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Kuwait receives first M1A2K tank

by Samuel Cranny-Evans

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ceremony in the United States, the Kuwait Army General Staff Headquarters announced on 29 July.

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

“The entry of the new tank into operational service soon will represent an enhancement of capabilities and an addition to the combat efficiency of the Kuwaiti Land Force,” it said in a tweet.

It released photographs and a video of the tanks to show that it has been fitted with an M153 Protector remote weapon station and the Counter Sniper Anti-Materiel Mount (CSAMM), which enables a .50 cal machine gun to be carried to the front right of the main gun.

Both these improvements were noted when the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced that Kuwait had requested upgrades for its 218 M1A2 tanks in December 2016. Kuwait subsequently decided to buy additional tank hulls rather than upgrade its existing ones.

Other upgrades noted in the original DSCA notification included ‘special armour', an M1A2 Thermal Imaging System, an AN/PSN-13 GPS receiver, an AN/VAS-5 Driver's Vision Enhancer, a Rear-View Sensor System, and SINCGARS radios.

The first contract for the new Kuwaiti tanks was announced by the US Department of Defense in December 2017. Awarded to General Dynamics Land Systems, it covered the design, development, and production of a “unique” Abrams variant for Kuwait.

A contract modification in August 2020 indicated that the delivery schedule had slipped as it gave the new estimated completion date as 30 June 2022.

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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/kuwait-receives-first-m1a2k-tank/?fbclid=IwAR1Cmn-9ADAkhFZVfKefje7jZ4KJw8yN8LWbfAW5SPWMbAKpX2zLvZliHSE

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ...

Kuwait receives first M1A2K tank

by Samuel Cranny-Evans

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ceremony in the United States, the Kuwait Army General Staff Headquarters announced on 29 July.

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

“The entry of the new tank into operational service soon will represent an enhancement of capabilities and an addition to the combat efficiency of the Kuwaiti Land Force,” it said in a tweet.

It released photographs and a video of the tanks to show that it has been fitted with an M153 Protector remote weapon station and the Counter Sniper Anti-Materiel Mount (CSAMM), which enables a .50 cal machine gun to be carried to the front right of the main gun.

Both these improvements were noted when the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced that Kuwait had requested upgrades for its 218 M1A2 tanks in December 2016. Kuwait subsequently decided to buy additional tank hulls rather than upgrade its existing ones.


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Boeing selects Australian production site for ATS loyal wingman

by Gareth Jennings

The Boeing ATS is to be built at Toowommba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, the manufacturer announced on 22 September. (Boeing)

Boeing has selected the site in Australia where it is to build the Airpower Teaming System (ATS) ‘loyal wingman' unmanned aerial vehicle, establishing the company's first final assembly line outside of North America.

The manufacturer said on 22 September that Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, had been chosen as the preferred site to build the first military combat aircraft designed, developed, and manufactured in Australia in half a century.

News of the proposed siting of the production facility came eight months after the first ATS that Boeing Australia is developing in partnership with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) made its maiden flight in February.

When it was unveiled at the Avalon Air Show in 2019, the ATS concept was named Boeing ATS (BATS). The system is not remotely piloted, however, it will be semi-autonomous and controlled from both the ground and the air.


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Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


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AFA 2021: Kendall supports continuing advanced engine development despite proposed budget cuts

by Pat Host

The US Air Force's (USAF's) new Secretary Frank Kendall endorses continuing the service's Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP) despite the USAF's fiscal year (FY) 2022 budget request calling for drastic cuts to the effort.

Kendall, who took on the role in July, told reporters on 20 September at the Air Force Association's (AFA's) annual conference that the programme has been successful as the fuel savings and the thrust increase potentially have a lot of value. He has had discussions with Carlos Del Toro, the US Navy (USN) secretary, about the sea service being part of the programme moving forward. The engines being developed for the AETP are envisioned for the USAF's next-generation combat aircraft and the USN's F/A-XX programme.

The USAF could request funding contributions from the USN to keep the AETP moving forward. A former Pentagon Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter programme official told Janes on 8 September that the AETP is solely funded by the USAF and that the US military services are not out to “give anyone a free lunch”.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/kuwait-receives-first-m1a2k-tank/?fbclid=IwAR1Cmn-9ADAkhFZVfKefje7jZ4KJw8yN8LWbfAW5SPWMbAKpX2zLvZliHSE

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ...

Kuwait receives first M1A2K tank

by Samuel Cranny-Evans

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ceremony in the United States, the Kuwait Army General Staff Headquarters announced on 29 July.

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

“The entry of the new tank into operational service soon will represent an enhancement of capabilities and an addition to the combat efficiency of the Kuwaiti Land Force,” it said in a tweet.

It released photographs and a video of the tanks to show that it has been fitted with an M153 Protector remote weapon station and the Counter Sniper Anti-Materiel Mount (CSAMM), which enables a .50 cal machine gun to be carried to the front right of the main gun.

Both these improvements were noted when the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced that Kuwait had requested upgrades for its 218 M1A2 tanks in December 2016. Kuwait subsequently decided to buy additional tank hulls rather than upgrade its existing ones.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Boeing selects Australian production site for ATS loyal wingman

by Gareth Jennings

The Boeing ATS is to be built at Toowommba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, the manufacturer announced on 22 September. (Boeing)

Boeing has selected the site in Australia where it is to build the Airpower Teaming System (ATS) ‘loyal wingman' unmanned aerial vehicle, establishing the company's first final assembly line outside of North America.

The manufacturer said on 22 September that Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, had been chosen as the preferred site to build the first military combat aircraft designed, developed, and manufactured in Australia in half a century.

News of the proposed siting of the production facility came eight months after the first ATS that Boeing Australia is developing in partnership with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) made its maiden flight in February.

When it was unveiled at the Avalon Air Show in 2019, the ATS concept was named Boeing ATS (BATS). The system is not remotely piloted, however, it will be semi-autonomous and controlled from both the ground and the air.


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Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


AFA 2021: Kendall supports continuing advanced engine development despite proposed budget cuts

by Pat Host

The US Air Force's (USAF's) new Secretary Frank Kendall endorses continuing the service's Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP) despite the USAF's fiscal year (FY) 2022 budget request calling for drastic cuts to the effort.

Kendall, who took on the role in July, told reporters on 20 September at the Air Force Association's (AFA's) annual conference that the programme has been successful as the fuel savings and the thrust increase potentially have a lot of value. He has had discussions with Carlos Del Toro, the US Navy (USN) secretary, about the sea service being part of the programme moving forward. The engines being developed for the AETP are envisioned for the USAF's next-generation combat aircraft and the USN's F/A-XX programme.

The USAF could request funding contributions from the USN to keep the AETP moving forward. A former Pentagon Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter programme official told Janes on 8 September that the AETP is solely funded by the USAF and that the US military services are not out to “give anyone a free lunch”.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/kuwait-receives-first-m1a2k-tank/?fbclid=IwAR1Cmn-9ADAkhFZVfKefje7jZ4KJw8yN8LWbfAW5SPWMbAKpX2zLvZliHSE

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ...

Kuwait receives first M1A2K tank

by Samuel Cranny-Evans

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ceremony in the United States, the Kuwait Army General Staff Headquarters announced on 29 July.

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

“The entry of the new tank into operational service soon will represent an enhancement of capabilities and an addition to the combat efficiency of the Kuwaiti Land Force,” it said in a tweet.

It released photographs and a video of the tanks to show that it has been fitted with an M153 Protector remote weapon station and the Counter Sniper Anti-Materiel Mount (CSAMM), which enables a .50 cal machine gun to be carried to the front right of the main gun.

Both these improvements were noted when the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced that Kuwait had requested upgrades for its 218 M1A2 tanks in December 2016. Kuwait subsequently decided to buy additional tank hulls rather than upgrade its existing ones.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Boeing selects Australian production site for ATS loyal wingman

by Gareth Jennings

The Boeing ATS is to be built at Toowommba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, the manufacturer announced on 22 September. (Boeing)

Boeing has selected the site in Australia where it is to build the Airpower Teaming System (ATS) ‘loyal wingman' unmanned aerial vehicle, establishing the company's first final assembly line outside of North America.

The manufacturer said on 22 September that Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, had been chosen as the preferred site to build the first military combat aircraft designed, developed, and manufactured in Australia in half a century.

News of the proposed siting of the production facility came eight months after the first ATS that Boeing Australia is developing in partnership with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) made its maiden flight in February.

When it was unveiled at the Avalon Air Show in 2019, the ATS concept was named Boeing ATS (BATS). The system is not remotely piloted, however, it will be semi-autonomous and controlled from both the ground and the air.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


AFA 2021: Kendall supports continuing advanced engine development despite proposed budget cuts

by Pat Host

The US Air Force's (USAF's) new Secretary Frank Kendall endorses continuing the service's Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP) despite the USAF's fiscal year (FY) 2022 budget request calling for drastic cuts to the effort.

Kendall, who took on the role in July, told reporters on 20 September at the Air Force Association's (AFA's) annual conference that the programme has been successful as the fuel savings and the thrust increase potentially have a lot of value. He has had discussions with Carlos Del Toro, the US Navy (USN) secretary, about the sea service being part of the programme moving forward. The engines being developed for the AETP are envisioned for the USAF's next-generation combat aircraft and the USN's F/A-XX programme.

The USAF could request funding contributions from the USN to keep the AETP moving forward. A former Pentagon Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter programme official told Janes on 8 September that the AETP is solely funded by the USAF and that the US military services are not out to “give anyone a free lunch”.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/kuwait-receives-first-m1a2k-tank/?fbclid=IwAR1Cmn-9ADAkhFZVfKefje7jZ4KJw8yN8LWbfAW5SPWMbAKpX2zLvZliHSE

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ...

Kuwait receives first M1A2K tank

by Samuel Cranny-Evans

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ceremony in the United States, the Kuwait Army General Staff Headquarters announced on 29 July.

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

“The entry of the new tank into operational service soon will represent an enhancement of capabilities and an addition to the combat efficiency of the Kuwaiti Land Force,” it said in a tweet.

It released photographs and a video of the tanks to show that it has been fitted with an M153 Protector remote weapon station and the Counter Sniper Anti-Materiel Mount (CSAMM), which enables a .50 cal machine gun to be carried to the front right of the main gun.

Both these improvements were noted when the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced that Kuwait had requested upgrades for its 218 M1A2 tanks in December 2016. Kuwait subsequently decided to buy additional tank hulls rather than upgrade its existing ones.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Boeing selects Australian production site for ATS loyal wingman

by Gareth Jennings

The Boeing ATS is to be built at Toowommba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, the manufacturer announced on 22 September. (Boeing)

Boeing has selected the site in Australia where it is to build the Airpower Teaming System (ATS) ‘loyal wingman' unmanned aerial vehicle, establishing the company's first final assembly line outside of North America.

The manufacturer said on 22 September that Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, had been chosen as the preferred site to build the first military combat aircraft designed, developed, and manufactured in Australia in half a century.

News of the proposed siting of the production facility came eight months after the first ATS that Boeing Australia is developing in partnership with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) made its maiden flight in February.

When it was unveiled at the Avalon Air Show in 2019, the ATS concept was named Boeing ATS (BATS). The system is not remotely piloted, however, it will be semi-autonomous and controlled from both the ground and the air.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


AFA 2021: Kendall supports continuing advanced engine development despite proposed budget cuts

by Pat Host

The US Air Force's (USAF's) new Secretary Frank Kendall endorses continuing the service's Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP) despite the USAF's fiscal year (FY) 2022 budget request calling for drastic cuts to the effort.

Kendall, who took on the role in July, told reporters on 20 September at the Air Force Association's (AFA's) annual conference that the programme has been successful as the fuel savings and the thrust increase potentially have a lot of value. He has had discussions with Carlos Del Toro, the US Navy (USN) secretary, about the sea service being part of the programme moving forward. The engines being developed for the AETP are envisioned for the USAF's next-generation combat aircraft and the USN's F/A-XX programme.

The USAF could request funding contributions from the USN to keep the AETP moving forward. A former Pentagon Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter programme official told Janes on 8 September that the AETP is solely funded by the USAF and that the US military services are not out to “give anyone a free lunch”.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/kuwait-receives-first-m1a2k-tank/?fbclid=IwAR1Cmn-9ADAkhFZVfKefje7jZ4KJw8yN8LWbfAW5SPWMbAKpX2zLvZliHSE

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ...

Kuwait receives first M1A2K tank

by Samuel Cranny-Evans

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ceremony in the United States, the Kuwait Army General Staff Headquarters announced on 29 July.

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

“The entry of the new tank into operational service soon will represent an enhancement of capabilities and an addition to the combat efficiency of the Kuwaiti Land Force,” it said in a tweet.

It released photographs and a video of the tanks to show that it has been fitted with an M153 Protector remote weapon station and the Counter Sniper Anti-Materiel Mount (CSAMM), which enables a .50 cal machine gun to be carried to the front right of the main gun.

Both these improvements were noted when the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced that Kuwait had requested upgrades for its 218 M1A2 tanks in December 2016. Kuwait subsequently decided to buy additional tank hulls rather than upgrade its existing ones.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Boeing selects Australian production site for ATS loyal wingman

by Gareth Jennings

The Boeing ATS is to be built at Toowommba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, the manufacturer announced on 22 September. (Boeing)

Boeing has selected the site in Australia where it is to build the Airpower Teaming System (ATS) ‘loyal wingman' unmanned aerial vehicle, establishing the company's first final assembly line outside of North America.

The manufacturer said on 22 September that Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, had been chosen as the preferred site to build the first military combat aircraft designed, developed, and manufactured in Australia in half a century.

News of the proposed siting of the production facility came eight months after the first ATS that Boeing Australia is developing in partnership with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) made its maiden flight in February.

When it was unveiled at the Avalon Air Show in 2019, the ATS concept was named Boeing ATS (BATS). The system is not remotely piloted, however, it will be semi-autonomous and controlled from both the ground and the air.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


AFA 2021: Kendall supports continuing advanced engine development despite proposed budget cuts

by Pat Host

The US Air Force's (USAF's) new Secretary Frank Kendall endorses continuing the service's Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP) despite the USAF's fiscal year (FY) 2022 budget request calling for drastic cuts to the effort.

Kendall, who took on the role in July, told reporters on 20 September at the Air Force Association's (AFA's) annual conference that the programme has been successful as the fuel savings and the thrust increase potentially have a lot of value. He has had discussions with Carlos Del Toro, the US Navy (USN) secretary, about the sea service being part of the programme moving forward. The engines being developed for the AETP are envisioned for the USAF's next-generation combat aircraft and the USN's F/A-XX programme.

The USAF could request funding contributions from the USN to keep the AETP moving forward. A former Pentagon Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter programme official told Janes on 8 September that the AETP is solely funded by the USAF and that the US military services are not out to “give anyone a free lunch”.


Get the full article by
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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/kuwait-receives-first-m1a2k-tank/?fbclid=IwAR1Cmn-9ADAkhFZVfKefje7jZ4KJw8yN8LWbfAW5SPWMbAKpX2zLvZliHSE

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ...

Kuwait receives first M1A2K tank

by Samuel Cranny-Evans

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ceremony in the United States, the Kuwait Army General Staff Headquarters announced on 29 July.

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

“The entry of the new tank into operational service soon will represent an enhancement of capabilities and an addition to the combat efficiency of the Kuwaiti Land Force,” it said in a tweet.

It released photographs and a video of the tanks to show that it has been fitted with an M153 Protector remote weapon station and the Counter Sniper Anti-Materiel Mount (CSAMM), which enables a .50 cal machine gun to be carried to the front right of the main gun.

Both these improvements were noted when the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced that Kuwait had requested upgrades for its 218 M1A2 tanks in December 2016. Kuwait subsequently decided to buy additional tank hulls rather than upgrade its existing ones.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Boeing selects Australian production site for ATS loyal wingman

by Gareth Jennings

The Boeing ATS is to be built at Toowommba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, the manufacturer announced on 22 September. (Boeing)

Boeing has selected the site in Australia where it is to build the Airpower Teaming System (ATS) ‘loyal wingman' unmanned aerial vehicle, establishing the company's first final assembly line outside of North America.

The manufacturer said on 22 September that Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, had been chosen as the preferred site to build the first military combat aircraft designed, developed, and manufactured in Australia in half a century.

News of the proposed siting of the production facility came eight months after the first ATS that Boeing Australia is developing in partnership with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) made its maiden flight in February.

When it was unveiled at the Avalon Air Show in 2019, the ATS concept was named Boeing ATS (BATS). The system is not remotely piloted, however, it will be semi-autonomous and controlled from both the ground and the air.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


AFA 2021: Kendall supports continuing advanced engine development despite proposed budget cuts

by Pat Host

The US Air Force's (USAF's) new Secretary Frank Kendall endorses continuing the service's Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP) despite the USAF's fiscal year (FY) 2022 budget request calling for drastic cuts to the effort.

Kendall, who took on the role in July, told reporters on 20 September at the Air Force Association's (AFA's) annual conference that the programme has been successful as the fuel savings and the thrust increase potentially have a lot of value. He has had discussions with Carlos Del Toro, the US Navy (USN) secretary, about the sea service being part of the programme moving forward. The engines being developed for the AETP are envisioned for the USAF's next-generation combat aircraft and the USN's F/A-XX programme.

The USAF could request funding contributions from the USN to keep the AETP moving forward. A former Pentagon Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter programme official told Janes on 8 September that the AETP is solely funded by the USAF and that the US military services are not out to “give anyone a free lunch”.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/kuwait-receives-first-m1a2k-tank/?fbclid=IwAR1Cmn-9ADAkhFZVfKefje7jZ4KJw8yN8LWbfAW5SPWMbAKpX2zLvZliHSE

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ...

Kuwait receives first M1A2K tank

by Samuel Cranny-Evans

A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ceremony in the United States, the Kuwait Army General Staff Headquarters announced on 29 July.

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

Kuwaiti officers pose with a M1A2K tank. (Kuwait Army General Staff HQ)

“The entry of the new tank into operational service soon will represent an enhancement of capabilities and an addition to the combat efficiency of the Kuwaiti Land Force,” it said in a tweet.

It released photographs and a video of the tanks to show that it has been fitted with an M153 Protector remote weapon station and the Counter Sniper Anti-Materiel Mount (CSAMM), which enables a .50 cal machine gun to be carried to the front right of the main gun.

Both these improvements were noted when the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced that Kuwait had requested upgrades for its 218 M1A2 tanks in December 2016. Kuwait subsequently decided to buy additional tank hulls rather than upgrade its existing ones.


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Boeing selects Australian production site for ATS loyal wingman

by Gareth Jennings

The Boeing ATS is to be built at Toowommba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, the manufacturer announced on 22 September. (Boeing)

Boeing has selected the site in Australia where it is to build the Airpower Teaming System (ATS) ‘loyal wingman' unmanned aerial vehicle, establishing the company's first final assembly line outside of North America.

The manufacturer said on 22 September that Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, Queensland, had been chosen as the preferred site to build the first military combat aircraft designed, developed, and manufactured in Australia in half a century.

News of the proposed siting of the production facility came eight months after the first ATS that Boeing Australia is developing in partnership with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) made its maiden flight in February.

When it was unveiled at the Avalon Air Show in 2019, the ATS concept was named Boeing ATS (BATS). The system is not remotely piloted, however, it will be semi-autonomous and controlled from both the ground and the air.


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Australian nuclear sub decision driven by technology and Chinese assertiveness

by Julian Kerr

Four of the RAN's six Collins-class submarines in close formation while transiting Cockburn Sound in Western Australia. These conventionally powered boats will now be replaced by a fleet with nuclear propulsion. (Lt C Prescott/Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia's far-reaching strategic decision to procure a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines with the assistance of the United States and United Kingdom was driven by three convergent situations, according to sources familiar with the background to the surprise 16 September announcement.

These included cost blowouts, delays, and friction in the now-cancelled AUD90 billion (USD68 billion) programme for the design and construction in Australia by French shipbuilder Naval Group of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) six Collins-class boats.

Frustration over issues with the French contract converged with concern over China's rising assertiveness in the South China Sea and a dramatic deterioration in relations between Beijing and Canberra, the sources said.

Most importantly, discreet enquiries triggered by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in 2020 had ascertained that submarine technology that was not previously available had evolved to a point where a nuclear-powered fleet did not require the support of a civil nuclear infrastructure.


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AFA 2021: Kendall supports continuing advanced engine development despite proposed budget cuts

by Pat Host

The US Air Force's (USAF's) new Secretary Frank Kendall endorses continuing the service's Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP) despite the USAF's fiscal year (FY) 2022 budget request calling for drastic cuts to the effort.

Kendall, who took on the role in July, told reporters on 20 September at the Air Force Association's (AFA's) annual conference that the programme has been successful as the fuel savings and the thrust increase potentially have a lot of value. He has had discussions with Carlos Del Toro, the US Navy (USN) secretary, about the sea service being part of the programme moving forward. The engines being developed for the AETP are envisioned for the USAF's next-generation combat aircraft and the USN's F/A-XX programme.

The USAF could request funding contributions from the USN to keep the AETP moving forward. A former Pentagon Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter programme official told Janes on 8 September that the AETP is solely funded by the USAF and that the US military services are not out to “give anyone a free lunch”.


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A delegation from Kuwait's Land Force has officially received the first M1A2K main battle tank at a ...

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