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Army 2020: Kronshtadt unveils small air-launched munitions for UAVs

by Nikolai Novichkov

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the Army 2020 defence exhibition held in Kubinka near Moscow on 23-29 August. These weapons have been developed by a wide range of companies, including the Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV) and the Central Research and Scientific Institute of Chemical Machine-building (TsNIIKhM).

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV director general Boris Obnosov told Janes on 26 August, “The corporation is designing new missiles and bombs for UAVs and upgrading existing ones. KTRV is now developing [small] 50–100 kg weapons for the blossoming UAV market.” He said his company is working with Kronshtadt and the Sukhoi Design Bureau on weapons for their UAVs.

At Army 2020, a range of [small] 20–100 kg air-launched weapons was showcased alongside the Orion reconnaissance UAV. The first Orion unmanned aerial system (UAS) comprising three vehicles was delivered to the troops last spring for operational evaluation and is now capable of performing both reconnaissance and combat missions.

KTRV’s 50 kg Kh-50 guided missile can engage small soft skinned ground and surface targets. It is 1.8 m long and has a diameter of 180 mm. The munition has 300 mm fins and carries a 10–20 kg high explosive fragmentation (HE-FRAG) warhead.

TsNIIKhM’s KB-20 guided bomb weighs 21 kg and carries a 7 kg HE-FRAG warhead and a satellite receiver or laser guidance unit. It is 900 mm long and has a diameter of 130 mm and has 350 mm fins. The munition is designed to engage personnel and soft skinned targets.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/army-2020-kronshtadt-unveils-small-air-launched-munitions-for-uavs/

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial v...

Army 2020: Kronshtadt unveils small air-launched munitions for UAVs

by Nikolai Novichkov

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the Army 2020 defence exhibition held in Kubinka near Moscow on 23-29 August. These weapons have been developed by a wide range of companies, including the Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV) and the Central Research and Scientific Institute of Chemical Machine-building (TsNIIKhM).

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV director general Boris Obnosov told Janes on 26 August, “The corporation is designing new missiles and bombs for UAVs and upgrading existing ones. KTRV is now developing [small] 50–100 kg weapons for the blossoming UAV market.” He said his company is working with Kronshtadt and the Sukhoi Design Bureau on weapons for their UAVs.

At Army 2020, a range of [small] 20–100 kg air-launched weapons was showcased alongside the Orion reconnaissance UAV. The first Orion unmanned aerial system (UAS) comprising three vehicles was delivered to the troops last spring for operational evaluation and is now capable of performing both reconnaissance and combat missions.


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DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/army-2020-kronshtadt-unveils-small-air-launched-munitions-for-uavs/

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial v...

Army 2020: Kronshtadt unveils small air-launched munitions for UAVs

by Nikolai Novichkov

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the Army 2020 defence exhibition held in Kubinka near Moscow on 23-29 August. These weapons have been developed by a wide range of companies, including the Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV) and the Central Research and Scientific Institute of Chemical Machine-building (TsNIIKhM).

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV director general Boris Obnosov told Janes on 26 August, “The corporation is designing new missiles and bombs for UAVs and upgrading existing ones. KTRV is now developing [small] 50–100 kg weapons for the blossoming UAV market.” He said his company is working with Kronshtadt and the Sukhoi Design Bureau on weapons for their UAVs.

At Army 2020, a range of [small] 20–100 kg air-launched weapons was showcased alongside the Orion reconnaissance UAV. The first Orion unmanned aerial system (UAS) comprising three vehicles was delivered to the troops last spring for operational evaluation and is now capable of performing both reconnaissance and combat missions.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/army-2020-kronshtadt-unveils-small-air-launched-munitions-for-uavs/

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial v...

Army 2020: Kronshtadt unveils small air-launched munitions for UAVs

by Nikolai Novichkov

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the Army 2020 defence exhibition held in Kubinka near Moscow on 23-29 August. These weapons have been developed by a wide range of companies, including the Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV) and the Central Research and Scientific Institute of Chemical Machine-building (TsNIIKhM).

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV director general Boris Obnosov told Janes on 26 August, “The corporation is designing new missiles and bombs for UAVs and upgrading existing ones. KTRV is now developing [small] 50–100 kg weapons for the blossoming UAV market.” He said his company is working with Kronshtadt and the Sukhoi Design Bureau on weapons for their UAVs.

At Army 2020, a range of [small] 20–100 kg air-launched weapons was showcased alongside the Orion reconnaissance UAV. The first Orion unmanned aerial system (UAS) comprising three vehicles was delivered to the troops last spring for operational evaluation and is now capable of performing both reconnaissance and combat missions.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/army-2020-kronshtadt-unveils-small-air-launched-munitions-for-uavs/

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial v...

Army 2020: Kronshtadt unveils small air-launched munitions for UAVs

by Nikolai Novichkov

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the Army 2020 defence exhibition held in Kubinka near Moscow on 23-29 August. These weapons have been developed by a wide range of companies, including the Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV) and the Central Research and Scientific Institute of Chemical Machine-building (TsNIIKhM).

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV director general Boris Obnosov told Janes on 26 August, “The corporation is designing new missiles and bombs for UAVs and upgrading existing ones. KTRV is now developing [small] 50–100 kg weapons for the blossoming UAV market.” He said his company is working with Kronshtadt and the Sukhoi Design Bureau on weapons for their UAVs.

At Army 2020, a range of [small] 20–100 kg air-launched weapons was showcased alongside the Orion reconnaissance UAV. The first Orion unmanned aerial system (UAS) comprising three vehicles was delivered to the troops last spring for operational evaluation and is now capable of performing both reconnaissance and combat missions.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/army-2020-kronshtadt-unveils-small-air-launched-munitions-for-uavs/

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial v...

Army 2020: Kronshtadt unveils small air-launched munitions for UAVs

by Nikolai Novichkov

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the Army 2020 defence exhibition held in Kubinka near Moscow on 23-29 August. These weapons have been developed by a wide range of companies, including the Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV) and the Central Research and Scientific Institute of Chemical Machine-building (TsNIIKhM).

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV director general Boris Obnosov told Janes on 26 August, “The corporation is designing new missiles and bombs for UAVs and upgrading existing ones. KTRV is now developing [small] 50–100 kg weapons for the blossoming UAV market.” He said his company is working with Kronshtadt and the Sukhoi Design Bureau on weapons for their UAVs.

At Army 2020, a range of [small] 20–100 kg air-launched weapons was showcased alongside the Orion reconnaissance UAV. The first Orion unmanned aerial system (UAS) comprising three vehicles was delivered to the troops last spring for operational evaluation and is now capable of performing both reconnaissance and combat missions.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


https://www.janes.com/defence-news/army-2020-kronshtadt-unveils-small-air-launched-munitions-for-uavs/

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial v...

Army 2020: Kronshtadt unveils small air-launched munitions for UAVs

by Nikolai Novichkov

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the Army 2020 defence exhibition held in Kubinka near Moscow on 23-29 August. These weapons have been developed by a wide range of companies, including the Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV) and the Central Research and Scientific Institute of Chemical Machine-building (TsNIIKhM).

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV director general Boris Obnosov told Janes on 26 August, “The corporation is designing new missiles and bombs for UAVs and upgrading existing ones. KTRV is now developing [small] 50–100 kg weapons for the blossoming UAV market.” He said his company is working with Kronshtadt and the Sukhoi Design Bureau on weapons for their UAVs.

At Army 2020, a range of [small] 20–100 kg air-launched weapons was showcased alongside the Orion reconnaissance UAV. The first Orion unmanned aerial system (UAS) comprising three vehicles was delivered to the troops last spring for operational evaluation and is now capable of performing both reconnaissance and combat missions.


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


Get the full article by
Already a Janes subscriber? Keep reading


Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/army-2020-kronshtadt-unveils-small-air-launched-munitions-for-uavs/

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial v...

Army 2020: Kronshtadt unveils small air-launched munitions for UAVs

by Nikolai Novichkov

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the Army 2020 defence exhibition held in Kubinka near Moscow on 23-29 August. These weapons have been developed by a wide range of companies, including the Tactical Missiles Corporation (KTRV) and the Central Research and Scientific Institute of Chemical Machine-building (TsNIIKhM).

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV’s Kh-50 guided missile (foreground) next to three TsNIIKhM KB-20 guided bombs for the Orion UAV (background) at Army 2020. (Nikolai Novichkov)

KTRV director general Boris Obnosov told Janes on 26 August, “The corporation is designing new missiles and bombs for UAVs and upgrading existing ones. KTRV is now developing [small] 50–100 kg weapons for the blossoming UAV market.” He said his company is working with Kronshtadt and the Sukhoi Design Bureau on weapons for their UAVs.

At Army 2020, a range of [small] 20–100 kg air-launched weapons was showcased alongside the Orion reconnaissance UAV. The first Orion unmanned aerial system (UAS) comprising three vehicles was delivered to the troops last spring for operational evaluation and is now capable of performing both reconnaissance and combat missions.


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DSEI 2021: TDW's PARM 1 seeks comeback

by Riccardo Cociani

The mock-up of the PARM 1 with an IR sensor displayed at DSEI. (Janes/Riccardo Cociani)

TDW GmbH, a subsidiary of MBDA Germany, publicly displayed its Automated Anti-Tank Weapon (PARM) for the first time at the DSEI show in London on 14–17 September, marking a de facto relaunch for a system that was developed in the 1980s.

The company displayed a PARM 1 with a mock-up infrared (IR) sensor fitted to a new accessory rail to show an alternative way of triggering the off-route mine, which is normally initiated when a vehicle crushes a fibre-optic cable strung out across its path or manually using a command wire. The IR sensor would enable it to be programmed so that it allows a pre-set number to pass by before it fires.

Christoph Schwarz, TDW Business Development Marketing & Contract representative, told Janes only prototypes of the IR sensor have been developed so far. Concepts for radar, magnetic, and seismic sensors are also being worked on, he added. TDW developed similar concepts in the 1990s, such as replacing the fibre-optic cable with a combination of an acoustic and a passive/active IR sensors.

According to


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Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in place of discontinued Attack-class programme

by Julian Kerr

Australia is to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines in-country for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in the first initiative of the enhanced AUKUS trilateral security partnership jointly announced by leaders of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States on 15 September.

The announcement confirmed that Canberra is scrapping its contracts with French shipbuilder Naval Group for the design and construction of 12 conventionally powered Attack-class submarines to replace the RAN's six-strong Collins-class submarine fleet at an estimated acquisition cost of AUD90 billion (USD68 billion).

Thanking Naval Group, the government of France, and combat system integrator Lockheed Matin for their efforts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a statement that accelerating changes to regional security meant conventional submarines were unsuited to Australia's needs in the decades ahead.

Under AUKUS, the three nations would focus immediately on identifying the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia, he said.


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South Korea aims to launch indigenous solid-propellant space-launch vehicle by 2023

by Gabriel Dominguez & Dae Young Kim

After the ADD conducted combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July, South Korea's MND announced that the country aims to develop and begin operating a new solid-propellant space launch vehicle by 2024. (Agency for Defense Development)

South Korea plans to develop and start operating a new space launch vehicle by 2024 from its Naro Space Center in Goheung County, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) in Seoul disclosed on 16 September.

The announcement comes after the country's Agency of Defense Development (ADD) carried out successful combustion tests of a new solid-propellant rocket engine on 29 July.

The planned space launch vehicle will be used to place small satellites or multiple ultra-small satellites into low Earth orbit, increasing South Korea's space-based defence capabilities, noted the MND, pointing out that the indigenous development of such technologies only became possible after the lifting of restrictions under the US-South Korea missile guidelines agreement.

On 7 September South Korea's Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology announced that it intends to support know-how transfers to private local companies to promote the development of the domestic space-launch vehicle market.


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https://www.janes.com/defence-news/army-2020-kronshtadt-unveils-small-air-launched-munitions-for-uavs/

Russia’s JSC Kronshtadt unveiled its new range of small air-launched munitions for unmanned aerial v...

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