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Sea Platforms

Australia commissions second Hobart-class destroyer

28 October 2018
HMAS Brisbane, the second Australian-built Hobart-class guided missile destroyer, at its commissioning ceremony on 27 October 2018. Source: Commonwealth of Australia

Key Points

  • The Royal Australia Navy has commissioned its second Hobart-class air warfare destroyer
  • Vessel bolsters the service's collaborative defence capabilities against hostile aircraft, and precision-guided munitions

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) has taken another step towards bolstering its multi-layered system of at-sea defences against aircraft and missiles by commissioning its second Hobart-class air warfare destroyer (AWD).

The vessel, HMAS Brisbane (41), was officially inducted on 27 October in a commissioning ceremony at Garden Island Naval Base, Sydney.

Brisbane is part of a three-ship programme to replace the RAN's fleet of Adelaide-class (US Oliver Hazard Perry design) guided-missile frigates that have been in service since the early 1990s. First-of-class AWD, HMAS Hobart (39), was commissioned in September 2017.

The Hobart class is derived from Navantia's F-100 Alvaro de Bazan-class frigate design, and incorporates the Aegis combat system. The vessel's suite of sensors includes the Lockheed Martin and Raytheon AN/SPY 1D(V) phased array radar, and the Northrop Grumman AN/SPQ-9B surface search radar.

The 6,350-tonne class has an overall length of 146.7 m, an overall beam of 18.6 m, and a hull draught of 4.9 m. It is powered by two General Electric LM2500 gas turbine, and two Caterpillar diesel engines in a combined diesel or gas (CODOG) configuration, and can attain a top speed of 28 kt, and a standard range of 5,000 n miles at 18 kt.

The vessel is armed with the 48-cell MK 41 vertical launch system (VLS) that can deploy Standard Missile-2 medium-range Block IIIA (SM-2MR Block IIIA), and SM-2MR Block IIIB long-range surface-to-air missiles. This VLS can also launch the Raytheon RIM-162B Evolved Seasparrow Missile (ESSM), which has a maximum range of about 30 n miles, further augmenting the class' fleet-area air defence capabilities.

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