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TransDigm explores selling several businesses

by Marc Selinger

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited as part of last year’s acquisition of fellow aircraft parts manufacturer Esterline Technologies, a TransDigm official said on 12 November.

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

The businesses that TransDigm might divest are not considered a good fit for the company, which prefers to manufacture proprietary aerospace products with significant aftermarket content, said Nick Howley, TransDigm’s executive chairman.

The “things that we are looking at [disposing] typically are not as proprietary as we like or don’t have as much aftermarket as we like”, Howley told analysts.

The businesses that might be sold account for about USD250–300 million in annual revenue and have profitability rates that are lower than the company’s average, according to Howley.

TransDigm has already divested two Esterline entities that did not align with the company’s strategy: Esterline Interface Technologies, which US private equity firm KPS Capital Partners acquired for USD190 million, and Souriau-Sunbank Connection Technologies, which Ireland-based Eaton Corporation purchased for USD920 million.

 

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TransDigm explores selling several businesses

by Marc Selinger

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited as part of last year’s acquisition of fellow aircraft parts manufacturer Esterline Technologies, a TransDigm official said on 12 November.

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

The businesses that TransDigm might divest are not considered a good fit for the company, which prefers to manufacture proprietary aerospace products with significant aftermarket content, said Nick Howley, TransDigm’s executive chairman.

The “things that we are looking at [disposing] typically are not as proprietary as we like or don’t have as much aftermarket as we like”, Howley told analysts.

The businesses that might be sold account for about USD250–300 million in annual revenue and have profitability rates that are lower than the company’s average, according to Howley.

TransDigm has already divested two Esterline entities that did not align with the company’s strategy: Esterline Interface Technologies, which US private equity firm KPS Capital Partners acquired for USD190 million, and Souriau-Sunbank Connection Technologies, which Ireland-based Eaton Corporation purchased for USD920 million.

 

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/transdigm-explores-selling-several-businesses/

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited a...

TransDigm explores selling several businesses

by Marc Selinger

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited as part of last year’s acquisition of fellow aircraft parts manufacturer Esterline Technologies, a TransDigm official said on 12 November.

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

The businesses that TransDigm might divest are not considered a good fit for the company, which prefers to manufacture proprietary aerospace products with significant aftermarket content, said Nick Howley, TransDigm’s executive chairman.

The “things that we are looking at [disposing] typically are not as proprietary as we like or don’t have as much aftermarket as we like”, Howley told analysts.

The businesses that might be sold account for about USD250–300 million in annual revenue and have profitability rates that are lower than the company’s average, according to Howley.

TransDigm has already divested two Esterline entities that did not align with the company’s strategy: Esterline Interface Technologies, which US private equity firm KPS Capital Partners acquired for USD190 million, and Souriau-Sunbank Connection Technologies, which Ireland-based Eaton Corporation purchased for USD920 million.

 

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/transdigm-explores-selling-several-businesses/

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited a...

TransDigm explores selling several businesses

by Marc Selinger

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited as part of last year’s acquisition of fellow aircraft parts manufacturer Esterline Technologies, a TransDigm official said on 12 November.

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

The businesses that TransDigm might divest are not considered a good fit for the company, which prefers to manufacture proprietary aerospace products with significant aftermarket content, said Nick Howley, TransDigm’s executive chairman.

The “things that we are looking at [disposing] typically are not as proprietary as we like or don’t have as much aftermarket as we like”, Howley told analysts.

The businesses that might be sold account for about USD250–300 million in annual revenue and have profitability rates that are lower than the company’s average, according to Howley.

TransDigm has already divested two Esterline entities that did not align with the company’s strategy: Esterline Interface Technologies, which US private equity firm KPS Capital Partners acquired for USD190 million, and Souriau-Sunbank Connection Technologies, which Ireland-based Eaton Corporation purchased for USD920 million.

 

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/transdigm-explores-selling-several-businesses/

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited a...

TransDigm explores selling several businesses

by Marc Selinger

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited as part of last year’s acquisition of fellow aircraft parts manufacturer Esterline Technologies, a TransDigm official said on 12 November.

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

The businesses that TransDigm might divest are not considered a good fit for the company, which prefers to manufacture proprietary aerospace products with significant aftermarket content, said Nick Howley, TransDigm’s executive chairman.

The “things that we are looking at [disposing] typically are not as proprietary as we like or don’t have as much aftermarket as we like”, Howley told analysts.

The businesses that might be sold account for about USD250–300 million in annual revenue and have profitability rates that are lower than the company’s average, according to Howley.

TransDigm has already divested two Esterline entities that did not align with the company’s strategy: Esterline Interface Technologies, which US private equity firm KPS Capital Partners acquired for USD190 million, and Souriau-Sunbank Connection Technologies, which Ireland-based Eaton Corporation purchased for USD920 million.

 

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/transdigm-explores-selling-several-businesses/

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited a...

TransDigm explores selling several businesses

by Marc Selinger

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited as part of last year’s acquisition of fellow aircraft parts manufacturer Esterline Technologies, a TransDigm official said on 12 November.

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

The businesses that TransDigm might divest are not considered a good fit for the company, which prefers to manufacture proprietary aerospace products with significant aftermarket content, said Nick Howley, TransDigm’s executive chairman.

The “things that we are looking at [disposing] typically are not as proprietary as we like or don’t have as much aftermarket as we like”, Howley told analysts.

The businesses that might be sold account for about USD250–300 million in annual revenue and have profitability rates that are lower than the company’s average, according to Howley.

TransDigm has already divested two Esterline entities that did not align with the company’s strategy: Esterline Interface Technologies, which US private equity firm KPS Capital Partners acquired for USD190 million, and Souriau-Sunbank Connection Technologies, which Ireland-based Eaton Corporation purchased for USD920 million.

 

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/transdigm-explores-selling-several-businesses/

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited a...

TransDigm explores selling several businesses

by Marc Selinger

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited as part of last year’s acquisition of fellow aircraft parts manufacturer Esterline Technologies, a TransDigm official said on 12 November.

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

The businesses that TransDigm might divest are not considered a good fit for the company, which prefers to manufacture proprietary aerospace products with significant aftermarket content, said Nick Howley, TransDigm’s executive chairman.

The “things that we are looking at [disposing] typically are not as proprietary as we like or don’t have as much aftermarket as we like”, Howley told analysts.

The businesses that might be sold account for about USD250–300 million in annual revenue and have profitability rates that are lower than the company’s average, according to Howley.

TransDigm has already divested two Esterline entities that did not align with the company’s strategy: Esterline Interface Technologies, which US private equity firm KPS Capital Partners acquired for USD190 million, and Souriau-Sunbank Connection Technologies, which Ireland-based Eaton Corporation purchased for USD920 million.

 

Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login
Interested in subscribing, see What we do

Share

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/transdigm-explores-selling-several-businesses/

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited a...

TransDigm explores selling several businesses

by Marc Selinger

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited as part of last year’s acquisition of fellow aircraft parts manufacturer Esterline Technologies, a TransDigm official said on 12 November.

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

TransDigm is based in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. (Getty Images)

The businesses that TransDigm might divest are not considered a good fit for the company, which prefers to manufacture proprietary aerospace products with significant aftermarket content, said Nick Howley, TransDigm’s executive chairman.

The “things that we are looking at [disposing] typically are not as proprietary as we like or don’t have as much aftermarket as we like”, Howley told analysts.

The businesses that might be sold account for about USD250–300 million in annual revenue and have profitability rates that are lower than the company’s average, according to Howley.

TransDigm has already divested two Esterline entities that did not align with the company’s strategy: Esterline Interface Technologies, which US private equity firm KPS Capital Partners acquired for USD190 million, and Souriau-Sunbank Connection Technologies, which Ireland-based Eaton Corporation purchased for USD920 million.

 

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Interested in subscribing, see What we do

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/transdigm-explores-selling-several-businesses/

US-based TransDigm Group is “actively considering” selling several defence businesses it inherited a...

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