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DSEI 2021: SEA wins communications system upgrade for RNZN ANZAC frigates

by Richard Scott

HMNZS Te Kaha on post-refit trials. Te Kaha and sister ship HMNZS Te Mana are to receive a major communications upgrade. (RNZN)

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Ministry of Defence as prime integrator for the first phase of a communications upgrade on the Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) two MEKO 200ANZ ANZAC frigates.

Valued at GBP4.6 million (USD6.3 million), this initial contract increment covers the design of the communication system to be implemented on HMNZS Te Kaha and HMNZS Te Mana under the Frigate Sustainment Phase 1 (FSP1) – Communications Project. The contract represents first of the two planned project phases, which will deliver new capability from 2024.

Last month, the New Zealand government approved the NZD21.2 million external communications upgrade, which covers the introduction of a new communications control system, and modern radios for data and voice communication. The upgrade is designed to ensure the ships can handle the increasing volume of data generated by modern communications systems, and operate with other New Zealand Defence Force capabilities and coalition partners.

SEA's upgrade implementation will introduce a new open architecture external communication solution intended to reduce through life costs and associated maintenance. “The flexible, modular system will enable the navy to integrate equipment, including cryptos and radios, regardless of the manufacturer or supplier,” said the company in a statement. “The open architecture of the system will also meet interoperability requirements and allow the Royal New Zealand Navy to communicate with partner navies, which will support missions with friendly countries such as neighbouring Australia,” it added.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/dsei-2021-sea-wins-communications-system-upgrade-for-rnzn-anzac-frigates/

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Mi...

DSEI 2021: SEA wins communications system upgrade for RNZN ANZAC frigates

by Richard Scott

HMNZS Te Kaha on post-refit trials. Te Kaha and sister ship HMNZS Te Mana are to receive a major communications upgrade. (RNZN)

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Ministry of Defence as prime integrator for the first phase of a communications upgrade on the Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) two MEKO 200ANZ ANZAC frigates.

Valued at GBP4.6 million (USD6.3 million), this initial contract increment covers the design of the communication system to be implemented on HMNZS Te Kaha and HMNZS Te Mana under the Frigate Sustainment Phase 1 (FSP1) – Communications Project. The contract represents first of the two planned project phases, which will deliver new capability from 2024.

Last month, the New Zealand government approved the NZD21.2 million external communications upgrade, which covers the introduction of a new communications control system, and modern radios for data and voice communication. The upgrade is designed to ensure the ships can handle the increasing volume of data generated by modern communications systems, and operate with other New Zealand Defence Force capabilities and coalition partners.


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Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


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Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/dsei-2021-sea-wins-communications-system-upgrade-for-rnzn-anzac-frigates/

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Mi...

DSEI 2021: SEA wins communications system upgrade for RNZN ANZAC frigates

by Richard Scott

HMNZS Te Kaha on post-refit trials. Te Kaha and sister ship HMNZS Te Mana are to receive a major communications upgrade. (RNZN)

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Ministry of Defence as prime integrator for the first phase of a communications upgrade on the Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) two MEKO 200ANZ ANZAC frigates.

Valued at GBP4.6 million (USD6.3 million), this initial contract increment covers the design of the communication system to be implemented on HMNZS Te Kaha and HMNZS Te Mana under the Frigate Sustainment Phase 1 (FSP1) – Communications Project. The contract represents first of the two planned project phases, which will deliver new capability from 2024.

Last month, the New Zealand government approved the NZD21.2 million external communications upgrade, which covers the introduction of a new communications control system, and modern radios for data and voice communication. The upgrade is designed to ensure the ships can handle the increasing volume of data generated by modern communications systems, and operate with other New Zealand Defence Force capabilities and coalition partners.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/dsei-2021-sea-wins-communications-system-upgrade-for-rnzn-anzac-frigates/

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Mi...

DSEI 2021: SEA wins communications system upgrade for RNZN ANZAC frigates

by Richard Scott

HMNZS Te Kaha on post-refit trials. Te Kaha and sister ship HMNZS Te Mana are to receive a major communications upgrade. (RNZN)

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Ministry of Defence as prime integrator for the first phase of a communications upgrade on the Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) two MEKO 200ANZ ANZAC frigates.

Valued at GBP4.6 million (USD6.3 million), this initial contract increment covers the design of the communication system to be implemented on HMNZS Te Kaha and HMNZS Te Mana under the Frigate Sustainment Phase 1 (FSP1) – Communications Project. The contract represents first of the two planned project phases, which will deliver new capability from 2024.

Last month, the New Zealand government approved the NZD21.2 million external communications upgrade, which covers the introduction of a new communications control system, and modern radios for data and voice communication. The upgrade is designed to ensure the ships can handle the increasing volume of data generated by modern communications systems, and operate with other New Zealand Defence Force capabilities and coalition partners.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/dsei-2021-sea-wins-communications-system-upgrade-for-rnzn-anzac-frigates/

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Mi...

DSEI 2021: SEA wins communications system upgrade for RNZN ANZAC frigates

by Richard Scott

HMNZS Te Kaha on post-refit trials. Te Kaha and sister ship HMNZS Te Mana are to receive a major communications upgrade. (RNZN)

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Ministry of Defence as prime integrator for the first phase of a communications upgrade on the Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) two MEKO 200ANZ ANZAC frigates.

Valued at GBP4.6 million (USD6.3 million), this initial contract increment covers the design of the communication system to be implemented on HMNZS Te Kaha and HMNZS Te Mana under the Frigate Sustainment Phase 1 (FSP1) – Communications Project. The contract represents first of the two planned project phases, which will deliver new capability from 2024.

Last month, the New Zealand government approved the NZD21.2 million external communications upgrade, which covers the introduction of a new communications control system, and modern radios for data and voice communication. The upgrade is designed to ensure the ships can handle the increasing volume of data generated by modern communications systems, and operate with other New Zealand Defence Force capabilities and coalition partners.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/dsei-2021-sea-wins-communications-system-upgrade-for-rnzn-anzac-frigates/

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Mi...

DSEI 2021: SEA wins communications system upgrade for RNZN ANZAC frigates

by Richard Scott

HMNZS Te Kaha on post-refit trials. Te Kaha and sister ship HMNZS Te Mana are to receive a major communications upgrade. (RNZN)

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Ministry of Defence as prime integrator for the first phase of a communications upgrade on the Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) two MEKO 200ANZ ANZAC frigates.

Valued at GBP4.6 million (USD6.3 million), this initial contract increment covers the design of the communication system to be implemented on HMNZS Te Kaha and HMNZS Te Mana under the Frigate Sustainment Phase 1 (FSP1) – Communications Project. The contract represents first of the two planned project phases, which will deliver new capability from 2024.

Last month, the New Zealand government approved the NZD21.2 million external communications upgrade, which covers the introduction of a new communications control system, and modern radios for data and voice communication. The upgrade is designed to ensure the ships can handle the increasing volume of data generated by modern communications systems, and operate with other New Zealand Defence Force capabilities and coalition partners.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/dsei-2021-sea-wins-communications-system-upgrade-for-rnzn-anzac-frigates/

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Mi...

DSEI 2021: SEA wins communications system upgrade for RNZN ANZAC frigates

by Richard Scott

HMNZS Te Kaha on post-refit trials. Te Kaha and sister ship HMNZS Te Mana are to receive a major communications upgrade. (RNZN)

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Ministry of Defence as prime integrator for the first phase of a communications upgrade on the Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) two MEKO 200ANZ ANZAC frigates.

Valued at GBP4.6 million (USD6.3 million), this initial contract increment covers the design of the communication system to be implemented on HMNZS Te Kaha and HMNZS Te Mana under the Frigate Sustainment Phase 1 (FSP1) – Communications Project. The contract represents first of the two planned project phases, which will deliver new capability from 2024.

Last month, the New Zealand government approved the NZD21.2 million external communications upgrade, which covers the introduction of a new communications control system, and modern radios for data and voice communication. The upgrade is designed to ensure the ships can handle the increasing volume of data generated by modern communications systems, and operate with other New Zealand Defence Force capabilities and coalition partners.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/dsei-2021-sea-wins-communications-system-upgrade-for-rnzn-anzac-frigates/

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Mi...

DSEI 2021: SEA wins communications system upgrade for RNZN ANZAC frigates

by Richard Scott

HMNZS Te Kaha on post-refit trials. Te Kaha and sister ship HMNZS Te Mana are to receive a major communications upgrade. (RNZN)

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Ministry of Defence as prime integrator for the first phase of a communications upgrade on the Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) two MEKO 200ANZ ANZAC frigates.

Valued at GBP4.6 million (USD6.3 million), this initial contract increment covers the design of the communication system to be implemented on HMNZS Te Kaha and HMNZS Te Mana under the Frigate Sustainment Phase 1 (FSP1) – Communications Project. The contract represents first of the two planned project phases, which will deliver new capability from 2024.

Last month, the New Zealand government approved the NZD21.2 million external communications upgrade, which covers the introduction of a new communications control system, and modern radios for data and voice communication. The upgrade is designed to ensure the ships can handle the increasing volume of data generated by modern communications systems, and operate with other New Zealand Defence Force capabilities and coalition partners.


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Australian industry groups urge Canberra to seize submarine capability opportunity

by Jon Grevatt & Jon Grevatt

Australia's leading industrial organisations have welcomed Canberra's decision to procure nuclear-powered submarines through the country's newly announced AUKUS security partnership.

Senior representatives from the Australian Industry & Defence Network (AIDN) and the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) told Janes on 16 September that the decision represents an opportunity for local industry to develop world-leading submarine capability.

However, they also pointed out that for these benefits to be fully realised, the government needs to ensure that local industry is fully involved in the submarine development and production programme.

This is reflective of continuing concerns in Australia that local firms – particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – are not always given an opportunity to participate in major defence procurement programmes.

Brent Clark, the CEO of AIDN, told Janes, “This is a genuine once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … to enable Australian industry to work with US and UK counterparts and to facilitate the necessary upskilling and technology transfers so that Australian industry can fully support the new submarine. We cannot afford to waste this opportunity.”


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Doubts hang over NATO and EU's ability to procure quickly from small tech players

by Brooks Tigner

Both NATO and the European Union are keen to work with dual-use technology companies and start-ups for the disruptive technologies they seek. Yet each – and particularly NATO – faces formidable challenges to flexibly apply their heavy procurement rules in favour of small players, as officials from both organisations acknowledge.

“We know that SMEs [small and medium-sized enterprises] don't have the capacity to deal with the paperwork since there are certain rules we have to comply with, which limits what we can do to reduce red tape,” said François Arbault, head of defence industry policy at DG DEFIS, the European Commission's defence and space department. He and others addressed the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Europe's annual conference in Brussels on 14-15 September.

Arbault's unit oversees disbursement of the EU's new European Defence Fund (EDF), worth EUR8 billion (USD9.4 billion) for 2021-27, two-thirds of which will support defence capability development.

“However, we have to do our best to reduce it [paperwork] because if our 27 member states see in 2028 that most of the money has gone to just a few big players or countries, they'll never go for this [the EDF] again,” he said.


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Australia deals submarine blow to France but says strategic issues a priority

by Jon Grevatt

The French government and Naval Group have expressed anger and disappointment at Australia's decision to cease its procurement of Attack-class submarines in favour of a nuclear-powered platform through a new security partnership with the UK and the US.

The Australian government has not commented on the possible repercussions of the decision on its relationship with France. Instead, it has emphasised that its decision was influenced by strategic considerations.

In an emailed statement to Janes, Naval Group said, “The Commonwealth decided not to proceed with the next phase of the [Attack-class] programme. This is a major disappointment for Naval Group.”

“For five years, Naval Group teams, both in France and in Australia, as well as our partners, have given their best and Naval Group has delivered on all its commitments,” said the company, which is majority-owned by the French government. “The analysis of the consequences of this sovereign Australian decision will be conducted with the Commonwealth of Australia in the coming days.”

The French Armed Forces Ministry's statement on its website was stronger. The ministry called the submarine announcement a “regrettable decision” that is “contrary to the letter and spirit of co-operation” between France and Australia.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/dsei-2021-sea-wins-communications-system-upgrade-for-rnzn-anzac-frigates/

SEA, a subsidiary of the UK-based technology group Cohort, has been contracted by the New Zealand Mi...

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