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Barracuda unveils 747MM USV

by Dimitrios Mitsopoulos

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcased its indigenously developed Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission (747MM) unmanned surface vehicle (USV) in public for the first time at the DEFEA 2021 exhibition in mid-July.

The 747MM, developed using internal funding, features a specially designed glass reinforced plastic hull joined to side-forming air-tubes with six air chambers. The hull measures 7.65 m long, 2.9 m wide, and has a draft of 0.52 m.

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

The USV is powered by two 225 hp Mercury engines that enable cruise and sprint speeds of 29 kt and 55 kt respectively. The sea vehicle is designed to operate out to a maximum range of up to 500 n miles in sea state 4, although range is also dependant on load.

According to Barracuda, the USV can be optionally manned by two personnel and is equipped with two shock-absorbing seats within its low-profile cabin. It can also carry up to 14 people and can be used to support special forces or search-and-rescue (SAR) operations.

The seaframe also features an anti-explosion, detachable epoxy fuel tank with non-positive displacement fuel system, a self-draining anchor compartment, bilge bump, and deck. Internal spaces positioned at each side of the hull walls can be used to house a wide range of mission equipment

The company has placed an emphasis on survivability, with the USV able to maintain operation with fully deflated air chambers in conditions of up to sea state 6. Barracuda also claims that the vehicle's low centre of gravity and its hull design enable it to survive in extreme conditions of up to sea state 9.

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/barracuda-unveils-747mm-usv/

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcase...

Barracuda unveils 747MM USV

by Dimitrios Mitsopoulos

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcased its indigenously developed Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission (747MM) unmanned surface vehicle (USV) in public for the first time at the DEFEA 2021 exhibition in mid-July.

The 747MM, developed using internal funding, features a specially designed glass reinforced plastic hull joined to side-forming air-tubes with six air chambers. The hull measures 7.65 m long, 2.9 m wide, and has a draft of 0.52 m.

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

The USV is powered by two 225 hp Mercury engines that enable cruise and sprint speeds of 29 kt and 55 kt respectively. The sea vehicle is designed to operate out to a maximum range of up to 500 n miles in sea state 4, although range is also dependant on load.

According to Barracuda, the USV can be optionally manned by two personnel and is equipped with two shock-absorbing seats within its low-profile cabin. It can also carry up to 14 people and can be used to support special forces or search-and-rescue (SAR) operations.


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/barracuda-unveils-747mm-usv/

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcase...

Barracuda unveils 747MM USV

by Dimitrios Mitsopoulos

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcased its indigenously developed Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission (747MM) unmanned surface vehicle (USV) in public for the first time at the DEFEA 2021 exhibition in mid-July.

The 747MM, developed using internal funding, features a specially designed glass reinforced plastic hull joined to side-forming air-tubes with six air chambers. The hull measures 7.65 m long, 2.9 m wide, and has a draft of 0.52 m.

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

The USV is powered by two 225 hp Mercury engines that enable cruise and sprint speeds of 29 kt and 55 kt respectively. The sea vehicle is designed to operate out to a maximum range of up to 500 n miles in sea state 4, although range is also dependant on load.

According to Barracuda, the USV can be optionally manned by two personnel and is equipped with two shock-absorbing seats within its low-profile cabin. It can also carry up to 14 people and can be used to support special forces or search-and-rescue (SAR) operations.


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/barracuda-unveils-747mm-usv/

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcase...

Barracuda unveils 747MM USV

by Dimitrios Mitsopoulos

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcased its indigenously developed Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission (747MM) unmanned surface vehicle (USV) in public for the first time at the DEFEA 2021 exhibition in mid-July.

The 747MM, developed using internal funding, features a specially designed glass reinforced plastic hull joined to side-forming air-tubes with six air chambers. The hull measures 7.65 m long, 2.9 m wide, and has a draft of 0.52 m.

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

The USV is powered by two 225 hp Mercury engines that enable cruise and sprint speeds of 29 kt and 55 kt respectively. The sea vehicle is designed to operate out to a maximum range of up to 500 n miles in sea state 4, although range is also dependant on load.

According to Barracuda, the USV can be optionally manned by two personnel and is equipped with two shock-absorbing seats within its low-profile cabin. It can also carry up to 14 people and can be used to support special forces or search-and-rescue (SAR) operations.


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/barracuda-unveils-747mm-usv/

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcase...

Barracuda unveils 747MM USV

by Dimitrios Mitsopoulos

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcased its indigenously developed Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission (747MM) unmanned surface vehicle (USV) in public for the first time at the DEFEA 2021 exhibition in mid-July.

The 747MM, developed using internal funding, features a specially designed glass reinforced plastic hull joined to side-forming air-tubes with six air chambers. The hull measures 7.65 m long, 2.9 m wide, and has a draft of 0.52 m.

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

The USV is powered by two 225 hp Mercury engines that enable cruise and sprint speeds of 29 kt and 55 kt respectively. The sea vehicle is designed to operate out to a maximum range of up to 500 n miles in sea state 4, although range is also dependant on load.

According to Barracuda, the USV can be optionally manned by two personnel and is equipped with two shock-absorbing seats within its low-profile cabin. It can also carry up to 14 people and can be used to support special forces or search-and-rescue (SAR) operations.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/barracuda-unveils-747mm-usv/

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcase...

Barracuda unveils 747MM USV

by Dimitrios Mitsopoulos

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcased its indigenously developed Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission (747MM) unmanned surface vehicle (USV) in public for the first time at the DEFEA 2021 exhibition in mid-July.

The 747MM, developed using internal funding, features a specially designed glass reinforced plastic hull joined to side-forming air-tubes with six air chambers. The hull measures 7.65 m long, 2.9 m wide, and has a draft of 0.52 m.

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

The USV is powered by two 225 hp Mercury engines that enable cruise and sprint speeds of 29 kt and 55 kt respectively. The sea vehicle is designed to operate out to a maximum range of up to 500 n miles in sea state 4, although range is also dependant on load.

According to Barracuda, the USV can be optionally manned by two personnel and is equipped with two shock-absorbing seats within its low-profile cabin. It can also carry up to 14 people and can be used to support special forces or search-and-rescue (SAR) operations.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/barracuda-unveils-747mm-usv/

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcase...

Barracuda unveils 747MM USV

by Dimitrios Mitsopoulos

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcased its indigenously developed Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission (747MM) unmanned surface vehicle (USV) in public for the first time at the DEFEA 2021 exhibition in mid-July.

The 747MM, developed using internal funding, features a specially designed glass reinforced plastic hull joined to side-forming air-tubes with six air chambers. The hull measures 7.65 m long, 2.9 m wide, and has a draft of 0.52 m.

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

The USV is powered by two 225 hp Mercury engines that enable cruise and sprint speeds of 29 kt and 55 kt respectively. The sea vehicle is designed to operate out to a maximum range of up to 500 n miles in sea state 4, although range is also dependant on load.

According to Barracuda, the USV can be optionally manned by two personnel and is equipped with two shock-absorbing seats within its low-profile cabin. It can also carry up to 14 people and can be used to support special forces or search-and-rescue (SAR) operations.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/barracuda-unveils-747mm-usv/

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcase...

Barracuda unveils 747MM USV

by Dimitrios Mitsopoulos

Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcased its indigenously developed Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission (747MM) unmanned surface vehicle (USV) in public for the first time at the DEFEA 2021 exhibition in mid-July.

The 747MM, developed using internal funding, features a specially designed glass reinforced plastic hull joined to side-forming air-tubes with six air chambers. The hull measures 7.65 m long, 2.9 m wide, and has a draft of 0.52 m.

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

Barracuda 747 Multi-Mission USV shown at DEFEA 2021. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)

The USV is powered by two 225 hp Mercury engines that enable cruise and sprint speeds of 29 kt and 55 kt respectively. The sea vehicle is designed to operate out to a maximum range of up to 500 n miles in sea state 4, although range is also dependant on load.

According to Barracuda, the USV can be optionally manned by two personnel and is equipped with two shock-absorbing seats within its low-profile cabin. It can also carry up to 14 people and can be used to support special forces or search-and-rescue (SAR) operations.


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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Athens-based commercial and military rigid inflatable boat (RIB) manufacturer Barracuda has showcase...

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