CONTENT PREVIEW
C4iSR: Joint & Common Equipment

Russia reveals two new 1L122E-series air-defence radars

03 July 2018

Russia’s NNIIRT 1L122-1E portable air-defence radar can be disassembled into portable modules weighing no more than 30 kg each. (Christopher F Foss)Russia’s NNIIRT 1L122-1E portable air-defence radar can be disassembled into portable modules weighing no more than 30 kg each. (Christopher F Foss)Russia’s NNIIRT facility, part of the Almaz-Antey group, has detailed its latest 1L122E-series air-defence radar systems that it is now offering on the export market.

The systems include the 1L122-1E tripod-mounted radar and the larger 1L122-2E that is typically mounted on the roof of a tracked MT-LBus Armoured Command and Reconnaissance Vehicle (ACRV).

Both of these air-defence radars are claimed to be able to detect a variety of targets including aircraft, helicopters, cruise missiles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

The radars are fitted with an identification, friend or foe (IFF) capability and are claimed to be highly automated to reduce operator fatigue.

The tripod-mounted 1L122-1E can be disassembled into individual parts weighing no less than 30 kg, and rapidly reassembled when it is in position. The tripod’s three legs are all adjustable to suit the terrain.

The larger 1L122-2E is mounted on a scissors type arm on the roof of the ACRV, and, in the stationary configuration, the arm can be rapidly raised to provide increased radar coverage. According to NNIIRT, the radar can also be operated with the scissors lowered into the horizontal position when in the travelling position.

The standard ACRV is fully amphibious, but it is understood that the radar vehicle is not amphibious. Mounted at the hull’s rear is an auxiliary power unit allowing the radar and other subsystems to be operated when the main engine is off.

Moreover, the Russian KBM Joint Stock Company (JSC) is marketing two versions of the Tigr 4x4 light armoured vehicle (LAV) for use with its fire-and-forget missiles. These are the 9A332 Combat Vehicle for a MANPADS squad, and the 9S937 Reconnaissance and Control Vehicle for the MANPADS platoon commander.

The latter is fitted with a roof-mounted 1L122-1E radar that is retracted into the horizontal position for travelling, and can typically control up to six MANPAD squads.

Want to read more? For analysis on this article and access to all our insight content, please enquire about our subscription options at ihs.com/contact





(331 of 456 words)
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT