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C4iSR: Air

USMC begins the search for updated MADIS weapon systems

13 December 2018

In response to the US military's increasing concern with adversary unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), the US Marine Corps (USMC) is moving forward with its Marine Air Defense Integrated System (MADIS) initiative and soliciting industry's help to rush near-term, counter-UAS into the field. The programme includes a UAS equipped with a kinetic capability to shoot down other UAS.The USMC is seeking C-UAS weapons as well as a potential new radar for its MADIS. Pictured here are a Polaris MRZR tactical vehicle fitted with a RADA radar and EO/IR camera (right) alongside a larger M-ATV fitted with a 30 mm gun and a quad launcher for the Coyote UAS (left). (IHS Markit/Geoff Fein)The USMC is seeking C-UAS weapons as well as a potential new radar for its MADIS. Pictured here are a Polaris MRZR tactical vehicle fitted with a RADA radar and EO/IR camera (right) alongside a larger M-ATV fitted with a 30 mm gun and a quad launcher for the Coyote UAS (left). (IHS Markit/Geoff Fein)

To defend forward operating areas, manoeuvre forces, and vital areas, the USMC's Low Altitude Air Defense (LAAD) battalion employs Ground-Based Air Defense (GBAD) equipment including legacy Advanced Man Portable Air Defense System (A-MANPADS) and the Stinger missile system. The service also has a "requirement" for the GBAD Future Weapons Systems (FWS) to shoot down UAS, as well as fixed-wing (FW) and rotary-wing (RW) aircraft threats, the corps said in a 3 December solicitation.

"The defense of manoeuvre forces requires an integrated and in-depth air defense umbrella based upon the rapid kill chain sequence of 'detect', 'track', 'identify', and 'defeat'," the USMC added. "This doctrinal task sequence provides the foundation for the concept of operation enabling the MADIS to use organic and/or non-organic data to acquire, engage, and negate or destroy aerial threats in flight by kinetic and non-kinetic means."

The USMC currently has three MADIS increments planned over the next 10 years, each designed to protect the Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) against low observable/low radar cross-section threats including UAS and cruise missiles. The GBAD Future Weapon System (Increment 1) includes the counter-UAS (C-UAS) capability and will be fielded on the forthcoming Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV). The system, however, will initially be fitted onto the Mine-resistant ambush-protected All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) until the service begins receiving the JLTV. Increment 1 will include two MADIS vehicle variants operating in tandem: a Stinger variant (Mk 1) and a C-UAS variant (Mk 2).

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