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Thales, Scheibel complete S-100 UAS flight trials

by Richard Scott

Trials of the Camcopter S-100 took place off the North Wales coast in August. The I-Master radar gimbal unit is clearly visible beneath the fuselage. (Thales)

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) developed to meet emerging requirements for persistent over-the-horizon surveillance.

Leveraging Schiebel's Camcopter S-100 vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS, the two companies have developed an end-to-end maritime intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) solution designed to detect, fix, track, and identify surface threats such as fast inshore attack craft or waterborne improvised explosive devices. Initial flight testing with the multipayload system – including both radar and electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensors – was undertaken in west Wales during August 2021.

Thales and Schiebel announced in June that their teaming to pursue opportunities in the maritime UAS sector, with an initial focus on the UK market. According to Matt Moore, Thales business development lead for maritime air autonomy, the teaming with Schiebel reflects emerging customer requirements for more capable maritime UASs offering a wide area surveillance capability.

“The market is increasingly looking for a detect function, which effectively mandates a maritime radar,” Moore told Janes . “Our I-Master radar, integrated onto the S-100 air vehicle, embodies a maritime mode set to deliver wide area surveillance at sea.

“Alongside I-Master, we have baselined the IAI [Israel Aerospace Industries] POPUltra EO/IR payload for identification and observation, together with AIS [automatic identification system) and IFF [identification friend-or-foe].”

Thales and Schiebel have also worked to address the fusion, management, and dissemination of the ISTAR product, as well as its integration into a ship combat management system (CMS) environment.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/thales-scheibel-complete-s-100-uas-flight-trials/

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanne...

Thales, Scheibel complete S-100 UAS flight trials

by Richard Scott

Trials of the Camcopter S-100 took place off the North Wales coast in August. The I-Master radar gimbal unit is clearly visible beneath the fuselage. (Thales)

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) developed to meet emerging requirements for persistent over-the-horizon surveillance.

Leveraging Schiebel's Camcopter S-100 vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS, the two companies have developed an end-to-end maritime intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) solution designed to detect, fix, track, and identify surface threats such as fast inshore attack craft or waterborne improvised explosive devices. Initial flight testing with the multipayload system – including both radar and electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensors – was undertaken in west Wales during August 2021.

Thales and Schiebel announced in June that their teaming to pursue opportunities in the maritime UAS sector, with an initial focus on the UK market. According to Matt Moore, Thales business development lead for maritime air autonomy, the teaming with Schiebel reflects emerging customer requirements for more capable maritime UASs offering a wide area surveillance capability.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


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US Navy, for the first time, uses MQ-25A Stingray to refuel F-35C

by Pat Host

Boeing's MQ-25A Stingray T1 test asset transfers fuel to a US Navy F-35C on 13 September during a flight test mission, in which 125 kg of fuel was transferred over roughly 10 seconds. (Boeing)

The US Navy (USN) and Boeing used the MQ-25A Stingray unmanned aerial vehicle to pass fuel to a Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter receiver aircraft for the first time on 13 September.

During the three-hour flight, a USN F-35C pilot from Air Test Wing and Evaluation Squadron Two Three (VX-23) approached the Boeing-owned test asset Stingray, MQ-25 T1, and performed formation evaluations, wake surveys, and drogue tracking. It then plugged with the T1 at 225 kt calibrated airspeed at 10,000 ft altitude, according to a USN statement.

Boeing spokesperson Ashlee Erwin said on 14 September that 125 kg of fuel was transferred in approximately 10 seconds. She noted that this amount of fuel was a test offload similar to other refuelling flights the company has performed with the T1, and that operational refuelling will involve greater quantities of fuel.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/thales-scheibel-complete-s-100-uas-flight-trials/

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanne...

Thales, Scheibel complete S-100 UAS flight trials

by Richard Scott

Trials of the Camcopter S-100 took place off the North Wales coast in August. The I-Master radar gimbal unit is clearly visible beneath the fuselage. (Thales)

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) developed to meet emerging requirements for persistent over-the-horizon surveillance.

Leveraging Schiebel's Camcopter S-100 vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS, the two companies have developed an end-to-end maritime intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) solution designed to detect, fix, track, and identify surface threats such as fast inshore attack craft or waterborne improvised explosive devices. Initial flight testing with the multipayload system – including both radar and electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensors – was undertaken in west Wales during August 2021.

Thales and Schiebel announced in June that their teaming to pursue opportunities in the maritime UAS sector, with an initial focus on the UK market. According to Matt Moore, Thales business development lead for maritime air autonomy, the teaming with Schiebel reflects emerging customer requirements for more capable maritime UASs offering a wide area surveillance capability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


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US Navy, for the first time, uses MQ-25A Stingray to refuel F-35C

by Pat Host

Boeing's MQ-25A Stingray T1 test asset transfers fuel to a US Navy F-35C on 13 September during a flight test mission, in which 125 kg of fuel was transferred over roughly 10 seconds. (Boeing)

The US Navy (USN) and Boeing used the MQ-25A Stingray unmanned aerial vehicle to pass fuel to a Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter receiver aircraft for the first time on 13 September.

During the three-hour flight, a USN F-35C pilot from Air Test Wing and Evaluation Squadron Two Three (VX-23) approached the Boeing-owned test asset Stingray, MQ-25 T1, and performed formation evaluations, wake surveys, and drogue tracking. It then plugged with the T1 at 225 kt calibrated airspeed at 10,000 ft altitude, according to a USN statement.

Boeing spokesperson Ashlee Erwin said on 14 September that 125 kg of fuel was transferred in approximately 10 seconds. She noted that this amount of fuel was a test offload similar to other refuelling flights the company has performed with the T1, and that operational refuelling will involve greater quantities of fuel.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/thales-scheibel-complete-s-100-uas-flight-trials/

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanne...

Thales, Scheibel complete S-100 UAS flight trials

by Richard Scott

Trials of the Camcopter S-100 took place off the North Wales coast in August. The I-Master radar gimbal unit is clearly visible beneath the fuselage. (Thales)

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) developed to meet emerging requirements for persistent over-the-horizon surveillance.

Leveraging Schiebel's Camcopter S-100 vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS, the two companies have developed an end-to-end maritime intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) solution designed to detect, fix, track, and identify surface threats such as fast inshore attack craft or waterborne improvised explosive devices. Initial flight testing with the multipayload system – including both radar and electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensors – was undertaken in west Wales during August 2021.

Thales and Schiebel announced in June that their teaming to pursue opportunities in the maritime UAS sector, with an initial focus on the UK market. According to Matt Moore, Thales business development lead for maritime air autonomy, the teaming with Schiebel reflects emerging customer requirements for more capable maritime UASs offering a wide area surveillance capability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Navy, for the first time, uses MQ-25A Stingray to refuel F-35C

by Pat Host

Boeing's MQ-25A Stingray T1 test asset transfers fuel to a US Navy F-35C on 13 September during a flight test mission, in which 125 kg of fuel was transferred over roughly 10 seconds. (Boeing)

The US Navy (USN) and Boeing used the MQ-25A Stingray unmanned aerial vehicle to pass fuel to a Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter receiver aircraft for the first time on 13 September.

During the three-hour flight, a USN F-35C pilot from Air Test Wing and Evaluation Squadron Two Three (VX-23) approached the Boeing-owned test asset Stingray, MQ-25 T1, and performed formation evaluations, wake surveys, and drogue tracking. It then plugged with the T1 at 225 kt calibrated airspeed at 10,000 ft altitude, according to a USN statement.

Boeing spokesperson Ashlee Erwin said on 14 September that 125 kg of fuel was transferred in approximately 10 seconds. She noted that this amount of fuel was a test offload similar to other refuelling flights the company has performed with the T1, and that operational refuelling will involve greater quantities of fuel.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/thales-scheibel-complete-s-100-uas-flight-trials/

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanne...

Thales, Scheibel complete S-100 UAS flight trials

by Richard Scott

Trials of the Camcopter S-100 took place off the North Wales coast in August. The I-Master radar gimbal unit is clearly visible beneath the fuselage. (Thales)

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) developed to meet emerging requirements for persistent over-the-horizon surveillance.

Leveraging Schiebel's Camcopter S-100 vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS, the two companies have developed an end-to-end maritime intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) solution designed to detect, fix, track, and identify surface threats such as fast inshore attack craft or waterborne improvised explosive devices. Initial flight testing with the multipayload system – including both radar and electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensors – was undertaken in west Wales during August 2021.

Thales and Schiebel announced in June that their teaming to pursue opportunities in the maritime UAS sector, with an initial focus on the UK market. According to Matt Moore, Thales business development lead for maritime air autonomy, the teaming with Schiebel reflects emerging customer requirements for more capable maritime UASs offering a wide area surveillance capability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Navy, for the first time, uses MQ-25A Stingray to refuel F-35C

by Pat Host

Boeing's MQ-25A Stingray T1 test asset transfers fuel to a US Navy F-35C on 13 September during a flight test mission, in which 125 kg of fuel was transferred over roughly 10 seconds. (Boeing)

The US Navy (USN) and Boeing used the MQ-25A Stingray unmanned aerial vehicle to pass fuel to a Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter receiver aircraft for the first time on 13 September.

During the three-hour flight, a USN F-35C pilot from Air Test Wing and Evaluation Squadron Two Three (VX-23) approached the Boeing-owned test asset Stingray, MQ-25 T1, and performed formation evaluations, wake surveys, and drogue tracking. It then plugged with the T1 at 225 kt calibrated airspeed at 10,000 ft altitude, according to a USN statement.

Boeing spokesperson Ashlee Erwin said on 14 September that 125 kg of fuel was transferred in approximately 10 seconds. She noted that this amount of fuel was a test offload similar to other refuelling flights the company has performed with the T1, and that operational refuelling will involve greater quantities of fuel.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/thales-scheibel-complete-s-100-uas-flight-trials/

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanne...

Thales, Scheibel complete S-100 UAS flight trials

by Richard Scott

Trials of the Camcopter S-100 took place off the North Wales coast in August. The I-Master radar gimbal unit is clearly visible beneath the fuselage. (Thales)

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) developed to meet emerging requirements for persistent over-the-horizon surveillance.

Leveraging Schiebel's Camcopter S-100 vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS, the two companies have developed an end-to-end maritime intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) solution designed to detect, fix, track, and identify surface threats such as fast inshore attack craft or waterborne improvised explosive devices. Initial flight testing with the multipayload system – including both radar and electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensors – was undertaken in west Wales during August 2021.

Thales and Schiebel announced in June that their teaming to pursue opportunities in the maritime UAS sector, with an initial focus on the UK market. According to Matt Moore, Thales business development lead for maritime air autonomy, the teaming with Schiebel reflects emerging customer requirements for more capable maritime UASs offering a wide area surveillance capability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Navy, for the first time, uses MQ-25A Stingray to refuel F-35C

by Pat Host

Boeing's MQ-25A Stingray T1 test asset transfers fuel to a US Navy F-35C on 13 September during a flight test mission, in which 125 kg of fuel was transferred over roughly 10 seconds. (Boeing)

The US Navy (USN) and Boeing used the MQ-25A Stingray unmanned aerial vehicle to pass fuel to a Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter receiver aircraft for the first time on 13 September.

During the three-hour flight, a USN F-35C pilot from Air Test Wing and Evaluation Squadron Two Three (VX-23) approached the Boeing-owned test asset Stingray, MQ-25 T1, and performed formation evaluations, wake surveys, and drogue tracking. It then plugged with the T1 at 225 kt calibrated airspeed at 10,000 ft altitude, according to a USN statement.

Boeing spokesperson Ashlee Erwin said on 14 September that 125 kg of fuel was transferred in approximately 10 seconds. She noted that this amount of fuel was a test offload similar to other refuelling flights the company has performed with the T1, and that operational refuelling will involve greater quantities of fuel.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/thales-scheibel-complete-s-100-uas-flight-trials/

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanne...

Thales, Scheibel complete S-100 UAS flight trials

by Richard Scott

Trials of the Camcopter S-100 took place off the North Wales coast in August. The I-Master radar gimbal unit is clearly visible beneath the fuselage. (Thales)

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) developed to meet emerging requirements for persistent over-the-horizon surveillance.

Leveraging Schiebel's Camcopter S-100 vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS, the two companies have developed an end-to-end maritime intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) solution designed to detect, fix, track, and identify surface threats such as fast inshore attack craft or waterborne improvised explosive devices. Initial flight testing with the multipayload system – including both radar and electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensors – was undertaken in west Wales during August 2021.

Thales and Schiebel announced in June that their teaming to pursue opportunities in the maritime UAS sector, with an initial focus on the UK market. According to Matt Moore, Thales business development lead for maritime air autonomy, the teaming with Schiebel reflects emerging customer requirements for more capable maritime UASs offering a wide area surveillance capability.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


US Navy, for the first time, uses MQ-25A Stingray to refuel F-35C

by Pat Host

Boeing's MQ-25A Stingray T1 test asset transfers fuel to a US Navy F-35C on 13 September during a flight test mission, in which 125 kg of fuel was transferred over roughly 10 seconds. (Boeing)

The US Navy (USN) and Boeing used the MQ-25A Stingray unmanned aerial vehicle to pass fuel to a Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter receiver aircraft for the first time on 13 September.

During the three-hour flight, a USN F-35C pilot from Air Test Wing and Evaluation Squadron Two Three (VX-23) approached the Boeing-owned test asset Stingray, MQ-25 T1, and performed formation evaluations, wake surveys, and drogue tracking. It then plugged with the T1 at 225 kt calibrated airspeed at 10,000 ft altitude, according to a USN statement.

Boeing spokesperson Ashlee Erwin said on 14 September that 125 kg of fuel was transferred in approximately 10 seconds. She noted that this amount of fuel was a test offload similar to other refuelling flights the company has performed with the T1, and that operational refuelling will involve greater quantities of fuel.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/thales-scheibel-complete-s-100-uas-flight-trials/

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanne...

Thales, Scheibel complete S-100 UAS flight trials

by Richard Scott

Trials of the Camcopter S-100 took place off the North Wales coast in August. The I-Master radar gimbal unit is clearly visible beneath the fuselage. (Thales)

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) developed to meet emerging requirements for persistent over-the-horizon surveillance.

Leveraging Schiebel's Camcopter S-100 vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS, the two companies have developed an end-to-end maritime intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) solution designed to detect, fix, track, and identify surface threats such as fast inshore attack craft or waterborne improvised explosive devices. Initial flight testing with the multipayload system – including both radar and electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensors – was undertaken in west Wales during August 2021.

Thales and Schiebel announced in June that their teaming to pursue opportunities in the maritime UAS sector, with an initial focus on the UK market. According to Matt Moore, Thales business development lead for maritime air autonomy, the teaming with Schiebel reflects emerging customer requirements for more capable maritime UASs offering a wide area surveillance capability.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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RAF names 13 Sqn as second Protector unit

by Gareth Jennings

An artist's impression of the Protector RG1 in UK service. The type will be flown by 31 and 13 squadrons. (GA-ASI via Janes/Gareth Jennings)

The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) has named 13 Squadron as its second unit to operate the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9B Protector RG1 medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, made the announcement on 15 September, noting that 13 Squadron will join 31 Squadron (both former Panavia Tornado GR4 units) in fielding the certified UAV from the type's main operating base at RAF Waddington.

“I am delighted to announce that the second squadron to operate this new aircraft will be XIII [13] Squadron. Equipped with Protector, squadron personnel will be capable of operating anywhere in the world providing the United Kingdom with an operational advantage by delivering intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance effect at range and speed,” ACM Wigston was quoted as saying.


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US Navy, for the first time, uses MQ-25A Stingray to refuel F-35C

by Pat Host

Boeing's MQ-25A Stingray T1 test asset transfers fuel to a US Navy F-35C on 13 September during a flight test mission, in which 125 kg of fuel was transferred over roughly 10 seconds. (Boeing)

The US Navy (USN) and Boeing used the MQ-25A Stingray unmanned aerial vehicle to pass fuel to a Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter receiver aircraft for the first time on 13 September.

During the three-hour flight, a USN F-35C pilot from Air Test Wing and Evaluation Squadron Two Three (VX-23) approached the Boeing-owned test asset Stingray, MQ-25 T1, and performed formation evaluations, wake surveys, and drogue tracking. It then plugged with the T1 at 225 kt calibrated airspeed at 10,000 ft altitude, according to a USN statement.

Boeing spokesperson Ashlee Erwin said on 14 September that 125 kg of fuel was transferred in approximately 10 seconds. She noted that this amount of fuel was a test offload similar to other refuelling flights the company has performed with the T1, and that operational refuelling will involve greater quantities of fuel.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/thales-scheibel-complete-s-100-uas-flight-trials/

Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanne...

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