CONTENT PREVIEW
Land Platforms

Ukraine re-roles 2S1 SPH for infantry combat

29 April 2018

Ukraine’s UkrInnMash Corporation is now offering the Kevlar-E infantry fighting vehicle (IFV) based on the Russian 122 mm 2S1 self-propelled howitzer (SPH) platform.

The original turret 2S1 SPH has been removed and the area to the immediate rear of the diesel power pack and driver’s position at the front of the vehicle raised to provide greater internal volume for its new mission.

The Kevlar-E is based on a surplus 122 mm 2S1 self-propelled howitzer and is shown here fitted with the locally developed Shturm remote weapon station. The six dismounts can rapidly enter and leave via the power operated ramp in the rear. (UkrInnMash)The Kevlar-E is based on a surplus 122 mm 2S1 self-propelled howitzer and is shown here fitted with the locally developed Shturm remote weapon station. The six dismounts can rapidly enter and leave via the power operated ramp in the rear. (UkrInnMash)

The re-roled vehicle now accommodates six dismounts in addition to the three-person crew comprising the commander, gunner, and driver. The dismounts are seated three on either side facing inwards on foldable, blast attenuating seats. A new power-operated ramp with an emergency exit is now built to the rear. Two roof hatches are also located above the troop compartment.

When fitted with the BM-3 Shturm remotely operated weapon system, the Kelvar-E is stated to have a combat weight of 16.7 tonnes. The original 2S1 SPH had a combat weight of 15.7 tonnes. Other customer-specified weapons can also be integrated.

The original powerpack – a 300-hp V8 water-cooled diesel engine coupled to a manual transmission – has been replaced with a Western Caterpillar, Cummins, or Deutz diesel engine, developing 420hp that provides a power-to-weight ratio of 25 hp/tonne, maximum road speed of up to 70 km/h, and a range of up to 600 km.

The diesel engine is presently coupled to a manual transmission, but this could be replaced by a fully automatic transmission to reduce driver fatigue.

Like the original 2S1 SPH, the Kevlar-E is fully amphibious and is powered in the water by its tracks at a speed of up to 5 km/h.

Standard equipment includes air conditioning, a fire detection and suppression system, a nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) system, a land navigation system, as well as passive night-vision equipment and cameras to provide situational awareness through a full 360°.

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