CONTENT PREVIEW
CBRNE & EOD Defence

AUSA 2017: IAI enhances AMMAD system

12 October 2017

Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) showcased the latest update to its Anti-Magnetic Mine Actuating Device (AMMAD) that now includes the ability to neutralize active land-based magnetic mines.IAI displayed a model of its AMMAD anti-magnetic mine system at the annual AUSA symposium. AMMAD Mk II now includes an active mine detonation capability. (IHS Markit/Geoff Fein)IAI displayed a model of its AMMAD anti-magnetic mine system at the annual AUSA symposium. AMMAD Mk II now includes an active mine detonation capability. (IHS Markit/Geoff Fein)

After more than a decade of improvements and upgrades to the system, it has been re-designated as the AMMAD Mk 2.

AMMAD detonates threats by generating a magnetic field that precedes the vehicle at a stand-off range. However, it is not a stand-alone system, David Hornstein, marketing manager for IAI, told Jane’s at the annual Association of the US Army symposium, in Washington, DC.

The AMAAD Mk II provides an end-to-end solution to defeat active mines - which create their own magnetic field - and passive magnetic types, Hornstein added. Buried and surface-laid mines can be engaged.

A standard AMMAD Mk II is equipped with four emitters – two for passive and two for active magnetic mines – a control unit, a power box that houses the waveform generation circuitry, and mechanical mounting hardware. The entire system weighs approximately 200 kg, and is vehicle agnostic; it operates alongside mine clearing attachments, such as a roller or plough.

AMMAD Mk 2 draws on host vehicle power, but only at 24 V and the control system inside the vehicle is a simple box with an on/off switch and four LED lights to show the four actuators are working.

Tests of the system have been carried out on-board unmanned ground vehicles.

It is designed to activate mines in a ‘kill zone’ of about 3.5 m ahead of the vehicle to defeat smarter mines with seismic sensors, which could recognise an anomaly between the seismic and magnetic signal.

Since the original AMMAD was produced more than a decade ago, the system has shrunk in size, and is now programmable, enabling the user to update waveforms as future threats arise.

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