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Babcock, Leonardo expand FAcT team for Canada

by Gareth Jennings

Leonardo has previously said that the M-345 High Efficiency Trainer (HET) aircraft may form part of its FAcT bid for Canada. (Leonardo)

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT) programme, with three new companies added on 10 September.

Having announced their collaboration as Babcock Leonardo Canadian Aircrew Training in May, the two companies have now added FlightSafety International (FSI), L3Harris Technologies, and Top Aces as strategic partners for the FAcT competition that covers all facets of Canada's military flight-training requirements.

As noted by the prime contractors, FlightSafety International is a professional aviation training company and supplier of flight simulators, visual systems, and displays to commercial, government, and military organisations; L3Harris is one of Canada's largest and most diverse defence and security companies; while Ottawa-based Top Aces provides advanced adversary and joint terminal attack controller training to air forces around the world.

A formal request for proposals (RFP) for FAcT expected this year, with a contract award following in 2023. Given the high-profile withdrawals of Airbus, BAE Systems, and Lockheed Martin from the programme, only Babcock Leonardo and SkyAlyne Canada Limited Partnership are competing for the FAcT requirement.

One contract will be issued to cover all the requirements, including maintenance and infrastructure services. The contract period is expected to be at least 20 years. Flight training services are located at 15 Wing Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan; 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta; Southport (formerly known as Canadian Forces Base Portage la Prairie), Manitoba; and 17 Wing, Winnipeg. FAcT services will continue at these same locations, the government has said.

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/babcock-leonardo-expand-fact-team-for-canada/

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT)...

Babcock, Leonardo expand FAcT team for Canada

by Gareth Jennings

Leonardo has previously said that the M-345 High Efficiency Trainer (HET) aircraft may form part of its FAcT bid for Canada. (Leonardo)

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT) programme, with three new companies added on 10 September.

Having announced their collaboration as Babcock Leonardo Canadian Aircrew Training in May, the two companies have now added FlightSafety International (FSI), L3Harris Technologies, and Top Aces as strategic partners for the FAcT competition that covers all facets of Canada's military flight-training requirements.

As noted by the prime contractors, FlightSafety International is a professional aviation training company and supplier of flight simulators, visual systems, and displays to commercial, government, and military organisations; L3Harris is one of Canada's largest and most diverse defence and security companies; while Ottawa-based Top Aces provides advanced adversary and joint terminal attack controller training to air forces around the world.

A formal request for proposals (RFP) for FAcT expected this year, with a contract award following in 2023. Given the high-profile withdrawals of Airbus, BAE Systems, and Lockheed Martin from the programme, only Babcock Leonardo and SkyAlyne Canada Limited Partnership are competing for the FAcT requirement.


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Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


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Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/babcock-leonardo-expand-fact-team-for-canada/

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT)...

Babcock, Leonardo expand FAcT team for Canada

by Gareth Jennings

Leonardo has previously said that the M-345 High Efficiency Trainer (HET) aircraft may form part of its FAcT bid for Canada. (Leonardo)

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT) programme, with three new companies added on 10 September.

Having announced their collaboration as Babcock Leonardo Canadian Aircrew Training in May, the two companies have now added FlightSafety International (FSI), L3Harris Technologies, and Top Aces as strategic partners for the FAcT competition that covers all facets of Canada's military flight-training requirements.

As noted by the prime contractors, FlightSafety International is a professional aviation training company and supplier of flight simulators, visual systems, and displays to commercial, government, and military organisations; L3Harris is one of Canada's largest and most diverse defence and security companies; while Ottawa-based Top Aces provides advanced adversary and joint terminal attack controller training to air forces around the world.

A formal request for proposals (RFP) for FAcT expected this year, with a contract award following in 2023. Given the high-profile withdrawals of Airbus, BAE Systems, and Lockheed Martin from the programme, only Babcock Leonardo and SkyAlyne Canada Limited Partnership are competing for the FAcT requirement.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/babcock-leonardo-expand-fact-team-for-canada/

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT)...

Babcock, Leonardo expand FAcT team for Canada

by Gareth Jennings

Leonardo has previously said that the M-345 High Efficiency Trainer (HET) aircraft may form part of its FAcT bid for Canada. (Leonardo)

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT) programme, with three new companies added on 10 September.

Having announced their collaboration as Babcock Leonardo Canadian Aircrew Training in May, the two companies have now added FlightSafety International (FSI), L3Harris Technologies, and Top Aces as strategic partners for the FAcT competition that covers all facets of Canada's military flight-training requirements.

As noted by the prime contractors, FlightSafety International is a professional aviation training company and supplier of flight simulators, visual systems, and displays to commercial, government, and military organisations; L3Harris is one of Canada's largest and most diverse defence and security companies; while Ottawa-based Top Aces provides advanced adversary and joint terminal attack controller training to air forces around the world.

A formal request for proposals (RFP) for FAcT expected this year, with a contract award following in 2023. Given the high-profile withdrawals of Airbus, BAE Systems, and Lockheed Martin from the programme, only Babcock Leonardo and SkyAlyne Canada Limited Partnership are competing for the FAcT requirement.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/babcock-leonardo-expand-fact-team-for-canada/

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT)...

Babcock, Leonardo expand FAcT team for Canada

by Gareth Jennings

Leonardo has previously said that the M-345 High Efficiency Trainer (HET) aircraft may form part of its FAcT bid for Canada. (Leonardo)

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT) programme, with three new companies added on 10 September.

Having announced their collaboration as Babcock Leonardo Canadian Aircrew Training in May, the two companies have now added FlightSafety International (FSI), L3Harris Technologies, and Top Aces as strategic partners for the FAcT competition that covers all facets of Canada's military flight-training requirements.

As noted by the prime contractors, FlightSafety International is a professional aviation training company and supplier of flight simulators, visual systems, and displays to commercial, government, and military organisations; L3Harris is one of Canada's largest and most diverse defence and security companies; while Ottawa-based Top Aces provides advanced adversary and joint terminal attack controller training to air forces around the world.

A formal request for proposals (RFP) for FAcT expected this year, with a contract award following in 2023. Given the high-profile withdrawals of Airbus, BAE Systems, and Lockheed Martin from the programme, only Babcock Leonardo and SkyAlyne Canada Limited Partnership are competing for the FAcT requirement.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/babcock-leonardo-expand-fact-team-for-canada/

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT)...

Babcock, Leonardo expand FAcT team for Canada

by Gareth Jennings

Leonardo has previously said that the M-345 High Efficiency Trainer (HET) aircraft may form part of its FAcT bid for Canada. (Leonardo)

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT) programme, with three new companies added on 10 September.

Having announced their collaboration as Babcock Leonardo Canadian Aircrew Training in May, the two companies have now added FlightSafety International (FSI), L3Harris Technologies, and Top Aces as strategic partners for the FAcT competition that covers all facets of Canada's military flight-training requirements.

As noted by the prime contractors, FlightSafety International is a professional aviation training company and supplier of flight simulators, visual systems, and displays to commercial, government, and military organisations; L3Harris is one of Canada's largest and most diverse defence and security companies; while Ottawa-based Top Aces provides advanced adversary and joint terminal attack controller training to air forces around the world.

A formal request for proposals (RFP) for FAcT expected this year, with a contract award following in 2023. Given the high-profile withdrawals of Airbus, BAE Systems, and Lockheed Martin from the programme, only Babcock Leonardo and SkyAlyne Canada Limited Partnership are competing for the FAcT requirement.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/babcock-leonardo-expand-fact-team-for-canada/

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT)...

Babcock, Leonardo expand FAcT team for Canada

by Gareth Jennings

Leonardo has previously said that the M-345 High Efficiency Trainer (HET) aircraft may form part of its FAcT bid for Canada. (Leonardo)

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT) programme, with three new companies added on 10 September.

Having announced their collaboration as Babcock Leonardo Canadian Aircrew Training in May, the two companies have now added FlightSafety International (FSI), L3Harris Technologies, and Top Aces as strategic partners for the FAcT competition that covers all facets of Canada's military flight-training requirements.

As noted by the prime contractors, FlightSafety International is a professional aviation training company and supplier of flight simulators, visual systems, and displays to commercial, government, and military organisations; L3Harris is one of Canada's largest and most diverse defence and security companies; while Ottawa-based Top Aces provides advanced adversary and joint terminal attack controller training to air forces around the world.

A formal request for proposals (RFP) for FAcT expected this year, with a contract award following in 2023. Given the high-profile withdrawals of Airbus, BAE Systems, and Lockheed Martin from the programme, only Babcock Leonardo and SkyAlyne Canada Limited Partnership are competing for the FAcT requirement.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/babcock-leonardo-expand-fact-team-for-canada/

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT)...

Babcock, Leonardo expand FAcT team for Canada

by Gareth Jennings

Leonardo has previously said that the M-345 High Efficiency Trainer (HET) aircraft may form part of its FAcT bid for Canada. (Leonardo)

Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT) programme, with three new companies added on 10 September.

Having announced their collaboration as Babcock Leonardo Canadian Aircrew Training in May, the two companies have now added FlightSafety International (FSI), L3Harris Technologies, and Top Aces as strategic partners for the FAcT competition that covers all facets of Canada's military flight-training requirements.

As noted by the prime contractors, FlightSafety International is a professional aviation training company and supplier of flight simulators, visual systems, and displays to commercial, government, and military organisations; L3Harris is one of Canada's largest and most diverse defence and security companies; while Ottawa-based Top Aces provides advanced adversary and joint terminal attack controller training to air forces around the world.

A formal request for proposals (RFP) for FAcT expected this year, with a contract award following in 2023. Given the high-profile withdrawals of Airbus, BAE Systems, and Lockheed Martin from the programme, only Babcock Leonardo and SkyAlyne Canada Limited Partnership are competing for the FAcT requirement.


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Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


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Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


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Babcock and Leonardo have expanded their team to compete for Canada's Future Aircrew Training (FAcT)...

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