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South Korea testing several new missiles amid tensions with Pyongyang

by Mark Cazalet & Alessandra Giovanzanti & Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

An infra-red image showing South Korea's new long-range air-to-surface missile in flight. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has been developing and testing a range of new missiles, including a ground-launched supersonic cruise missile, a ground-launched ballistic missile, a long-range air-to-surface missile, and a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM).

The MND said in a statement that the new long-range air-launched missile recently underwent an aircraft separation test, with ADD footage of the test showing the weapon being launched from a Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-4E Phantom II aircraft. The missile has been slated for use by Korea Aerospace Industries' (KAI's) KF-21 Boramae low-observable fighter aircraft, which is being developed for the RoKAF. According to the MND, the new indigenous missile is currently in the research and development stage and the recent flight test verified its ability to successfully strike a target after being launched from the aircraft.

The new air-launched missile, which bears a resemblance to the Taurus KEPD 350K cruise missile in RoKAF service but appears to lack an air-breathing engine, falls within South Korean plans to develop indigenous weapon systems for the KF-21, including a new supersonic air-launched anti-ship missile (ASM), a new long-range ASM, and hypersonic missiles.

These weapon system developments are consistent with the block upgrade path envisioned by KAI to improve fighter's performance over time. After completion of four years of flight tests (about 2,200 sorties), mass production of the KF-21 is expected to start in 2026 with the ‘Block 1' aircraft, which will be equipped with limited air-to-ground weapons in addition to air-to-air weapons. From 2028 the ‘Block 2' aircraft will be capable of performing full air-to-air and air-to-ground combat missions.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-testing-several-new-missiles-amid-tensions-with-pyongyang/

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defen...

South Korea testing several new missiles amid tensions with Pyongyang

by Mark Cazalet & Alessandra Giovanzanti & Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

An infra-red image showing South Korea's new long-range air-to-surface missile in flight. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has been developing and testing a range of new missiles, including a ground-launched supersonic cruise missile, a ground-launched ballistic missile, a long-range air-to-surface missile, and a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM).

The MND said in a statement that the new long-range air-launched missile recently underwent an aircraft separation test, with ADD footage of the test showing the weapon being launched from a Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-4E Phantom II aircraft. The missile has been slated for use by Korea Aerospace Industries' (KAI's) KF-21 Boramae low-observable fighter aircraft, which is being developed for the RoKAF. According to the MND, the new indigenous missile is currently in the research and development stage and the recent flight test verified its ability to successfully strike a target after being launched from the aircraft.


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MDA demonstrates selectable stage booster for GBI

by Robin Hughes

A long-range Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) is launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on 12 September. This was the first flight test of a GBI three-stage booster operating in two-stage mode. (Missile Defense Agency)

The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), in association with Boeing and Raytheon Technologies, on 12 September conducted a test launch of a Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI), flying a mock-up of the Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV), with a three-stage booster operating in a two-stage mode.

The milestone test – in which the third stage was not ignited – demonstrates a new capability for the GBI, allowing it to release the EKV earlier in flight and, accordingly, enable an earlier opportunity to intercept and defeat a missile threat. The MDA designates this new capability as “a 2-/3-Stage selectable GBI”.


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DSEI 2021: British Army unveils GBAD programme map

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of ground-based air-defence (GBAD) capabilities is being procured by the British Army to protect its manoeuvre forces from air attack, precision-guided weapons, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and artillery and rocket fire.

Brigadier Jon Swift, the service's head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI exhibition in London on 14 September that the Land GBAD programme was fully funded and has been given a high priority by the British Army and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD).

The programme envisages the modernisation of existing in-service systems and the fielding of new capabilities, including effectors (missiles and weapons) and sensors, over the next decade. It is understood to be classed as a Category A programme, involving a budget of more than GBP400 million (USD554 million), although Brig Swift did not provide any specifics of the programme budget or detailed fielding timelines.

During his briefing Brig Swift confirmed that the MBDA Sky Sabre medium-range air-defence (MRAD) system would be deployed to the Falklands by the end of this month, adding that this would also coincide with a declaration of its initial operating capability (IOC).


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DSEI 2021: British Army aims for deep fires portfolio

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of new surface-to-surface deep fires weapons is to be procured for the British Army to transform its capability to take on and defeat peer-level opponents.

Brigadier John Swift, the British Army's Head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September that fielding the new weapons would be central to the service's “pivot to the deep”.

The new weapons would allow the British Army to strike deep into enemy's rear areas and increase the survivability of the service's own deep strike weapons, he said. This would enable close manoeuvre operations.

At the heart of the new Land Deep Fires programme would be the concept of “one launcher, one payload”, which Swift said would be based around the upgraded Lockheed Martin M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS).

The British Army launched a programme to upgrade 44 M270s earlier this year and committed to procuring the US-developed Guided MLRS Extended Range (GMLRS-ER) missile and Precision Strike Missile (PrSM).


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-testing-several-new-missiles-amid-tensions-with-pyongyang/

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defen...

South Korea testing several new missiles amid tensions with Pyongyang

by Mark Cazalet & Alessandra Giovanzanti & Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

An infra-red image showing South Korea's new long-range air-to-surface missile in flight. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has been developing and testing a range of new missiles, including a ground-launched supersonic cruise missile, a ground-launched ballistic missile, a long-range air-to-surface missile, and a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM).

The MND said in a statement that the new long-range air-launched missile recently underwent an aircraft separation test, with ADD footage of the test showing the weapon being launched from a Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-4E Phantom II aircraft. The missile has been slated for use by Korea Aerospace Industries' (KAI's) KF-21 Boramae low-observable fighter aircraft, which is being developed for the RoKAF. According to the MND, the new indigenous missile is currently in the research and development stage and the recent flight test verified its ability to successfully strike a target after being launched from the aircraft.


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MDA demonstrates selectable stage booster for GBI

by Robin Hughes

A long-range Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) is launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on 12 September. This was the first flight test of a GBI three-stage booster operating in two-stage mode. (Missile Defense Agency)

The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), in association with Boeing and Raytheon Technologies, on 12 September conducted a test launch of a Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI), flying a mock-up of the Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV), with a three-stage booster operating in a two-stage mode.

The milestone test – in which the third stage was not ignited – demonstrates a new capability for the GBI, allowing it to release the EKV earlier in flight and, accordingly, enable an earlier opportunity to intercept and defeat a missile threat. The MDA designates this new capability as “a 2-/3-Stage selectable GBI”.


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DSEI 2021: British Army unveils GBAD programme map

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of ground-based air-defence (GBAD) capabilities is being procured by the British Army to protect its manoeuvre forces from air attack, precision-guided weapons, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and artillery and rocket fire.

Brigadier Jon Swift, the service's head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI exhibition in London on 14 September that the Land GBAD programme was fully funded and has been given a high priority by the British Army and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD).

The programme envisages the modernisation of existing in-service systems and the fielding of new capabilities, including effectors (missiles and weapons) and sensors, over the next decade. It is understood to be classed as a Category A programme, involving a budget of more than GBP400 million (USD554 million), although Brig Swift did not provide any specifics of the programme budget or detailed fielding timelines.

During his briefing Brig Swift confirmed that the MBDA Sky Sabre medium-range air-defence (MRAD) system would be deployed to the Falklands by the end of this month, adding that this would also coincide with a declaration of its initial operating capability (IOC).


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DSEI 2021: British Army aims for deep fires portfolio

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of new surface-to-surface deep fires weapons is to be procured for the British Army to transform its capability to take on and defeat peer-level opponents.

Brigadier John Swift, the British Army's Head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September that fielding the new weapons would be central to the service's “pivot to the deep”.

The new weapons would allow the British Army to strike deep into enemy's rear areas and increase the survivability of the service's own deep strike weapons, he said. This would enable close manoeuvre operations.

At the heart of the new Land Deep Fires programme would be the concept of “one launcher, one payload”, which Swift said would be based around the upgraded Lockheed Martin M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS).

The British Army launched a programme to upgrade 44 M270s earlier this year and committed to procuring the US-developed Guided MLRS Extended Range (GMLRS-ER) missile and Precision Strike Missile (PrSM).


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-testing-several-new-missiles-amid-tensions-with-pyongyang/

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defen...

South Korea testing several new missiles amid tensions with Pyongyang

by Mark Cazalet & Alessandra Giovanzanti & Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

An infra-red image showing South Korea's new long-range air-to-surface missile in flight. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has been developing and testing a range of new missiles, including a ground-launched supersonic cruise missile, a ground-launched ballistic missile, a long-range air-to-surface missile, and a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM).

The MND said in a statement that the new long-range air-launched missile recently underwent an aircraft separation test, with ADD footage of the test showing the weapon being launched from a Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-4E Phantom II aircraft. The missile has been slated for use by Korea Aerospace Industries' (KAI's) KF-21 Boramae low-observable fighter aircraft, which is being developed for the RoKAF. According to the MND, the new indigenous missile is currently in the research and development stage and the recent flight test verified its ability to successfully strike a target after being launched from the aircraft.


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MDA demonstrates selectable stage booster for GBI

by Robin Hughes

A long-range Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) is launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on 12 September. This was the first flight test of a GBI three-stage booster operating in two-stage mode. (Missile Defense Agency)

The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), in association with Boeing and Raytheon Technologies, on 12 September conducted a test launch of a Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI), flying a mock-up of the Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV), with a three-stage booster operating in a two-stage mode.

The milestone test – in which the third stage was not ignited – demonstrates a new capability for the GBI, allowing it to release the EKV earlier in flight and, accordingly, enable an earlier opportunity to intercept and defeat a missile threat. The MDA designates this new capability as “a 2-/3-Stage selectable GBI”.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: British Army unveils GBAD programme map

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of ground-based air-defence (GBAD) capabilities is being procured by the British Army to protect its manoeuvre forces from air attack, precision-guided weapons, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and artillery and rocket fire.

Brigadier Jon Swift, the service's head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI exhibition in London on 14 September that the Land GBAD programme was fully funded and has been given a high priority by the British Army and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD).

The programme envisages the modernisation of existing in-service systems and the fielding of new capabilities, including effectors (missiles and weapons) and sensors, over the next decade. It is understood to be classed as a Category A programme, involving a budget of more than GBP400 million (USD554 million), although Brig Swift did not provide any specifics of the programme budget or detailed fielding timelines.

During his briefing Brig Swift confirmed that the MBDA Sky Sabre medium-range air-defence (MRAD) system would be deployed to the Falklands by the end of this month, adding that this would also coincide with a declaration of its initial operating capability (IOC).


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: British Army aims for deep fires portfolio

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of new surface-to-surface deep fires weapons is to be procured for the British Army to transform its capability to take on and defeat peer-level opponents.

Brigadier John Swift, the British Army's Head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September that fielding the new weapons would be central to the service's “pivot to the deep”.

The new weapons would allow the British Army to strike deep into enemy's rear areas and increase the survivability of the service's own deep strike weapons, he said. This would enable close manoeuvre operations.

At the heart of the new Land Deep Fires programme would be the concept of “one launcher, one payload”, which Swift said would be based around the upgraded Lockheed Martin M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS).

The British Army launched a programme to upgrade 44 M270s earlier this year and committed to procuring the US-developed Guided MLRS Extended Range (GMLRS-ER) missile and Precision Strike Missile (PrSM).


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-testing-several-new-missiles-amid-tensions-with-pyongyang/

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defen...

South Korea testing several new missiles amid tensions with Pyongyang

by Mark Cazalet & Alessandra Giovanzanti & Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

An infra-red image showing South Korea's new long-range air-to-surface missile in flight. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has been developing and testing a range of new missiles, including a ground-launched supersonic cruise missile, a ground-launched ballistic missile, a long-range air-to-surface missile, and a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM).

The MND said in a statement that the new long-range air-launched missile recently underwent an aircraft separation test, with ADD footage of the test showing the weapon being launched from a Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-4E Phantom II aircraft. The missile has been slated for use by Korea Aerospace Industries' (KAI's) KF-21 Boramae low-observable fighter aircraft, which is being developed for the RoKAF. According to the MND, the new indigenous missile is currently in the research and development stage and the recent flight test verified its ability to successfully strike a target after being launched from the aircraft.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


MDA demonstrates selectable stage booster for GBI

by Robin Hughes

A long-range Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) is launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on 12 September. This was the first flight test of a GBI three-stage booster operating in two-stage mode. (Missile Defense Agency)

The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), in association with Boeing and Raytheon Technologies, on 12 September conducted a test launch of a Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI), flying a mock-up of the Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV), with a three-stage booster operating in a two-stage mode.

The milestone test – in which the third stage was not ignited – demonstrates a new capability for the GBI, allowing it to release the EKV earlier in flight and, accordingly, enable an earlier opportunity to intercept and defeat a missile threat. The MDA designates this new capability as “a 2-/3-Stage selectable GBI”.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: British Army unveils GBAD programme map

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of ground-based air-defence (GBAD) capabilities is being procured by the British Army to protect its manoeuvre forces from air attack, precision-guided weapons, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and artillery and rocket fire.

Brigadier Jon Swift, the service's head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI exhibition in London on 14 September that the Land GBAD programme was fully funded and has been given a high priority by the British Army and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD).

The programme envisages the modernisation of existing in-service systems and the fielding of new capabilities, including effectors (missiles and weapons) and sensors, over the next decade. It is understood to be classed as a Category A programme, involving a budget of more than GBP400 million (USD554 million), although Brig Swift did not provide any specifics of the programme budget or detailed fielding timelines.

During his briefing Brig Swift confirmed that the MBDA Sky Sabre medium-range air-defence (MRAD) system would be deployed to the Falklands by the end of this month, adding that this would also coincide with a declaration of its initial operating capability (IOC).


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: British Army aims for deep fires portfolio

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of new surface-to-surface deep fires weapons is to be procured for the British Army to transform its capability to take on and defeat peer-level opponents.

Brigadier John Swift, the British Army's Head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September that fielding the new weapons would be central to the service's “pivot to the deep”.

The new weapons would allow the British Army to strike deep into enemy's rear areas and increase the survivability of the service's own deep strike weapons, he said. This would enable close manoeuvre operations.

At the heart of the new Land Deep Fires programme would be the concept of “one launcher, one payload”, which Swift said would be based around the upgraded Lockheed Martin M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS).

The British Army launched a programme to upgrade 44 M270s earlier this year and committed to procuring the US-developed Guided MLRS Extended Range (GMLRS-ER) missile and Precision Strike Missile (PrSM).


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-testing-several-new-missiles-amid-tensions-with-pyongyang/

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defen...

South Korea testing several new missiles amid tensions with Pyongyang

by Mark Cazalet & Alessandra Giovanzanti & Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

An infra-red image showing South Korea's new long-range air-to-surface missile in flight. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has been developing and testing a range of new missiles, including a ground-launched supersonic cruise missile, a ground-launched ballistic missile, a long-range air-to-surface missile, and a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM).

The MND said in a statement that the new long-range air-launched missile recently underwent an aircraft separation test, with ADD footage of the test showing the weapon being launched from a Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-4E Phantom II aircraft. The missile has been slated for use by Korea Aerospace Industries' (KAI's) KF-21 Boramae low-observable fighter aircraft, which is being developed for the RoKAF. According to the MND, the new indigenous missile is currently in the research and development stage and the recent flight test verified its ability to successfully strike a target after being launched from the aircraft.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


MDA demonstrates selectable stage booster for GBI

by Robin Hughes

A long-range Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) is launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on 12 September. This was the first flight test of a GBI three-stage booster operating in two-stage mode. (Missile Defense Agency)

The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), in association with Boeing and Raytheon Technologies, on 12 September conducted a test launch of a Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI), flying a mock-up of the Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV), with a three-stage booster operating in a two-stage mode.

The milestone test – in which the third stage was not ignited – demonstrates a new capability for the GBI, allowing it to release the EKV earlier in flight and, accordingly, enable an earlier opportunity to intercept and defeat a missile threat. The MDA designates this new capability as “a 2-/3-Stage selectable GBI”.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: British Army unveils GBAD programme map

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of ground-based air-defence (GBAD) capabilities is being procured by the British Army to protect its manoeuvre forces from air attack, precision-guided weapons, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and artillery and rocket fire.

Brigadier Jon Swift, the service's head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI exhibition in London on 14 September that the Land GBAD programme was fully funded and has been given a high priority by the British Army and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD).

The programme envisages the modernisation of existing in-service systems and the fielding of new capabilities, including effectors (missiles and weapons) and sensors, over the next decade. It is understood to be classed as a Category A programme, involving a budget of more than GBP400 million (USD554 million), although Brig Swift did not provide any specifics of the programme budget or detailed fielding timelines.

During his briefing Brig Swift confirmed that the MBDA Sky Sabre medium-range air-defence (MRAD) system would be deployed to the Falklands by the end of this month, adding that this would also coincide with a declaration of its initial operating capability (IOC).


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: British Army aims for deep fires portfolio

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of new surface-to-surface deep fires weapons is to be procured for the British Army to transform its capability to take on and defeat peer-level opponents.

Brigadier John Swift, the British Army's Head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September that fielding the new weapons would be central to the service's “pivot to the deep”.

The new weapons would allow the British Army to strike deep into enemy's rear areas and increase the survivability of the service's own deep strike weapons, he said. This would enable close manoeuvre operations.

At the heart of the new Land Deep Fires programme would be the concept of “one launcher, one payload”, which Swift said would be based around the upgraded Lockheed Martin M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS).

The British Army launched a programme to upgrade 44 M270s earlier this year and committed to procuring the US-developed Guided MLRS Extended Range (GMLRS-ER) missile and Precision Strike Missile (PrSM).


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-testing-several-new-missiles-amid-tensions-with-pyongyang/

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defen...

South Korea testing several new missiles amid tensions with Pyongyang

by Mark Cazalet & Alessandra Giovanzanti & Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

An infra-red image showing South Korea's new long-range air-to-surface missile in flight. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has been developing and testing a range of new missiles, including a ground-launched supersonic cruise missile, a ground-launched ballistic missile, a long-range air-to-surface missile, and a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM).

The MND said in a statement that the new long-range air-launched missile recently underwent an aircraft separation test, with ADD footage of the test showing the weapon being launched from a Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-4E Phantom II aircraft. The missile has been slated for use by Korea Aerospace Industries' (KAI's) KF-21 Boramae low-observable fighter aircraft, which is being developed for the RoKAF. According to the MND, the new indigenous missile is currently in the research and development stage and the recent flight test verified its ability to successfully strike a target after being launched from the aircraft.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


MDA demonstrates selectable stage booster for GBI

by Robin Hughes

A long-range Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) is launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on 12 September. This was the first flight test of a GBI three-stage booster operating in two-stage mode. (Missile Defense Agency)

The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), in association with Boeing and Raytheon Technologies, on 12 September conducted a test launch of a Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI), flying a mock-up of the Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV), with a three-stage booster operating in a two-stage mode.

The milestone test – in which the third stage was not ignited – demonstrates a new capability for the GBI, allowing it to release the EKV earlier in flight and, accordingly, enable an earlier opportunity to intercept and defeat a missile threat. The MDA designates this new capability as “a 2-/3-Stage selectable GBI”.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: British Army unveils GBAD programme map

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of ground-based air-defence (GBAD) capabilities is being procured by the British Army to protect its manoeuvre forces from air attack, precision-guided weapons, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and artillery and rocket fire.

Brigadier Jon Swift, the service's head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI exhibition in London on 14 September that the Land GBAD programme was fully funded and has been given a high priority by the British Army and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD).

The programme envisages the modernisation of existing in-service systems and the fielding of new capabilities, including effectors (missiles and weapons) and sensors, over the next decade. It is understood to be classed as a Category A programme, involving a budget of more than GBP400 million (USD554 million), although Brig Swift did not provide any specifics of the programme budget or detailed fielding timelines.

During his briefing Brig Swift confirmed that the MBDA Sky Sabre medium-range air-defence (MRAD) system would be deployed to the Falklands by the end of this month, adding that this would also coincide with a declaration of its initial operating capability (IOC).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: British Army aims for deep fires portfolio

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of new surface-to-surface deep fires weapons is to be procured for the British Army to transform its capability to take on and defeat peer-level opponents.

Brigadier John Swift, the British Army's Head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September that fielding the new weapons would be central to the service's “pivot to the deep”.

The new weapons would allow the British Army to strike deep into enemy's rear areas and increase the survivability of the service's own deep strike weapons, he said. This would enable close manoeuvre operations.

At the heart of the new Land Deep Fires programme would be the concept of “one launcher, one payload”, which Swift said would be based around the upgraded Lockheed Martin M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS).

The British Army launched a programme to upgrade 44 M270s earlier this year and committed to procuring the US-developed Guided MLRS Extended Range (GMLRS-ER) missile and Precision Strike Missile (PrSM).


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-testing-several-new-missiles-amid-tensions-with-pyongyang/

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defen...

South Korea testing several new missiles amid tensions with Pyongyang

by Mark Cazalet & Alessandra Giovanzanti & Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

An infra-red image showing South Korea's new long-range air-to-surface missile in flight. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has been developing and testing a range of new missiles, including a ground-launched supersonic cruise missile, a ground-launched ballistic missile, a long-range air-to-surface missile, and a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM).

The MND said in a statement that the new long-range air-launched missile recently underwent an aircraft separation test, with ADD footage of the test showing the weapon being launched from a Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-4E Phantom II aircraft. The missile has been slated for use by Korea Aerospace Industries' (KAI's) KF-21 Boramae low-observable fighter aircraft, which is being developed for the RoKAF. According to the MND, the new indigenous missile is currently in the research and development stage and the recent flight test verified its ability to successfully strike a target after being launched from the aircraft.


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MDA demonstrates selectable stage booster for GBI

by Robin Hughes

A long-range Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) is launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on 12 September. This was the first flight test of a GBI three-stage booster operating in two-stage mode. (Missile Defense Agency)

The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), in association with Boeing and Raytheon Technologies, on 12 September conducted a test launch of a Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI), flying a mock-up of the Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV), with a three-stage booster operating in a two-stage mode.

The milestone test – in which the third stage was not ignited – demonstrates a new capability for the GBI, allowing it to release the EKV earlier in flight and, accordingly, enable an earlier opportunity to intercept and defeat a missile threat. The MDA designates this new capability as “a 2-/3-Stage selectable GBI”.


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DSEI 2021: British Army unveils GBAD programme map

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of ground-based air-defence (GBAD) capabilities is being procured by the British Army to protect its manoeuvre forces from air attack, precision-guided weapons, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and artillery and rocket fire.

Brigadier Jon Swift, the service's head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI exhibition in London on 14 September that the Land GBAD programme was fully funded and has been given a high priority by the British Army and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD).

The programme envisages the modernisation of existing in-service systems and the fielding of new capabilities, including effectors (missiles and weapons) and sensors, over the next decade. It is understood to be classed as a Category A programme, involving a budget of more than GBP400 million (USD554 million), although Brig Swift did not provide any specifics of the programme budget or detailed fielding timelines.

During his briefing Brig Swift confirmed that the MBDA Sky Sabre medium-range air-defence (MRAD) system would be deployed to the Falklands by the end of this month, adding that this would also coincide with a declaration of its initial operating capability (IOC).


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DSEI 2021: British Army aims for deep fires portfolio

by Tim Ripley

A portfolio of new surface-to-surface deep fires weapons is to be procured for the British Army to transform its capability to take on and defeat peer-level opponents.

Brigadier John Swift, the British Army's Head of Ground Manoeuvre Capability, told an audience at the DSEI defence exhibition in London on 14 September that fielding the new weapons would be central to the service's “pivot to the deep”.

The new weapons would allow the British Army to strike deep into enemy's rear areas and increase the survivability of the service's own deep strike weapons, he said. This would enable close manoeuvre operations.

At the heart of the new Land Deep Fires programme would be the concept of “one launcher, one payload”, which Swift said would be based around the upgraded Lockheed Martin M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS).

The British Army launched a programme to upgrade 44 M270s earlier this year and committed to procuring the US-developed Guided MLRS Extended Range (GMLRS-ER) missile and Precision Strike Missile (PrSM).


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-testing-several-new-missiles-amid-tensions-with-pyongyang/

South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) announced on 15 September that its Agency for Defen...

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