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UK invests in ‘smart' missile systems

by Gareth Jennings

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD) programme.

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

Announced on 1 July, the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl)-led project will explore how inter-missile communication can enable the weapons systems to work together and improve the performance of current systems.

“The project aims to increase the flexibility of missiles, ensuring that they can react to a changing threat or situation as it emerges, and improve their responsiveness. It will change the way missiles operate together, with an upgrade to the software system that allows this co-operative behaviour,” the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said.

Work on CSWTD began in April and is expected to last just over two years. “The current stage of the programme sees Dstl scientists assessing different military tactics and scenarios in close collaboration with industry partner MBDA,” the MoD said, adding, “A demonstration will take place throughout the project and, if successful, UK platforms could be exploiting the benefits of a smarter integrated network of missiles within five years.”

As noted by the MoD, the initial investment into CSWTD of GBP3.5 million (USD4.8 million) is part of a wider GBP6.6 billion for defence research and development recently announced by the UK government.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/uk-invests-in-smart-missile-systems/

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-o...

UK invests in ‘smart' missile systems

by Gareth Jennings

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD) programme.

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

Announced on 1 July, the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl)-led project will explore how inter-missile communication can enable the weapons systems to work together and improve the performance of current systems.

“The project aims to increase the flexibility of missiles, ensuring that they can react to a changing threat or situation as it emerges, and improve their responsiveness. It will change the way missiles operate together, with an upgrade to the software system that allows this co-operative behaviour,” the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said.


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DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/uk-invests-in-smart-missile-systems/

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-o...

UK invests in ‘smart' missile systems

by Gareth Jennings

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD) programme.

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

Announced on 1 July, the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl)-led project will explore how inter-missile communication can enable the weapons systems to work together and improve the performance of current systems.

“The project aims to increase the flexibility of missiles, ensuring that they can react to a changing threat or situation as it emerges, and improve their responsiveness. It will change the way missiles operate together, with an upgrade to the software system that allows this co-operative behaviour,” the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/uk-invests-in-smart-missile-systems/

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-o...

UK invests in ‘smart' missile systems

by Gareth Jennings

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD) programme.

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

Announced on 1 July, the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl)-led project will explore how inter-missile communication can enable the weapons systems to work together and improve the performance of current systems.

“The project aims to increase the flexibility of missiles, ensuring that they can react to a changing threat or situation as it emerges, and improve their responsiveness. It will change the way missiles operate together, with an upgrade to the software system that allows this co-operative behaviour,” the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/uk-invests-in-smart-missile-systems/

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-o...

UK invests in ‘smart' missile systems

by Gareth Jennings

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD) programme.

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

Announced on 1 July, the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl)-led project will explore how inter-missile communication can enable the weapons systems to work together and improve the performance of current systems.

“The project aims to increase the flexibility of missiles, ensuring that they can react to a changing threat or situation as it emerges, and improve their responsiveness. It will change the way missiles operate together, with an upgrade to the software system that allows this co-operative behaviour,” the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/uk-invests-in-smart-missile-systems/

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-o...

UK invests in ‘smart' missile systems

by Gareth Jennings

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD) programme.

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

Announced on 1 July, the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl)-led project will explore how inter-missile communication can enable the weapons systems to work together and improve the performance of current systems.

“The project aims to increase the flexibility of missiles, ensuring that they can react to a changing threat or situation as it emerges, and improve their responsiveness. It will change the way missiles operate together, with an upgrade to the software system that allows this co-operative behaviour,” the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/uk-invests-in-smart-missile-systems/

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-o...

UK invests in ‘smart' missile systems

by Gareth Jennings

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD) programme.

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

Announced on 1 July, the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl)-led project will explore how inter-missile communication can enable the weapons systems to work together and improve the performance of current systems.

“The project aims to increase the flexibility of missiles, ensuring that they can react to a changing threat or situation as it emerges, and improve their responsiveness. It will change the way missiles operate together, with an upgrade to the software system that allows this co-operative behaviour,” the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/uk-invests-in-smart-missile-systems/

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-o...

UK invests in ‘smart' missile systems

by Gareth Jennings

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD) programme.

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

The Tempest future fighter is likely being earmarked as a host platform for ‘smart' missile systems that will emerge from the UK's Co-operative Strike Weapons Technology Demonstrator (CSWTD). (BAE Systems)

Announced on 1 July, the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl)-led project will explore how inter-missile communication can enable the weapons systems to work together and improve the performance of current systems.

“The project aims to increase the flexibility of missiles, ensuring that they can react to a changing threat or situation as it emerges, and improve their responsiveness. It will change the way missiles operate together, with an upgrade to the software system that allows this co-operative behaviour,” the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Hanwha Systems, LIG Nex1 secure contacts for South Korea's ANASIS-II

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

Portable terminals from Hanwha Systems for receiving data from South Korea's ANASIS-II military communications satellite. Hanwha System was awarded a KRW360 billion contract on 15 September for the production of both portable ground terminals and network control systems. (Hanwha Systems)

Hanwha Systems and LIG Nex1 announced on 15 September that they have secured contracts from South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) linked to ANASIS-II, the country's first dedicated military communications satellite.

Hanwha Systems said it was awarded a KRW360 billion (USD307 million) contract to both establish a network control system and manufacture portable ground terminals by 2024 linked to the ANASIS-II satellite system, which launched into space in July 2020.

On the same day, LIG Nex1 announced that it had secured a KRW214.6 billion (USD183 million) contract to series-produce terminals for the new military satellite communication system by 2025.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/uk-invests-in-smart-missile-systems/

The United Kingdom has launched the development of a range of ‘smart' missile systems under the Co-o...

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