Janes - News page

Insitu to pay USD25 million to settle UAV overcharge case

by Marc Selinger

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US military to supply and operate ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions, the US Justice Department announced on 12 January.

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

According to the department, Insitu “knowingly induced” the US Navy Department and US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to award seven no-bid contracts at “inflated prices” from 2009 to 2017. While Insitu told the two agencies it was going to use new parts to conduct its work, it actually used less expensive “recycled, refurbished, reconditioned, and/or reconfigured parts” instead, violating the federal False Claims Act, the department alleged.

“Taxpayers deserve to get what they paid for – especially in significant no-bid military contracts,” said Brian Moran, US attorney for the Western District of Washington state. “Cases such as this one should be seen as a warning to defence contractors that false claims have no place in military purchasing.”

Insitu denied the allegations but said the settlement “resolves a complex case”. The company insisted that the information it disclosed to the US Navy and SOCOM “satisfied all requirements”. It also said it provided “superior ISR services” to both entities “at all times”.

The allegations surfaced in a lawsuit that former Insitu executive D R O’Hara filed in federal court in Seattle, Washington, in 2015, the department said. While the federal government ultimately took over the case, whistleblower law entitles O’Hara to receive USD4.6 million of the recovered funds.

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/insitu-to-pay-usd25-million-to-settle-uav-overcharge-case/

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US ...

Know the threat

Impartial perspective on military capabilities, terrorism and insurgency and chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear threats.

Threat Intelligence

Know the location

Build a clear picture for military operations or market knowledge through smart geospatial layers.

Country Intelligence

Know the opportunity

Trusted, connected data and unique insight that enables growth in a complex and reshaping industry.

Defence Industry Intelligence

Know the detail

Connected, structured equipment data that delivers unique insights.

Equipment Intelligence

Insitu to pay USD25 million to settle UAV overcharge case

by Marc Selinger

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US military to supply and operate ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions, the US Justice Department announced on 12 January.

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

According to the department, Insitu “knowingly induced” the US Navy Department and US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to award seven no-bid contracts at “inflated prices” from 2009 to 2017. While Insitu told the two agencies it was going to use new parts to conduct its work, it actually used less expensive “recycled, refurbished, reconditioned, and/or reconfigured parts” instead, violating the federal False Claims Act, the department alleged.

“Taxpayers deserve to get what they paid for – especially in significant no-bid military contracts,” said Brian Moran, US attorney for the Western District of Washington state. “Cases such as this one should be seen as a warning to defence contractors that false claims have no place in military purchasing.”

Insitu denied the allegations but said the settlement “resolves a complex case”. The company insisted that the information it disclosed to the US Navy and SOCOM “satisfied all requirements”. It also said it provided “superior ISR services” to both entities “at all times”.

The allegations surfaced in a lawsuit that former Insitu executive D R O’Hara filed in federal court in Seattle, Washington, in 2015, the department said. While the federal government ultimately took over the case, whistleblower law entitles O’Hara to receive USD4.6 million of the recovered funds.

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/insitu-to-pay-usd25-million-to-settle-uav-overcharge-case/

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US ...

Insitu to pay USD25 million to settle UAV overcharge case

by Marc Selinger

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US military to supply and operate ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions, the US Justice Department announced on 12 January.

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

According to the department, Insitu “knowingly induced” the US Navy Department and US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to award seven no-bid contracts at “inflated prices” from 2009 to 2017. While Insitu told the two agencies it was going to use new parts to conduct its work, it actually used less expensive “recycled, refurbished, reconditioned, and/or reconfigured parts” instead, violating the federal False Claims Act, the department alleged.

“Taxpayers deserve to get what they paid for – especially in significant no-bid military contracts,” said Brian Moran, US attorney for the Western District of Washington state. “Cases such as this one should be seen as a warning to defence contractors that false claims have no place in military purchasing.”

Insitu denied the allegations but said the settlement “resolves a complex case”. The company insisted that the information it disclosed to the US Navy and SOCOM “satisfied all requirements”. It also said it provided “superior ISR services” to both entities “at all times”.

The allegations surfaced in a lawsuit that former Insitu executive D R O’Hara filed in federal court in Seattle, Washington, in 2015, the department said. While the federal government ultimately took over the case, whistleblower law entitles O’Hara to receive USD4.6 million of the recovered funds.

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/insitu-to-pay-usd25-million-to-settle-uav-overcharge-case/

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US ...

Insitu to pay USD25 million to settle UAV overcharge case

by Marc Selinger

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US military to supply and operate ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions, the US Justice Department announced on 12 January.

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

According to the department, Insitu “knowingly induced” the US Navy Department and US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to award seven no-bid contracts at “inflated prices” from 2009 to 2017. While Insitu told the two agencies it was going to use new parts to conduct its work, it actually used less expensive “recycled, refurbished, reconditioned, and/or reconfigured parts” instead, violating the federal False Claims Act, the department alleged.

“Taxpayers deserve to get what they paid for – especially in significant no-bid military contracts,” said Brian Moran, US attorney for the Western District of Washington state. “Cases such as this one should be seen as a warning to defence contractors that false claims have no place in military purchasing.”

Insitu denied the allegations but said the settlement “resolves a complex case”. The company insisted that the information it disclosed to the US Navy and SOCOM “satisfied all requirements”. It also said it provided “superior ISR services” to both entities “at all times”.

The allegations surfaced in a lawsuit that former Insitu executive D R O’Hara filed in federal court in Seattle, Washington, in 2015, the department said. While the federal government ultimately took over the case, whistleblower law entitles O’Hara to receive USD4.6 million of the recovered funds.

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/insitu-to-pay-usd25-million-to-settle-uav-overcharge-case/

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US ...

Insitu to pay USD25 million to settle UAV overcharge case

by Marc Selinger

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US military to supply and operate ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions, the US Justice Department announced on 12 January.

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

According to the department, Insitu “knowingly induced” the US Navy Department and US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to award seven no-bid contracts at “inflated prices” from 2009 to 2017. While Insitu told the two agencies it was going to use new parts to conduct its work, it actually used less expensive “recycled, refurbished, reconditioned, and/or reconfigured parts” instead, violating the federal False Claims Act, the department alleged.

“Taxpayers deserve to get what they paid for – especially in significant no-bid military contracts,” said Brian Moran, US attorney for the Western District of Washington state. “Cases such as this one should be seen as a warning to defence contractors that false claims have no place in military purchasing.”

Insitu denied the allegations but said the settlement “resolves a complex case”. The company insisted that the information it disclosed to the US Navy and SOCOM “satisfied all requirements”. It also said it provided “superior ISR services” to both entities “at all times”.

The allegations surfaced in a lawsuit that former Insitu executive D R O’Hara filed in federal court in Seattle, Washington, in 2015, the department said. While the federal government ultimately took over the case, whistleblower law entitles O’Hara to receive USD4.6 million of the recovered funds.

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/insitu-to-pay-usd25-million-to-settle-uav-overcharge-case/

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US ...

Insitu to pay USD25 million to settle UAV overcharge case

by Marc Selinger

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US military to supply and operate ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions, the US Justice Department announced on 12 January.

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

According to the department, Insitu “knowingly induced” the US Navy Department and US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to award seven no-bid contracts at “inflated prices” from 2009 to 2017. While Insitu told the two agencies it was going to use new parts to conduct its work, it actually used less expensive “recycled, refurbished, reconditioned, and/or reconfigured parts” instead, violating the federal False Claims Act, the department alleged.

“Taxpayers deserve to get what they paid for – especially in significant no-bid military contracts,” said Brian Moran, US attorney for the Western District of Washington state. “Cases such as this one should be seen as a warning to defence contractors that false claims have no place in military purchasing.”

Insitu denied the allegations but said the settlement “resolves a complex case”. The company insisted that the information it disclosed to the US Navy and SOCOM “satisfied all requirements”. It also said it provided “superior ISR services” to both entities “at all times”.

The allegations surfaced in a lawsuit that former Insitu executive D R O’Hara filed in federal court in Seattle, Washington, in 2015, the department said. While the federal government ultimately took over the case, whistleblower law entitles O’Hara to receive USD4.6 million of the recovered funds.

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/insitu-to-pay-usd25-million-to-settle-uav-overcharge-case/

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US ...

Insitu to pay USD25 million to settle UAV overcharge case

by Marc Selinger

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US military to supply and operate ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions, the US Justice Department announced on 12 January.

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

According to the department, Insitu “knowingly induced” the US Navy Department and US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to award seven no-bid contracts at “inflated prices” from 2009 to 2017. While Insitu told the two agencies it was going to use new parts to conduct its work, it actually used less expensive “recycled, refurbished, reconditioned, and/or reconfigured parts” instead, violating the federal False Claims Act, the department alleged.

“Taxpayers deserve to get what they paid for – especially in significant no-bid military contracts,” said Brian Moran, US attorney for the Western District of Washington state. “Cases such as this one should be seen as a warning to defence contractors that false claims have no place in military purchasing.”

Insitu denied the allegations but said the settlement “resolves a complex case”. The company insisted that the information it disclosed to the US Navy and SOCOM “satisfied all requirements”. It also said it provided “superior ISR services” to both entities “at all times”.

The allegations surfaced in a lawsuit that former Insitu executive D R O’Hara filed in federal court in Seattle, Washington, in 2015, the department said. While the federal government ultimately took over the case, whistleblower law entitles O’Hara to receive USD4.6 million of the recovered funds.

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/insitu-to-pay-usd25-million-to-settle-uav-overcharge-case/

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US ...

Insitu to pay USD25 million to settle UAV overcharge case

by Marc Selinger

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US military to supply and operate ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions, the US Justice Department announced on 12 January.

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

Insitu’s ScanEagle UAV. (Boeing)

According to the department, Insitu “knowingly induced” the US Navy Department and US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to award seven no-bid contracts at “inflated prices” from 2009 to 2017. While Insitu told the two agencies it was going to use new parts to conduct its work, it actually used less expensive “recycled, refurbished, reconditioned, and/or reconfigured parts” instead, violating the federal False Claims Act, the department alleged.

“Taxpayers deserve to get what they paid for – especially in significant no-bid military contracts,” said Brian Moran, US attorney for the Western District of Washington state. “Cases such as this one should be seen as a warning to defence contractors that false claims have no place in military purchasing.”

Insitu denied the allegations but said the settlement “resolves a complex case”. The company insisted that the information it disclosed to the US Navy and SOCOM “satisfied all requirements”. It also said it provided “superior ISR services” to both entities “at all times”.

The allegations surfaced in a lawsuit that former Insitu executive D R O’Hara filed in federal court in Seattle, Washington, in 2015, the department said. While the federal government ultimately took over the case, whistleblower law entitles O’Hara to receive USD4.6 million of the recovered funds.

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/insitu-to-pay-usd25-million-to-settle-uav-overcharge-case/

Boeing’s Insitu company has agreed to pay USD25 million to settle allegations it overcharged the US ...

Loading animation

Request a free consultation to find out how in a world of fake news and ever growing conflict, Janes can provide you with unbiased, verified open-source intelligence.

Defence News Janes | The latest defence and security news from Janes - the trusted source for defence intelligence