Washington to review export policies for Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Cyprus

by Charles Forrester

The US is ramping up export controls on Ethiopia and Eritrea in response to recent clashes between the two countries (Getty Images)

The US Department of State is preparing to add Ethiopia and Eritrea to its list of countries with a policy of denial for the transfer of military equipment under Section 126.1 of the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), while extending its waiver for Cyprus, Janes has learnt.

The updated policy toward Ethiopia and Eritrea came as a result of the recent conflict in the Tigray region in northern Ethiopia.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Biden says US would defend Taiwan if China attacked but White House backtracks

by Gabriel Dominguez

US President Joe Biden said on 21 October that the United States is committed to defending Taiwan if the island were to be attacked by China.

However, the remarks, which seemed to mark a departure from Washington's long-held policy of ‘strategic ambiguity', prompted the White House and the US State Department to backtrack and clarify that there has been “no change in our policy” vis-à-vis Taiwan.

Biden made the remarks during a town hall meeting organised by CNN. He also said, “China, Russia, and the rest of the world knows we have the most powerful military in history of the world. Don't worry about whether they're going to be more powerful. But what you do have to worry about is whether or not they're going to engage in activities [that] put them in a position where they may make a serious mistake.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


NATO allies to confront 21st century threats with new multidomain approach

by Brooks Tigner

NATO's newly approved Concept for Deterrence and Defence of the Euro-Atlantic Area calls for “the right forces at the right place at the right time”, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told reporters on 21 October. (NATO)

NATO defence ministers agreed on the first day of their 21–22 October meeting in Brussels to fundamentally change how they protect their collective territory against attacks, especially from Russia and terrorist groups. Their newly approved Concept for Deterrence and Defence of the Euro-Atlantic Area lays the groundwork for new sub-regional military planning in the coming months.

Noting that the concept calls for “the right forces at the right place at the right time”, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told reporters on 21 October that it will involve “significant improvement to our air and missile defences, strengthening our conventional capabilities with fifth-generation jets [and] adapting our exercises and intelligence”, among other changes.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Russian casualties mounting in Central African Republic: Janes Analysis

Reports indicate 11 Russian-backed contractors have been killed in the Central African Republic (CAR) since August: the first consistent reports of Russian fatalities since their deployment in 2018.

Correlating reports from local news organizations, Janes has identified four instances that resulted in the deaths of Russian-backed contractors.

Most recently, on 12 October, five foreign contractors were killed in an ambush laid by rebels in the Bombo area in western CAR. Three contractors were reportedly killed in an ambush near Bombo on 2 October. A contractor was killed when rebels ambushed a convoy near the Cameroonian border on 1 September. A further two Russian-backed contractors were reportedly killed in a rebel ambush in Koui, close to the CAR's border with Cameroon on 5 August.

Russian military contractors have been present in the CAR since 2018, when the UN Security Council approved their deployment to help train and advise Central African Armed Forces (FACA) personnel, as well as transport them to operational areas, provide logistical support, and medical evacuation.

The UN panel of experts that monitors the CAR reported in June that the number of contractors appeared to significantly exceed the authorized deployment and included non-Russians, including Arab speakers. They were also taking an active role in combat operations against rebel militias. It identified seven helicopters – some of them armed – and two An-28 transport aircraft that were being used by the contractors.

Imagery obtained from social media affiliated with the Russian military contractor community also indicates they are equipped with Russian-made Orlan-10 unmanned aerial vehicles and some light armored vehicles.

This article - published to Janes subscribers on 15 October 2021 - can be read in full by logging in here

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/terror-insurgent-group/latest/washington-to-review-export-policies-for-ethiopia-eritrea-and-cyprus

The US Department of State is preparing to add Ethiopia and Eritrea to its list of countries with a ...

Latest Podcasts

How to become an effective leader with Lt Col Langley Sharp

In this episode of the Janes podcast, Lt Col Langley Sharp shares lessons learned in leadership from his career in the Parachute Regiment which has seen him deployed to Northern Ireland, Macedonia, Afghanistan and Iraq. Among his many varied rol...

Listen now

Cryptocurrency and Terrorist Financing in the Middle East and North Africa

Incorporating OSINT into the Defence Intelligence Environment

Counter-terrorism: unpacking the concepts of 'sanctuaries' and 'safe havens'

Tackling the terrorist use of the internet

Janes Case Studies

Insight into Islamic State activity, profile and propaganda

View Case Study

An assessment of Iranian air defence

A competitive assessment of the military aircraft market

Identifying an unknown naval platform

Identifying an unknown aircraft

News Categories

Request Consultation

Request a free consultation to discover how Janes can provide you with assured, interconnected open-source intelligence.

Security Details