Janes - News page

South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.

The Yonhap News Agency quoted unnamed military sources as saying on 7 September that series-production of the SLBM, which has reportedly been codenamed ‘Hyeonmu 4-4' (also spelled ‘Hyunmoo 4-4'), would begin once a series of additional tests had been completed.

Yonhap also reported that the SLBM is believed to be a variant of South Korea's 500 km-range Hyeonmu-2B (also spelled Hyunmoo-2B) ballistic missile and would be fitted with a conventional warhead.

The Republic of Korea Navy (RoKN) commissioned Dosan An Chang-ho

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-conducts-first-slbm-test-launch-from-in-service-submarine/

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from a...

South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Royal Malaysian Navy receives third Keris-class Littoral Mission Ship

by Gabriel Dominguez

The Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) has received the third of four Keris-class Littoral Mission Ships (LMSs) ordered from China as part of a contract awarded in 2017 and renegotiated in 2019.

The 68.8 m-long vessel (pennant number 113), construction of which began in September 2019, was launched by China's Wuchang Shipbuilding Industry Group in Wuhan on 28 October 2020 and is expected to be inducted into the RMN in the coming weeks.

Before the handover, the ship, which apparently has yet to be named, underwent a series of port acceptance tests and sea trials. Once inducted into service the vessel will be part of the 11th LMS Squadron, which will be home-ported at Sepanggar naval base at Kota Kinabalu in the state of Sabah in the Malaysian part of the island of Borneo. Sepanggar also serves as the headquarters for the RMN's Eastern Fleet.

The vessel will then join first-of-class KD Keris (111), which was commissioned in January 2020, and second-of-class KD Sundang (112), which entered service on 5 March of this year.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DroneShield takes aim at emerging C-UUV and diver detection requirements with SonarOne

by Gerrard Cowan

DroneShield has expanded its range of C-UAS products with the SonarOne system, its first underwater detection device. (DroneShield)

DroneShield's new SonarOne underwater threat detection system is designed to provide an easily operated sonar product that can detect multiple targets simultaneously, with the developer responding to growing naval demands for counter-unmanned underwater vehicle (C-UUV) and diver detection technology, the company told Janes.

SonarOne was announced in early September and is part of the company's DroneSentry autonomous fixed suite of sensors and countermeasures, which also incorporates radar and company technology like DroneOpt cameras and RfOne RF detectors. The sonar and other DroneSentry sensors can also be used with the company's DroneOptIde AI-driven computer vision technology.

SonarOne can be deployed underwater as part of a DroneSentry suite at a port or a harbour as a node within a multisensory suite. It can also be used as a standalone system and can be deployed from ships as well as fixed sites.

The new product is the first sonar device developed by DroneShield, which has until now largely focused on threats like unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and electronic warfare (EW).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-conducts-first-slbm-test-launch-from-in-service-submarine/

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from a...

South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Royal Malaysian Navy receives third Keris-class Littoral Mission Ship

by Gabriel Dominguez

The Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) has received the third of four Keris-class Littoral Mission Ships (LMSs) ordered from China as part of a contract awarded in 2017 and renegotiated in 2019.

The 68.8 m-long vessel (pennant number 113), construction of which began in September 2019, was launched by China's Wuchang Shipbuilding Industry Group in Wuhan on 28 October 2020 and is expected to be inducted into the RMN in the coming weeks.

Before the handover, the ship, which apparently has yet to be named, underwent a series of port acceptance tests and sea trials. Once inducted into service the vessel will be part of the 11th LMS Squadron, which will be home-ported at Sepanggar naval base at Kota Kinabalu in the state of Sabah in the Malaysian part of the island of Borneo. Sepanggar also serves as the headquarters for the RMN's Eastern Fleet.

The vessel will then join first-of-class KD Keris (111), which was commissioned in January 2020, and second-of-class KD Sundang (112), which entered service on 5 March of this year.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DroneShield takes aim at emerging C-UUV and diver detection requirements with SonarOne

by Gerrard Cowan

DroneShield has expanded its range of C-UAS products with the SonarOne system, its first underwater detection device. (DroneShield)

DroneShield's new SonarOne underwater threat detection system is designed to provide an easily operated sonar product that can detect multiple targets simultaneously, with the developer responding to growing naval demands for counter-unmanned underwater vehicle (C-UUV) and diver detection technology, the company told Janes.

SonarOne was announced in early September and is part of the company's DroneSentry autonomous fixed suite of sensors and countermeasures, which also incorporates radar and company technology like DroneOpt cameras and RfOne RF detectors. The sonar and other DroneSentry sensors can also be used with the company's DroneOptIde AI-driven computer vision technology.

SonarOne can be deployed underwater as part of a DroneSentry suite at a port or a harbour as a node within a multisensory suite. It can also be used as a standalone system and can be deployed from ships as well as fixed sites.

The new product is the first sonar device developed by DroneShield, which has until now largely focused on threats like unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and electronic warfare (EW).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-conducts-first-slbm-test-launch-from-in-service-submarine/

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from a...

South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Royal Malaysian Navy receives third Keris-class Littoral Mission Ship

by Gabriel Dominguez

The Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) has received the third of four Keris-class Littoral Mission Ships (LMSs) ordered from China as part of a contract awarded in 2017 and renegotiated in 2019.

The 68.8 m-long vessel (pennant number 113), construction of which began in September 2019, was launched by China's Wuchang Shipbuilding Industry Group in Wuhan on 28 October 2020 and is expected to be inducted into the RMN in the coming weeks.

Before the handover, the ship, which apparently has yet to be named, underwent a series of port acceptance tests and sea trials. Once inducted into service the vessel will be part of the 11th LMS Squadron, which will be home-ported at Sepanggar naval base at Kota Kinabalu in the state of Sabah in the Malaysian part of the island of Borneo. Sepanggar also serves as the headquarters for the RMN's Eastern Fleet.

The vessel will then join first-of-class KD Keris (111), which was commissioned in January 2020, and second-of-class KD Sundang (112), which entered service on 5 March of this year.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DroneShield takes aim at emerging C-UUV and diver detection requirements with SonarOne

by Gerrard Cowan

DroneShield has expanded its range of C-UAS products with the SonarOne system, its first underwater detection device. (DroneShield)

DroneShield's new SonarOne underwater threat detection system is designed to provide an easily operated sonar product that can detect multiple targets simultaneously, with the developer responding to growing naval demands for counter-unmanned underwater vehicle (C-UUV) and diver detection technology, the company told Janes.

SonarOne was announced in early September and is part of the company's DroneSentry autonomous fixed suite of sensors and countermeasures, which also incorporates radar and company technology like DroneOpt cameras and RfOne RF detectors. The sonar and other DroneSentry sensors can also be used with the company's DroneOptIde AI-driven computer vision technology.

SonarOne can be deployed underwater as part of a DroneSentry suite at a port or a harbour as a node within a multisensory suite. It can also be used as a standalone system and can be deployed from ships as well as fixed sites.

The new product is the first sonar device developed by DroneShield, which has until now largely focused on threats like unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and electronic warfare (EW).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-conducts-first-slbm-test-launch-from-in-service-submarine/

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from a...

South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Royal Malaysian Navy receives third Keris-class Littoral Mission Ship

by Gabriel Dominguez

The Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) has received the third of four Keris-class Littoral Mission Ships (LMSs) ordered from China as part of a contract awarded in 2017 and renegotiated in 2019.

The 68.8 m-long vessel (pennant number 113), construction of which began in September 2019, was launched by China's Wuchang Shipbuilding Industry Group in Wuhan on 28 October 2020 and is expected to be inducted into the RMN in the coming weeks.

Before the handover, the ship, which apparently has yet to be named, underwent a series of port acceptance tests and sea trials. Once inducted into service the vessel will be part of the 11th LMS Squadron, which will be home-ported at Sepanggar naval base at Kota Kinabalu in the state of Sabah in the Malaysian part of the island of Borneo. Sepanggar also serves as the headquarters for the RMN's Eastern Fleet.

The vessel will then join first-of-class KD Keris (111), which was commissioned in January 2020, and second-of-class KD Sundang (112), which entered service on 5 March of this year.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DroneShield takes aim at emerging C-UUV and diver detection requirements with SonarOne

by Gerrard Cowan

DroneShield has expanded its range of C-UAS products with the SonarOne system, its first underwater detection device. (DroneShield)

DroneShield's new SonarOne underwater threat detection system is designed to provide an easily operated sonar product that can detect multiple targets simultaneously, with the developer responding to growing naval demands for counter-unmanned underwater vehicle (C-UUV) and diver detection technology, the company told Janes.

SonarOne was announced in early September and is part of the company's DroneSentry autonomous fixed suite of sensors and countermeasures, which also incorporates radar and company technology like DroneOpt cameras and RfOne RF detectors. The sonar and other DroneSentry sensors can also be used with the company's DroneOptIde AI-driven computer vision technology.

SonarOne can be deployed underwater as part of a DroneSentry suite at a port or a harbour as a node within a multisensory suite. It can also be used as a standalone system and can be deployed from ships as well as fixed sites.

The new product is the first sonar device developed by DroneShield, which has until now largely focused on threats like unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and electronic warfare (EW).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-conducts-first-slbm-test-launch-from-in-service-submarine/

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from a...

South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Royal Malaysian Navy receives third Keris-class Littoral Mission Ship

by Gabriel Dominguez

The Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) has received the third of four Keris-class Littoral Mission Ships (LMSs) ordered from China as part of a contract awarded in 2017 and renegotiated in 2019.

The 68.8 m-long vessel (pennant number 113), construction of which began in September 2019, was launched by China's Wuchang Shipbuilding Industry Group in Wuhan on 28 October 2020 and is expected to be inducted into the RMN in the coming weeks.

Before the handover, the ship, which apparently has yet to be named, underwent a series of port acceptance tests and sea trials. Once inducted into service the vessel will be part of the 11th LMS Squadron, which will be home-ported at Sepanggar naval base at Kota Kinabalu in the state of Sabah in the Malaysian part of the island of Borneo. Sepanggar also serves as the headquarters for the RMN's Eastern Fleet.

The vessel will then join first-of-class KD Keris (111), which was commissioned in January 2020, and second-of-class KD Sundang (112), which entered service on 5 March of this year.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DroneShield takes aim at emerging C-UUV and diver detection requirements with SonarOne

by Gerrard Cowan

DroneShield has expanded its range of C-UAS products with the SonarOne system, its first underwater detection device. (DroneShield)

DroneShield's new SonarOne underwater threat detection system is designed to provide an easily operated sonar product that can detect multiple targets simultaneously, with the developer responding to growing naval demands for counter-unmanned underwater vehicle (C-UUV) and diver detection technology, the company told Janes.

SonarOne was announced in early September and is part of the company's DroneSentry autonomous fixed suite of sensors and countermeasures, which also incorporates radar and company technology like DroneOpt cameras and RfOne RF detectors. The sonar and other DroneSentry sensors can also be used with the company's DroneOptIde AI-driven computer vision technology.

SonarOne can be deployed underwater as part of a DroneSentry suite at a port or a harbour as a node within a multisensory suite. It can also be used as a standalone system and can be deployed from ships as well as fixed sites.

The new product is the first sonar device developed by DroneShield, which has until now largely focused on threats like unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and electronic warfare (EW).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-conducts-first-slbm-test-launch-from-in-service-submarine/

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from a...

South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Royal Malaysian Navy receives third Keris-class Littoral Mission Ship

by Gabriel Dominguez

The Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) has received the third of four Keris-class Littoral Mission Ships (LMSs) ordered from China as part of a contract awarded in 2017 and renegotiated in 2019.

The 68.8 m-long vessel (pennant number 113), construction of which began in September 2019, was launched by China's Wuchang Shipbuilding Industry Group in Wuhan on 28 October 2020 and is expected to be inducted into the RMN in the coming weeks.

Before the handover, the ship, which apparently has yet to be named, underwent a series of port acceptance tests and sea trials. Once inducted into service the vessel will be part of the 11th LMS Squadron, which will be home-ported at Sepanggar naval base at Kota Kinabalu in the state of Sabah in the Malaysian part of the island of Borneo. Sepanggar also serves as the headquarters for the RMN's Eastern Fleet.

The vessel will then join first-of-class KD Keris (111), which was commissioned in January 2020, and second-of-class KD Sundang (112), which entered service on 5 March of this year.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DroneShield takes aim at emerging C-UUV and diver detection requirements with SonarOne

by Gerrard Cowan

DroneShield has expanded its range of C-UAS products with the SonarOne system, its first underwater detection device. (DroneShield)

DroneShield's new SonarOne underwater threat detection system is designed to provide an easily operated sonar product that can detect multiple targets simultaneously, with the developer responding to growing naval demands for counter-unmanned underwater vehicle (C-UUV) and diver detection technology, the company told Janes.

SonarOne was announced in early September and is part of the company's DroneSentry autonomous fixed suite of sensors and countermeasures, which also incorporates radar and company technology like DroneOpt cameras and RfOne RF detectors. The sonar and other DroneSentry sensors can also be used with the company's DroneOptIde AI-driven computer vision technology.

SonarOne can be deployed underwater as part of a DroneSentry suite at a port or a harbour as a node within a multisensory suite. It can also be used as a standalone system and can be deployed from ships as well as fixed sites.

The new product is the first sonar device developed by DroneShield, which has until now largely focused on threats like unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and electronic warfare (EW).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-conducts-first-slbm-test-launch-from-in-service-submarine/

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from a...

South Korea conducts first SLBM test launch from in-service submarine

by Gabriel Dominguez & Matteo Scarano

South Korea test-launched a locally developed SLBM from an in-service submarine for the first time on 15 September. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from an in-service submarine for the first time, according to a 15 September statement by the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul.

The MND said that the weapon, which was launched from the recently commissioned KSS-III (also spelled KSS-3)-class submarine Dosan An Chang-ho while submerged, “accurately hit” its intended simulated target, addiing that this makes South Korea one of the few countries in the world to have SLBMs.

The launch, which follows underwater ejection tests from the same boat, as well as trials using an underwater barrage, was conducted by the country's Agency for Defence Development (ADD) at its Anheung test site in South Chungcheong Province and overseen by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Defence Minister Suh Wook.

In a separate statement Moon said that South Korea's continuous improvement of its locally developed missiles will serve as a deterrent against future provocations from North Korea and help overcome asymmetric threats.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Wellington to ban entry of Australia's future submarines into New Zealand waters

by Ridzwan Rahmat

Royal Australian Navy Collins-class submarines HMAS Waller and HMAS Dechaineux . Australia has announced a plan to eventually replace these boats with nuclear-powered submarines under the trilateral AUKUS partnership with the US and the UK. (Royal Australian Navy)

Australia's future nuclear-powered submarines will not be allowed to enter New Zealand waters.

In a statement forwarded to Janes by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's office, the premier confirmed that Wellington's long-standing ban on nuclear-powered vessels remains despite news that Australia is procuring submarines with the propulsion type.

New Zealand prohibits nuclear-powered or nuclear-armed ships from using the country's ports or territorial waters, including vessels of its security partners like the US Navy (USN).

Leaders of the US, Australia, and the UK jointly announced the creation of an “enhanced trilateral security partnership” known as AUKUS on 15 September.

“As the first initiative under AUKUS, recognising our common tradition as maritime democracies, we commit to a shared ambition to support Australia in acquiring nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy,” reads a joint leaders' statement published by the White House on the same day.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Royal Malaysian Navy receives third Keris-class Littoral Mission Ship

by Gabriel Dominguez

The Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) has received the third of four Keris-class Littoral Mission Ships (LMSs) ordered from China as part of a contract awarded in 2017 and renegotiated in 2019.

The 68.8 m-long vessel (pennant number 113), construction of which began in September 2019, was launched by China's Wuchang Shipbuilding Industry Group in Wuhan on 28 October 2020 and is expected to be inducted into the RMN in the coming weeks.

Before the handover, the ship, which apparently has yet to be named, underwent a series of port acceptance tests and sea trials. Once inducted into service the vessel will be part of the 11th LMS Squadron, which will be home-ported at Sepanggar naval base at Kota Kinabalu in the state of Sabah in the Malaysian part of the island of Borneo. Sepanggar also serves as the headquarters for the RMN's Eastern Fleet.

The vessel will then join first-of-class KD Keris (111), which was commissioned in January 2020, and second-of-class KD Sundang (112), which entered service on 5 March of this year.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DroneShield takes aim at emerging C-UUV and diver detection requirements with SonarOne

by Gerrard Cowan

DroneShield has expanded its range of C-UAS products with the SonarOne system, its first underwater detection device. (DroneShield)

DroneShield's new SonarOne underwater threat detection system is designed to provide an easily operated sonar product that can detect multiple targets simultaneously, with the developer responding to growing naval demands for counter-unmanned underwater vehicle (C-UUV) and diver detection technology, the company told Janes.

SonarOne was announced in early September and is part of the company's DroneSentry autonomous fixed suite of sensors and countermeasures, which also incorporates radar and company technology like DroneOpt cameras and RfOne RF detectors. The sonar and other DroneSentry sensors can also be used with the company's DroneOptIde AI-driven computer vision technology.

SonarOne can be deployed underwater as part of a DroneSentry suite at a port or a harbour as a node within a multisensory suite. It can also be used as a standalone system and can be deployed from ships as well as fixed sites.

The new product is the first sonar device developed by DroneShield, which has until now largely focused on threats like unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and electronic warfare (EW).


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/south-korea-conducts-first-slbm-test-launch-from-in-service-submarine/

South Korea has test-launched a locally developed submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) from a...

Request Consultation

Request a free consultation to discover how Janes can provide you with assured, interconnected open-source intelligence.

News Janes | The latest defence and security news from Janes - the trusted source for defence intelligence