CONTENT PREVIEW
C4iSR: Joint & Common Equipment

AUSA 2017: US Army to get mobile Patriot C2 system by end of 2017

15 October 2017

Raytheon will deliver the first of five mobile Patriot Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) battalion command-and-control (C2) units to the US Army by 1 December, with the remaining systems to be provided by the end of 2017.Raytheon has developed a new mobile C2 capability for its Patriot IAMD system that condenses multiple vehicle-mounted shelters and gear into seven transit cases. (IHS Markit/Geoff Fein)Raytheon has developed a new mobile C2 capability for its Patriot IAMD system that condenses multiple vehicle-mounted shelters and gear into seven transit cases. (IHS Markit/Geoff Fein)

The Dismounted Patriot C2 system is packed into seven transit cases and replaces multiple truck-mounted systems including the C2 shelter, vehicle-mounted planning shelter, and vehicle-mounted antenna. It also houses the power systems, fuel, tools, parts, and personnel to operate Patriot.

The cost of the mobile system is less than 10% of the cost of the truck-mounted version, Robert Kelley, senior manager IAMD business development told, Jane’s on 10 October at the annual Association of the US Army (AUSA) symposium in Washington.

The mobile system includes internal and external communications, planning capability, and two additional cases that would house the manned stations, screens, and keyboards. It can be plugged directly in to any stable power source.

However, the new C2 system is not being marketed as a replacement for the existing one, Kelley said.

“At a low cost, low logistics tail, and low manpower, it can increase the C2 capacity of the Patriot force at large by providing [the mobile C2 capability] to commanders in the field,” he said.

Raytheon has most recently demonstrated the capability in mid-2017 in a European exercise. During that demonstration, a prototype of the dismounted system was deployed forward with a battery to Lithuania. Kelley said the system integrated seamlessly with the full truck-mounted versions of the Patriot systems that stayed behind in the rear.

Three weeks after the Lithuanian demonstration, Sweden requested an opportunity to test the mobile unit. The same battalion deployed a Patriot battery to Sweden taking only the prototype unit, and leaving the truck-mounted capability behind.

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