedented surge in fraud by opportunistic individuals, unscrupulous businesses, and organised criminal networks. The need for governments to deploy funds quickly and with limited preparation time meant that minimal controls were put in place, creating large-scale opportunities for those who were already practised in identity theft, including international gangs.

There is evidence that the vast sums may have also attracted crime gangs that were not previously operating in this space and encouraged criminals to look beyond the immediate returns of pandemic-relief funds to target other forms of government benefits in a way that will pose future challenges for authorities.

Uncertain data


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea to develop micro-satellite reconnaissance system from 2022

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

South Korea announced on 10 September plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats on the Korean Peninsula. (DAPA)

South Korea has announced plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats such as North Korea's mobile missile launchers.

The country's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said in a 10 September statement that the new reconnaissance system will comprise multiple clusters of ultra-small satellites, each operating in low-Earth orbit, and will be able to quickly identify anomalies within a designated area of detection.

The system will feature early warning capabilities, said DAPA, with the Yonhap News Agency reporting that the first set of micro-satellites is slated for launch in 2025.

The news agency also reported that KRW11.2 billion (USD9.6 million) has so far been requested to the National Assembly to fund this project.

DAPA pointed out that the micro-satellite system will be used to complement a number of larger military reconnaissance satellites being developed under the supervision of South Korea's Agency for Defense Development (ADD).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


General Electric begins testing on second XA100 adaptive cycle engine

by Pat Host

GE's XA100 for the USAF's AETP from first engine testing in December 2020. AETP will demonstrate adaptive engine technology can be scaled to meet military fighter engine size requirements while ensuring appropriate manufacturing and technology readiness levels by producing flight-weight prototypes. (General Electric)

General Electric (GE) began testing its second XA100 engine on 26 August as part of the US Air Force's (USAF's) Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP), according to a company statement.

This is GE's final planned prototype engine as part of AETP. Full-scale prototype testing in the programme is the culmination of a multiyear technology and risk reduction effort to bring an adaptive cycle engine to full maturity in partnership with the USAF.

David Tweedie, GE Edison Works general manager of advanced combat engines, told Janes on 7 September that GE's two XA100 prototype engines are essentially identical product-relevant test assets. The key differences are the types and locations of instrumentation in different parts of the engine, which will allow the company to fully characterise the system- and component-level behavior.


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The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract...

Pentagon awards Robotic Research small business contract for Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV

by Pat Host

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract to evolve the design and increase the capacity of the company's Pegasus Mini hybrid unmanned aerial system/unmanned ground vehicle (UAS/UGV).

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Robotic Research's Pegasus Mini hybrid UAS/UGV. The company received an SBIR Phase II contract from the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency to evolve the aircraft's design and increase its capacity. (Robotic Research)

Planned upgrades include changes to the airframe, battery, and computing and sensing capabilities. DTRA plans to incorporate the Pegasus Mini, the smallest platform in the Pegasus vehicle family, with a larger capacity into the agency's Modular Autonomous Counter-Weapon of Mass Destruction, Increment B (MACS-B) programme.

The two-year award is a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II contract, according to a company statement. SBIR Phase II awards are generally worth USD750,000.

Jim Frelk, Robotic Research senior vice president, told Janes on 19 August that the company will deliver more than one Pegasus Mini to the DTRA as part of this contract. Robotic Research wants to increase the vehicle's performance by evaluating ways to reduce its weight, which would increase its flight time and improve its durability.


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Fraudulent Covid-19 benefit claims surge since beginning of pandemic

by Eric Randolph

A man walks past a shuttered restaurant available for rent in central Barcelona on 12 August 2020. In Spain and elsewhere, the Covid-19 pandemic has pushed many small businesses to the brink of collapse, with 40,000 bars, restaurants, and hotels permanently closed in Spain by that date. (Josep Lago/AFP via Getty Images)

The unprecedented economic stimulus deployed in Western countries to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021 was met by an unprecedented surge in fraud by opportunistic individuals, unscrupulous businesses, and organised criminal networks. The need for governments to deploy funds quickly and with limited preparation time meant that minimal controls were put in place, creating large-scale opportunities for those who were already practised in identity theft, including international gangs.

There is evidence that the vast sums may have also attracted crime gangs that were not previously operating in this space and encouraged criminals to look beyond the immediate returns of pandemic-relief funds to target other forms of government benefits in a way that will pose future challenges for authorities.

Uncertain data


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South Korea to develop micro-satellite reconnaissance system from 2022

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

South Korea announced on 10 September plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats on the Korean Peninsula. (DAPA)

South Korea has announced plans to develop a micro-satellite-based reconnaissance system from 2022 to enhance its capability to detect security threats such as North Korea's mobile missile launchers.

The country's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said in a 10 September statement that the new reconnaissance system will comprise multiple clusters of ultra-small satellites, each operating in low-Earth orbit, and will be able to quickly identify anomalies within a designated area of detection.

The system will feature early warning capabilities, said DAPA, with the Yonhap News Agency reporting that the first set of micro-satellites is slated for launch in 2025.

The news agency also reported that KRW11.2 billion (USD9.6 million) has so far been requested to the National Assembly to fund this project.

DAPA pointed out that the micro-satellite system will be used to complement a number of larger military reconnaissance satellites being developed under the supervision of South Korea's Agency for Defense Development (ADD).


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General Electric begins testing on second XA100 adaptive cycle engine

by Pat Host

GE's XA100 for the USAF's AETP from first engine testing in December 2020. AETP will demonstrate adaptive engine technology can be scaled to meet military fighter engine size requirements while ensuring appropriate manufacturing and technology readiness levels by producing flight-weight prototypes. (General Electric)

General Electric (GE) began testing its second XA100 engine on 26 August as part of the US Air Force's (USAF's) Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP), according to a company statement.

This is GE's final planned prototype engine as part of AETP. Full-scale prototype testing in the programme is the culmination of a multiyear technology and risk reduction effort to bring an adaptive cycle engine to full maturity in partnership with the USAF.

David Tweedie, GE Edison Works general manager of advanced combat engines, told Janes on 7 September that GE's two XA100 prototype engines are essentially identical product-relevant test assets. The key differences are the types and locations of instrumentation in different parts of the engine, which will allow the company to fully characterise the system- and component-level behavior.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/pentagon-awards-robotic-research-small-business-contract-for-pegasus-mini-hybrid-uasugv/

The US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) has awarded Robotic Research a small business contract...

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