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TecnoVeritas readies UOPV prototype for naval trials

by Victor Barreira

Computer-generated imagery of the UOPV being developed by TecnoVeritas. (TecnoVeritas)

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-endurance unmanned surface vehicle (USV) prototype. Testing of Unmanned Oceanic Patrol Vessel (UOPV) is expected to begin in early 2022 with the Portuguese Navy.

The USV is designated the UOPV and features a fibreglass hull supplied by local shipbuilder Nautiber-Estaleiros Navais do Guadiana and is expected to displace 10 tonnes. The hull is equipped with solar panels, a mast, and a superstructure. It measures 8 m long, 2 m wide, with a 1.1 m draught.

The UOPV can carry a two-tonne payload with a total volume of approximately 2.5 m3. It can be equipped with a high-definition electro-optical infrared (EO/IR) system; an ultraviolet camera; an automatic identification system (AIS); a 3D doppler sonar; VHF, 3G and 4G communications; a satellite communications (satcom) terminal; GPS; two navigation computers; a low-power radar; a radar with automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA) capability; an auto-pilot system; a gyro-compass; a weather station; and a wind speed sensor.

Other optional equipment can include a rear-mounted launch and recovery system (LARS) for a rotary-wing reconnaissance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV); a tethered balloon fitted with an EO/IR payload; a flare launcher; a searchlight with 1,000 m range; a guided missile weapon system for surface-to-air missiles, a remote weapon station (RWS) armed with a 7.62 mm M134D machine gun; a multiple rocket launcher; and a life raft.

The USV can also deploy an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) using a bespoke LARS being developed by INOVA+.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/tecnoveritas-readies-uopv-prototype-for-naval-trials/

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-enduran...

TecnoVeritas readies UOPV prototype for naval trials

by Victor Barreira

Computer-generated imagery of the UOPV being developed by TecnoVeritas. (TecnoVeritas)

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-endurance unmanned surface vehicle (USV) prototype. Testing of Unmanned Oceanic Patrol Vessel (UOPV) is expected to begin in early 2022 with the Portuguese Navy.

The USV is designated the UOPV and features a fibreglass hull supplied by local shipbuilder Nautiber-Estaleiros Navais do Guadiana and is expected to displace 10 tonnes. The hull is equipped with solar panels, a mast, and a superstructure. It measures 8 m long, 2 m wide, with a 1.1 m draught.

The UOPV can carry a two-tonne payload with a total volume of approximately 2.5 m3. It can be equipped with a high-definition electro-optical infrared (EO/IR) system; an ultraviolet camera; an automatic identification system (AIS); a 3D doppler sonar; VHF, 3G and 4G communications; a satellite communications (satcom) terminal; GPS; two navigation computers; a low-power radar; a radar with automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA) capability; an auto-pilot system; a gyro-compass; a weather station; and a wind speed sensor.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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DSEI 2021: Royal Navy sets out its course to ‘podularisation'

by Richard Scott

The UK Royal Navy (RN) is pressing ahead with plans to develop and demonstrate a suite of modular and interchangeable mission containers that are designed to support the rapid deployment of role-based capability around the fleet.

Prototypes of Navy Persistent Operational Deployment System (NavyPODS) are planned to enter test and evaluation in early 2022. The RN foresees deployment of production-standard modules across a range of current and future platforms.

Being led by the navy's Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) organisation, the NavyPODS concept envisages the development of a range of platform-agnostic deployable mission modules, based on ISO-equivalent containers, involving any one of a number of mission payload facilities. Speaking at DSEI 2021 on 15 September, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, Second Sea Lord, said that rather than choosing to design modularity into platforms, the RN was looking to design it out. “Our concept is to simplify the ship [making it] utilitarian, adaptable, common, cheaper,” he said. “Capability will be defined by the modules you add to or remove from that ship based on the operational demand at that time.”


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RoCAF aircraft conduct first emergency landing drill on highway

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

RoCAF F-CK-1 Ching Kuo, F-16V, and Mirage 2000-5 fighter aircraft along with an E-2K aircraft during emergency take-off and landing drills that were conducted from a provincial highway in Taiwan on 15 September during this year's ‘Han Kuang' military exercises. (Military News Agency )

Republic of China Air Force (RoCAF) aircraft have taken part in a take-off and landing exercise in which they used highways as emergency airstrips for the first time.

The drill, which was aimed at testing the ability of RoCAF pilots to operate from narrow and shorter runways, was held on 15 September as part of Taiwan's annual ‘Han Kuang' military drills.

The manoeuvres involved four different aircraft: an Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation F-CK-1 Ching Kuo multirole Indigenous Defence Fighter, a recently upgraded Lockheed Martin F-16V combat aircraft, a Dassault Mirage 2000-5 fighter, and a Northrop Grumman E-2K airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) platform.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/tecnoveritas-readies-uopv-prototype-for-naval-trials/

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-enduran...

TecnoVeritas readies UOPV prototype for naval trials

by Victor Barreira

Computer-generated imagery of the UOPV being developed by TecnoVeritas. (TecnoVeritas)

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-endurance unmanned surface vehicle (USV) prototype. Testing of Unmanned Oceanic Patrol Vessel (UOPV) is expected to begin in early 2022 with the Portuguese Navy.

The USV is designated the UOPV and features a fibreglass hull supplied by local shipbuilder Nautiber-Estaleiros Navais do Guadiana and is expected to displace 10 tonnes. The hull is equipped with solar panels, a mast, and a superstructure. It measures 8 m long, 2 m wide, with a 1.1 m draught.

The UOPV can carry a two-tonne payload with a total volume of approximately 2.5 m3. It can be equipped with a high-definition electro-optical infrared (EO/IR) system; an ultraviolet camera; an automatic identification system (AIS); a 3D doppler sonar; VHF, 3G and 4G communications; a satellite communications (satcom) terminal; GPS; two navigation computers; a low-power radar; a radar with automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA) capability; an auto-pilot system; a gyro-compass; a weather station; and a wind speed sensor.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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DSEI 2021: Royal Navy sets out its course to ‘podularisation'

by Richard Scott

The UK Royal Navy (RN) is pressing ahead with plans to develop and demonstrate a suite of modular and interchangeable mission containers that are designed to support the rapid deployment of role-based capability around the fleet.

Prototypes of Navy Persistent Operational Deployment System (NavyPODS) are planned to enter test and evaluation in early 2022. The RN foresees deployment of production-standard modules across a range of current and future platforms.

Being led by the navy's Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) organisation, the NavyPODS concept envisages the development of a range of platform-agnostic deployable mission modules, based on ISO-equivalent containers, involving any one of a number of mission payload facilities. Speaking at DSEI 2021 on 15 September, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, Second Sea Lord, said that rather than choosing to design modularity into platforms, the RN was looking to design it out. “Our concept is to simplify the ship [making it] utilitarian, adaptable, common, cheaper,” he said. “Capability will be defined by the modules you add to or remove from that ship based on the operational demand at that time.”


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RoCAF aircraft conduct first emergency landing drill on highway

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

RoCAF F-CK-1 Ching Kuo, F-16V, and Mirage 2000-5 fighter aircraft along with an E-2K aircraft during emergency take-off and landing drills that were conducted from a provincial highway in Taiwan on 15 September during this year's ‘Han Kuang' military exercises. (Military News Agency )

Republic of China Air Force (RoCAF) aircraft have taken part in a take-off and landing exercise in which they used highways as emergency airstrips for the first time.

The drill, which was aimed at testing the ability of RoCAF pilots to operate from narrow and shorter runways, was held on 15 September as part of Taiwan's annual ‘Han Kuang' military drills.

The manoeuvres involved four different aircraft: an Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation F-CK-1 Ching Kuo multirole Indigenous Defence Fighter, a recently upgraded Lockheed Martin F-16V combat aircraft, a Dassault Mirage 2000-5 fighter, and a Northrop Grumman E-2K airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) platform.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/tecnoveritas-readies-uopv-prototype-for-naval-trials/

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-enduran...

TecnoVeritas readies UOPV prototype for naval trials

by Victor Barreira

Computer-generated imagery of the UOPV being developed by TecnoVeritas. (TecnoVeritas)

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-endurance unmanned surface vehicle (USV) prototype. Testing of Unmanned Oceanic Patrol Vessel (UOPV) is expected to begin in early 2022 with the Portuguese Navy.

The USV is designated the UOPV and features a fibreglass hull supplied by local shipbuilder Nautiber-Estaleiros Navais do Guadiana and is expected to displace 10 tonnes. The hull is equipped with solar panels, a mast, and a superstructure. It measures 8 m long, 2 m wide, with a 1.1 m draught.

The UOPV can carry a two-tonne payload with a total volume of approximately 2.5 m3. It can be equipped with a high-definition electro-optical infrared (EO/IR) system; an ultraviolet camera; an automatic identification system (AIS); a 3D doppler sonar; VHF, 3G and 4G communications; a satellite communications (satcom) terminal; GPS; two navigation computers; a low-power radar; a radar with automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA) capability; an auto-pilot system; a gyro-compass; a weather station; and a wind speed sensor.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Royal Navy sets out its course to ‘podularisation'

by Richard Scott

The UK Royal Navy (RN) is pressing ahead with plans to develop and demonstrate a suite of modular and interchangeable mission containers that are designed to support the rapid deployment of role-based capability around the fleet.

Prototypes of Navy Persistent Operational Deployment System (NavyPODS) are planned to enter test and evaluation in early 2022. The RN foresees deployment of production-standard modules across a range of current and future platforms.

Being led by the navy's Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) organisation, the NavyPODS concept envisages the development of a range of platform-agnostic deployable mission modules, based on ISO-equivalent containers, involving any one of a number of mission payload facilities. Speaking at DSEI 2021 on 15 September, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, Second Sea Lord, said that rather than choosing to design modularity into platforms, the RN was looking to design it out. “Our concept is to simplify the ship [making it] utilitarian, adaptable, common, cheaper,” he said. “Capability will be defined by the modules you add to or remove from that ship based on the operational demand at that time.”


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RoCAF aircraft conduct first emergency landing drill on highway

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

RoCAF F-CK-1 Ching Kuo, F-16V, and Mirage 2000-5 fighter aircraft along with an E-2K aircraft during emergency take-off and landing drills that were conducted from a provincial highway in Taiwan on 15 September during this year's ‘Han Kuang' military exercises. (Military News Agency )

Republic of China Air Force (RoCAF) aircraft have taken part in a take-off and landing exercise in which they used highways as emergency airstrips for the first time.

The drill, which was aimed at testing the ability of RoCAF pilots to operate from narrow and shorter runways, was held on 15 September as part of Taiwan's annual ‘Han Kuang' military drills.

The manoeuvres involved four different aircraft: an Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation F-CK-1 Ching Kuo multirole Indigenous Defence Fighter, a recently upgraded Lockheed Martin F-16V combat aircraft, a Dassault Mirage 2000-5 fighter, and a Northrop Grumman E-2K airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) platform.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/tecnoveritas-readies-uopv-prototype-for-naval-trials/

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-enduran...

TecnoVeritas readies UOPV prototype for naval trials

by Victor Barreira

Computer-generated imagery of the UOPV being developed by TecnoVeritas. (TecnoVeritas)

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-endurance unmanned surface vehicle (USV) prototype. Testing of Unmanned Oceanic Patrol Vessel (UOPV) is expected to begin in early 2022 with the Portuguese Navy.

The USV is designated the UOPV and features a fibreglass hull supplied by local shipbuilder Nautiber-Estaleiros Navais do Guadiana and is expected to displace 10 tonnes. The hull is equipped with solar panels, a mast, and a superstructure. It measures 8 m long, 2 m wide, with a 1.1 m draught.

The UOPV can carry a two-tonne payload with a total volume of approximately 2.5 m3. It can be equipped with a high-definition electro-optical infrared (EO/IR) system; an ultraviolet camera; an automatic identification system (AIS); a 3D doppler sonar; VHF, 3G and 4G communications; a satellite communications (satcom) terminal; GPS; two navigation computers; a low-power radar; a radar with automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA) capability; an auto-pilot system; a gyro-compass; a weather station; and a wind speed sensor.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Royal Navy sets out its course to ‘podularisation'

by Richard Scott

The UK Royal Navy (RN) is pressing ahead with plans to develop and demonstrate a suite of modular and interchangeable mission containers that are designed to support the rapid deployment of role-based capability around the fleet.

Prototypes of Navy Persistent Operational Deployment System (NavyPODS) are planned to enter test and evaluation in early 2022. The RN foresees deployment of production-standard modules across a range of current and future platforms.

Being led by the navy's Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) organisation, the NavyPODS concept envisages the development of a range of platform-agnostic deployable mission modules, based on ISO-equivalent containers, involving any one of a number of mission payload facilities. Speaking at DSEI 2021 on 15 September, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, Second Sea Lord, said that rather than choosing to design modularity into platforms, the RN was looking to design it out. “Our concept is to simplify the ship [making it] utilitarian, adaptable, common, cheaper,” he said. “Capability will be defined by the modules you add to or remove from that ship based on the operational demand at that time.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RoCAF aircraft conduct first emergency landing drill on highway

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

RoCAF F-CK-1 Ching Kuo, F-16V, and Mirage 2000-5 fighter aircraft along with an E-2K aircraft during emergency take-off and landing drills that were conducted from a provincial highway in Taiwan on 15 September during this year's ‘Han Kuang' military exercises. (Military News Agency )

Republic of China Air Force (RoCAF) aircraft have taken part in a take-off and landing exercise in which they used highways as emergency airstrips for the first time.

The drill, which was aimed at testing the ability of RoCAF pilots to operate from narrow and shorter runways, was held on 15 September as part of Taiwan's annual ‘Han Kuang' military drills.

The manoeuvres involved four different aircraft: an Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation F-CK-1 Ching Kuo multirole Indigenous Defence Fighter, a recently upgraded Lockheed Martin F-16V combat aircraft, a Dassault Mirage 2000-5 fighter, and a Northrop Grumman E-2K airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) platform.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/tecnoveritas-readies-uopv-prototype-for-naval-trials/

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-enduran...

TecnoVeritas readies UOPV prototype for naval trials

by Victor Barreira

Computer-generated imagery of the UOPV being developed by TecnoVeritas. (TecnoVeritas)

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-endurance unmanned surface vehicle (USV) prototype. Testing of Unmanned Oceanic Patrol Vessel (UOPV) is expected to begin in early 2022 with the Portuguese Navy.

The USV is designated the UOPV and features a fibreglass hull supplied by local shipbuilder Nautiber-Estaleiros Navais do Guadiana and is expected to displace 10 tonnes. The hull is equipped with solar panels, a mast, and a superstructure. It measures 8 m long, 2 m wide, with a 1.1 m draught.

The UOPV can carry a two-tonne payload with a total volume of approximately 2.5 m3. It can be equipped with a high-definition electro-optical infrared (EO/IR) system; an ultraviolet camera; an automatic identification system (AIS); a 3D doppler sonar; VHF, 3G and 4G communications; a satellite communications (satcom) terminal; GPS; two navigation computers; a low-power radar; a radar with automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA) capability; an auto-pilot system; a gyro-compass; a weather station; and a wind speed sensor.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Royal Navy sets out its course to ‘podularisation'

by Richard Scott

The UK Royal Navy (RN) is pressing ahead with plans to develop and demonstrate a suite of modular and interchangeable mission containers that are designed to support the rapid deployment of role-based capability around the fleet.

Prototypes of Navy Persistent Operational Deployment System (NavyPODS) are planned to enter test and evaluation in early 2022. The RN foresees deployment of production-standard modules across a range of current and future platforms.

Being led by the navy's Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) organisation, the NavyPODS concept envisages the development of a range of platform-agnostic deployable mission modules, based on ISO-equivalent containers, involving any one of a number of mission payload facilities. Speaking at DSEI 2021 on 15 September, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, Second Sea Lord, said that rather than choosing to design modularity into platforms, the RN was looking to design it out. “Our concept is to simplify the ship [making it] utilitarian, adaptable, common, cheaper,” he said. “Capability will be defined by the modules you add to or remove from that ship based on the operational demand at that time.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RoCAF aircraft conduct first emergency landing drill on highway

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

RoCAF F-CK-1 Ching Kuo, F-16V, and Mirage 2000-5 fighter aircraft along with an E-2K aircraft during emergency take-off and landing drills that were conducted from a provincial highway in Taiwan on 15 September during this year's ‘Han Kuang' military exercises. (Military News Agency )

Republic of China Air Force (RoCAF) aircraft have taken part in a take-off and landing exercise in which they used highways as emergency airstrips for the first time.

The drill, which was aimed at testing the ability of RoCAF pilots to operate from narrow and shorter runways, was held on 15 September as part of Taiwan's annual ‘Han Kuang' military drills.

The manoeuvres involved four different aircraft: an Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation F-CK-1 Ching Kuo multirole Indigenous Defence Fighter, a recently upgraded Lockheed Martin F-16V combat aircraft, a Dassault Mirage 2000-5 fighter, and a Northrop Grumman E-2K airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) platform.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/tecnoveritas-readies-uopv-prototype-for-naval-trials/

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-enduran...

TecnoVeritas readies UOPV prototype for naval trials

by Victor Barreira

Computer-generated imagery of the UOPV being developed by TecnoVeritas. (TecnoVeritas)

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-endurance unmanned surface vehicle (USV) prototype. Testing of Unmanned Oceanic Patrol Vessel (UOPV) is expected to begin in early 2022 with the Portuguese Navy.

The USV is designated the UOPV and features a fibreglass hull supplied by local shipbuilder Nautiber-Estaleiros Navais do Guadiana and is expected to displace 10 tonnes. The hull is equipped with solar panels, a mast, and a superstructure. It measures 8 m long, 2 m wide, with a 1.1 m draught.

The UOPV can carry a two-tonne payload with a total volume of approximately 2.5 m3. It can be equipped with a high-definition electro-optical infrared (EO/IR) system; an ultraviolet camera; an automatic identification system (AIS); a 3D doppler sonar; VHF, 3G and 4G communications; a satellite communications (satcom) terminal; GPS; two navigation computers; a low-power radar; a radar with automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA) capability; an auto-pilot system; a gyro-compass; a weather station; and a wind speed sensor.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: Royal Navy sets out its course to ‘podularisation'

by Richard Scott

The UK Royal Navy (RN) is pressing ahead with plans to develop and demonstrate a suite of modular and interchangeable mission containers that are designed to support the rapid deployment of role-based capability around the fleet.

Prototypes of Navy Persistent Operational Deployment System (NavyPODS) are planned to enter test and evaluation in early 2022. The RN foresees deployment of production-standard modules across a range of current and future platforms.

Being led by the navy's Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) organisation, the NavyPODS concept envisages the development of a range of platform-agnostic deployable mission modules, based on ISO-equivalent containers, involving any one of a number of mission payload facilities. Speaking at DSEI 2021 on 15 September, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, Second Sea Lord, said that rather than choosing to design modularity into platforms, the RN was looking to design it out. “Our concept is to simplify the ship [making it] utilitarian, adaptable, common, cheaper,” he said. “Capability will be defined by the modules you add to or remove from that ship based on the operational demand at that time.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


RoCAF aircraft conduct first emergency landing drill on highway

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

RoCAF F-CK-1 Ching Kuo, F-16V, and Mirage 2000-5 fighter aircraft along with an E-2K aircraft during emergency take-off and landing drills that were conducted from a provincial highway in Taiwan on 15 September during this year's ‘Han Kuang' military exercises. (Military News Agency )

Republic of China Air Force (RoCAF) aircraft have taken part in a take-off and landing exercise in which they used highways as emergency airstrips for the first time.

The drill, which was aimed at testing the ability of RoCAF pilots to operate from narrow and shorter runways, was held on 15 September as part of Taiwan's annual ‘Han Kuang' military drills.

The manoeuvres involved four different aircraft: an Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation F-CK-1 Ching Kuo multirole Indigenous Defence Fighter, a recently upgraded Lockheed Martin F-16V combat aircraft, a Dassault Mirage 2000-5 fighter, and a Northrop Grumman E-2K airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) platform.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/tecnoveritas-readies-uopv-prototype-for-naval-trials/

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-enduran...

TecnoVeritas readies UOPV prototype for naval trials

by Victor Barreira

Computer-generated imagery of the UOPV being developed by TecnoVeritas. (TecnoVeritas)

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-endurance unmanned surface vehicle (USV) prototype. Testing of Unmanned Oceanic Patrol Vessel (UOPV) is expected to begin in early 2022 with the Portuguese Navy.

The USV is designated the UOPV and features a fibreglass hull supplied by local shipbuilder Nautiber-Estaleiros Navais do Guadiana and is expected to displace 10 tonnes. The hull is equipped with solar panels, a mast, and a superstructure. It measures 8 m long, 2 m wide, with a 1.1 m draught.

The UOPV can carry a two-tonne payload with a total volume of approximately 2.5 m3. It can be equipped with a high-definition electro-optical infrared (EO/IR) system; an ultraviolet camera; an automatic identification system (AIS); a 3D doppler sonar; VHF, 3G and 4G communications; a satellite communications (satcom) terminal; GPS; two navigation computers; a low-power radar; a radar with automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA) capability; an auto-pilot system; a gyro-compass; a weather station; and a wind speed sensor.


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North Korea says it tested ‘railway-borne' missile system on 15 September

by Gabriel Dominguez & Mark Cazalet

An image released by North Korean state media showing what appears to be a modified KN-23 SRBM being launched from railway-borne launch system on 15 September. (Rodong Sinmun)

Images released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) indicate that Pyongyang test-launched on 15 September what appears to have been a modified variant of the KN-23 (US/South Korean designation) short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) from a railway-based launch system.

The state-run media outlet reported that the weapons were launched as part of a launch drill carried out by a “railway-borne missile regiment” that was set up earlier this year to bolster the country's capability to “deal simultaneous blows to threat-posing forces” in case of a conflict.

The aim of the drill was to “confirm the practicality” of the railway-based launch system, which was tested for the first time, as well as to assess the combat readiness and performance of the new regiment, noted the KCNA, adding that the exercise saw the SRBMs “accurately strike” their intended target area some 800 km away in the East Sea (also known as the Sea of Japan). The move marked the northeast Asian country's first ballistic missile launches in about six months.


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DSEI 2021: Royal Navy sets out its course to ‘podularisation'

by Richard Scott

The UK Royal Navy (RN) is pressing ahead with plans to develop and demonstrate a suite of modular and interchangeable mission containers that are designed to support the rapid deployment of role-based capability around the fleet.

Prototypes of Navy Persistent Operational Deployment System (NavyPODS) are planned to enter test and evaluation in early 2022. The RN foresees deployment of production-standard modules across a range of current and future platforms.

Being led by the navy's Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) organisation, the NavyPODS concept envisages the development of a range of platform-agnostic deployable mission modules, based on ISO-equivalent containers, involving any one of a number of mission payload facilities. Speaking at DSEI 2021 on 15 September, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, Second Sea Lord, said that rather than choosing to design modularity into platforms, the RN was looking to design it out. “Our concept is to simplify the ship [making it] utilitarian, adaptable, common, cheaper,” he said. “Capability will be defined by the modules you add to or remove from that ship based on the operational demand at that time.”


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RoCAF aircraft conduct first emergency landing drill on highway

by Alessandra Giovanzanti

RoCAF F-CK-1 Ching Kuo, F-16V, and Mirage 2000-5 fighter aircraft along with an E-2K aircraft during emergency take-off and landing drills that were conducted from a provincial highway in Taiwan on 15 September during this year's ‘Han Kuang' military exercises. (Military News Agency )

Republic of China Air Force (RoCAF) aircraft have taken part in a take-off and landing exercise in which they used highways as emergency airstrips for the first time.

The drill, which was aimed at testing the ability of RoCAF pilots to operate from narrow and shorter runways, was held on 15 September as part of Taiwan's annual ‘Han Kuang' military drills.

The manoeuvres involved four different aircraft: an Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation F-CK-1 Ching Kuo multirole Indigenous Defence Fighter, a recently upgraded Lockheed Martin F-16V combat aircraft, a Dassault Mirage 2000-5 fighter, and a Northrop Grumman E-2K airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) platform.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/tecnoveritas-readies-uopv-prototype-for-naval-trials/

Portuguese engineering firm TecnoVeritas is finalising the production of a multipurpose long-enduran...

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