CONTENT PREVIEW
C4iSR: Air

Indian Jaguar 'test-flown with AESA radar'

14 August 2017

Key Points

  • HAL says it has test-flown a Jaguar fitted with an AESA radar
  • It remains unclear how many Jaguars are likely to receive such an upgrade

India’s state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) claims to have successfully test-flown an Indian Air Force (IAF) SEPECAT Jaguar multirole fighter fitted with an imported active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar in Bangalore on 10 August.Although HAL said an Indian Jaguar has flown with an AESA radar, it is unclear how many aircraft will ultimately receive such an upgrade. (Indian Air Force)Although HAL said an Indian Jaguar has flown with an AESA radar, it is unclear how many aircraft will ultimately receive such an upgrade. (Indian Air Force)

The Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI)/Elta-built radar, ground tested in February, would allow the Jaguars to track multiple targets and communicate in multiple frequencies via a higher bandwidth, HAL officials told Jane’s . It would also offer the twin-engine Jaguars “interleaved modes of operation, and higher accuracy and image resolution” as part of their ongoing upgrade by HAL aimed at extending their operational life by more than a decade.

Additional trials are needed before the AESA radar can integrated onto the Jaguars as part of their avionics architecture, HAL officials said. They declined to confirm which system is featured in the trials, although IAF sources have indicated it is the ELM-2052, which is the only AESA-type fire-control radar on the Elta website.

Alongside this radar the retrofitted Jaguars, according to IAF sources, are also likely to receive a pod-mounted radar jammer, which could be the Elta ELL-8212/22 or ELL-8251.

It remains unclear how many of the IAF’s 60 of about 120 IS/IM/IB licence-built Jaguars earmarked for an upgrade would eventually be fitted with the AESA radar.

Senior IAF officers said that, while the IAF’s fleet of 18-20 Jaguar IM maritime anti-shipping variants could accommodate the AESA radar, the nose of the Jaguar IS land-strike version – fitted with a cockpit laser designation system – would require modifications to take it.

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