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Portuguese Army seeks to modernise ground-based air defences

by Victor Barreira

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems between 2024 and 2025, Major Ricardo Jorge Parcelas Araújo e Silva, area co-ordinator at the army's Forces Planning Division, told Janes .

A second platoon of four VSHORAD systems is scheduled to be received after 2026.

A request for proposal (RFP) is scheduled to be issued by the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) by September, another army source told Janes . Interested competitors will have three months to deliver bids.

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

A sales agreement between the Portuguese Army and the NSPA in 2017 sought to buy, for EUR32 million (plus EUR9 million added in November 2020), a total of eight systems consisting of eight missile launchers, ammunition, eight 4×4 armoured tactical vehicles or eight 6×6 high-mobility trucks with armoured cabin, and two vehicle-mounted or trailer-mounted short-range 3D local warning radars. Either vehicle type would have mounts for a 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm machine gun, or 40 mm automatic grenade launcher.

The VSHORAD systems are to arm the Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battery of the Mechanized Brigade and the Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion of the Intervention Brigade, and will be integrated with the SICCA3 anti-aircraft artillery command-and-control system. Both were equipped with the legacy M48A2E1/A3 Chaparral.

The RFP also includes eight weapon terminals to integrate legacy Stinger manportable air defense systems (MANPADS) with the SICCA3 system.

The SICCA3 received by the Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion in September 2016 consists of a sheltered Teknel Fire Detection Center (FDC) and Tactical Operations Center (TOC) and Arquus Kerax 4x4 trucks.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/portuguese-army-seeks-to-modernise-ground-based-air-defences/

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Ai...

Portuguese Army seeks to modernise ground-based air defences

by Victor Barreira

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems between 2024 and 2025, Major Ricardo Jorge Parcelas Araújo e Silva, area co-ordinator at the army's Forces Planning Division, told Janes .

A second platoon of four VSHORAD systems is scheduled to be received after 2026.

A request for proposal (RFP) is scheduled to be issued by the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) by September, another army source told Janes . Interested competitors will have three months to deliver bids.

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

A sales agreement between the Portuguese Army and the NSPA in 2017 sought to buy, for EUR32 million (plus EUR9 million added in November 2020), a total of eight systems consisting of eight missile launchers, ammunition, eight 4×4 armoured tactical vehicles or eight 6×6 high-mobility trucks with armoured cabin, and two vehicle-mounted or trailer-mounted short-range 3D local warning radars. Either vehicle type would have mounts for a 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm machine gun, or 40 mm automatic grenade launcher.


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DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


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Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/portuguese-army-seeks-to-modernise-ground-based-air-defences/

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Ai...

Portuguese Army seeks to modernise ground-based air defences

by Victor Barreira

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems between 2024 and 2025, Major Ricardo Jorge Parcelas Araújo e Silva, area co-ordinator at the army's Forces Planning Division, told Janes .

A second platoon of four VSHORAD systems is scheduled to be received after 2026.

A request for proposal (RFP) is scheduled to be issued by the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) by September, another army source told Janes . Interested competitors will have three months to deliver bids.

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

A sales agreement between the Portuguese Army and the NSPA in 2017 sought to buy, for EUR32 million (plus EUR9 million added in November 2020), a total of eight systems consisting of eight missile launchers, ammunition, eight 4×4 armoured tactical vehicles or eight 6×6 high-mobility trucks with armoured cabin, and two vehicle-mounted or trailer-mounted short-range 3D local warning radars. Either vehicle type would have mounts for a 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm machine gun, or 40 mm automatic grenade launcher.


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DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


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Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/portuguese-army-seeks-to-modernise-ground-based-air-defences/

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Ai...

Portuguese Army seeks to modernise ground-based air defences

by Victor Barreira

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems between 2024 and 2025, Major Ricardo Jorge Parcelas Araújo e Silva, area co-ordinator at the army's Forces Planning Division, told Janes .

A second platoon of four VSHORAD systems is scheduled to be received after 2026.

A request for proposal (RFP) is scheduled to be issued by the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) by September, another army source told Janes . Interested competitors will have three months to deliver bids.

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

A sales agreement between the Portuguese Army and the NSPA in 2017 sought to buy, for EUR32 million (plus EUR9 million added in November 2020), a total of eight systems consisting of eight missile launchers, ammunition, eight 4×4 armoured tactical vehicles or eight 6×6 high-mobility trucks with armoured cabin, and two vehicle-mounted or trailer-mounted short-range 3D local warning radars. Either vehicle type would have mounts for a 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm machine gun, or 40 mm automatic grenade launcher.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/portuguese-army-seeks-to-modernise-ground-based-air-defences/

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Ai...

Portuguese Army seeks to modernise ground-based air defences

by Victor Barreira

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems between 2024 and 2025, Major Ricardo Jorge Parcelas Araújo e Silva, area co-ordinator at the army's Forces Planning Division, told Janes .

A second platoon of four VSHORAD systems is scheduled to be received after 2026.

A request for proposal (RFP) is scheduled to be issued by the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) by September, another army source told Janes . Interested competitors will have three months to deliver bids.

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

A sales agreement between the Portuguese Army and the NSPA in 2017 sought to buy, for EUR32 million (plus EUR9 million added in November 2020), a total of eight systems consisting of eight missile launchers, ammunition, eight 4×4 armoured tactical vehicles or eight 6×6 high-mobility trucks with armoured cabin, and two vehicle-mounted or trailer-mounted short-range 3D local warning radars. Either vehicle type would have mounts for a 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm machine gun, or 40 mm automatic grenade launcher.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/portuguese-army-seeks-to-modernise-ground-based-air-defences/

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Ai...

Portuguese Army seeks to modernise ground-based air defences

by Victor Barreira

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems between 2024 and 2025, Major Ricardo Jorge Parcelas Araújo e Silva, area co-ordinator at the army's Forces Planning Division, told Janes .

A second platoon of four VSHORAD systems is scheduled to be received after 2026.

A request for proposal (RFP) is scheduled to be issued by the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) by September, another army source told Janes . Interested competitors will have three months to deliver bids.

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

A sales agreement between the Portuguese Army and the NSPA in 2017 sought to buy, for EUR32 million (plus EUR9 million added in November 2020), a total of eight systems consisting of eight missile launchers, ammunition, eight 4×4 armoured tactical vehicles or eight 6×6 high-mobility trucks with armoured cabin, and two vehicle-mounted or trailer-mounted short-range 3D local warning radars. Either vehicle type would have mounts for a 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm machine gun, or 40 mm automatic grenade launcher.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/portuguese-army-seeks-to-modernise-ground-based-air-defences/

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Ai...

Portuguese Army seeks to modernise ground-based air defences

by Victor Barreira

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems between 2024 and 2025, Major Ricardo Jorge Parcelas Araújo e Silva, area co-ordinator at the army's Forces Planning Division, told Janes .

A second platoon of four VSHORAD systems is scheduled to be received after 2026.

A request for proposal (RFP) is scheduled to be issued by the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) by September, another army source told Janes . Interested competitors will have three months to deliver bids.

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

A sales agreement between the Portuguese Army and the NSPA in 2017 sought to buy, for EUR32 million (plus EUR9 million added in November 2020), a total of eight systems consisting of eight missile launchers, ammunition, eight 4×4 armoured tactical vehicles or eight 6×6 high-mobility trucks with armoured cabin, and two vehicle-mounted or trailer-mounted short-range 3D local warning radars. Either vehicle type would have mounts for a 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm machine gun, or 40 mm automatic grenade launcher.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Ai...

Portuguese Army seeks to modernise ground-based air defences

by Victor Barreira

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems between 2024 and 2025, Major Ricardo Jorge Parcelas Araújo e Silva, area co-ordinator at the army's Forces Planning Division, told Janes .

A second platoon of four VSHORAD systems is scheduled to be received after 2026.

A request for proposal (RFP) is scheduled to be issued by the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) by September, another army source told Janes . Interested competitors will have three months to deliver bids.

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

The Portuguese Army's ground-based air defence capability is based on the Stinger MANPADS. (Victor Barreira)

A sales agreement between the Portuguese Army and the NSPA in 2017 sought to buy, for EUR32 million (plus EUR9 million added in November 2020), a total of eight systems consisting of eight missile launchers, ammunition, eight 4×4 armoured tactical vehicles or eight 6×6 high-mobility trucks with armoured cabin, and two vehicle-mounted or trailer-mounted short-range 3D local warning radars. Either vehicle type would have mounts for a 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm machine gun, or 40 mm automatic grenade launcher.


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DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


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Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/portuguese-army-seeks-to-modernise-ground-based-air-defences/

The Portuguese Army expects to receive its first platoon of four vehicle-mounted Very Short Range Ai...

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